Philibert-Louis Debucourt

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Promenade of the gallery of the Royal Palace, aquatint from 1798.

Philibert-Louis Debucourt, (13 February 1755 – 22 September 1832) was a French painter and engraver.

Life[edit]

Passez Payez, hand coloured aquatint after Carle Vernet, 1818, now in the collection of the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Debucourt, was born in Paris in 1755, and became a pupil of Vien. He executed a few plates in mezzotint, such as the Heureuse famille, the Benediction de la mariée, and the Cruche cassée, after his own designs. Most of his work was, however, in aquatint.[1] He became the leading maker of multi-plate colour prints, combining washes of aquatint with line-engraving.[2] He used a number of different techniques, but most involved three colour plates, and a fourth key plate, outlining the design in black.[3]

Debucourt's father-in-law was the sculptor Louis-Philippe Mouchy. In the marriage contract Mouchy generously offered to provide a three-room apartment at the Louvre, where Debucourt lived for twelve and a half years. The address of this apartment is often given on his prints.[4] Some of his work was satirical, such as La promenade publique, an aquatint of 1792 showing a crowd in the gardens the Palais-Royal.[2] As well as work from his own designs, he made aquatints after Carle Vernet, including the Horse Frightened by a Lion, the Horse Frightened by Lightning and the Strayed Huntsman.[1]

Debucourt was assisted for some years by his pupil and nephew, Jean-Pierre-Marie Jazet. He died at Belleville in 1832.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bryan 1886
  2. ^ a b "The public promenade". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 22 October 2012. 
  3. ^ Griffiths, Antony (1996). Prints and Printmaking: An Introduction to the History and Techniques. University of California Press,. p. 198. ISBN 9780520207141. 
  4. ^ Taws, Richard (2013). The Politics of the Provisional: Art and Ephemera in Revolutionary France. Penn State Press. p. 181. ISBN 0-271-06189-8. Retrieved 2014-07-01. 

Sources[edit]

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