Philip A. Traynor

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This article is about the dentist and politician from mid twentieth century Delaware. For other people, see Philip Traynor (disambiguation).
Philip A. Traynor
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Delaware's At-large district
In office
January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1947
Preceded by Earle D. Willey
Succeeded by J. Caleb Boggs
In office
January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1943
Preceded by George S. Williams
Succeeded by Earle D. Willey
Personal details
Born (1874-05-31)May 31, 1874
Wilmington, Delaware
Died December 5, 1962(1962-12-05) (aged 88)
Wilmington, Delaware
Political party Democratic
Residence Wilmington, Delaware
Alma mater University of Delaware
Profession dentist

Dr. Philip Andrew Traynor (May 31, 1874 – December 5, 1962) was an American dentist and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. He was a member of the Democratic Party and served two terms as U.S. Representative from Delaware.

Early life and family[edit]

Traynor was born in Wilmington, Delaware. He attended the public schools, Goldey Business College, in Wilmington, and the University of Delaware at Newark. He graduated in 1895 from the dental department of the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, and began the practice of dentistry in Wilmington.

Professional and political career[edit]

Traynor was a member of the Delaware board of dentistry from 1918 until 1943, serving as its chairman after 1922. He was also vice president and member of the board of trustees of Ferris Industrial School for Boys from 1938 until 1942. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1940, defeating incumbent Republican U.S. Representative George S. Williams. He lost his bid for a second term in 1942 to Republican, Earle D. Willey, but in a 1944 rematch defeated Willey, and returned to the U.S. House. Finally, he lost his bid for a third term to Republican J. Caleb Boggs, a New Castle County lawyer, and war veteran. Traynor served in the Democratic majority in the 77th and 79th Congress. He was in office from January 3, 1941 until January 3, 1943, and again from January 3, 1945 until January 3, 1947, during the administrations of U.S. Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman.

Death and legacy[edit]

Traynor died at Wilmington, and is buried in the Cathedral Cemetery there.

Almanac[edit]

Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1. U.S. Representatives take office January 3 and have a two-year term.


Public Offices
Office Type Location Began office Ended office notes
U.S. Representative Legislature Washington January 3, 1941 January 3, 1943
U.S. Representative Legislature Washington January 3, 1945 January 3, 1947


United States Congressional service
Dates Congress Chamber Majority President Committees Class/District
1941–1943 77th U.S. House Democratic Franklin D. Roosevelt at-large
1945–1947 79th U.S. House Democratic Harry S. Truman at-large
Election results
Year Office Subject Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes %
1940 U.S. Representative Philip A. Traynor Democratic 68,205 51% George S. Williams Republican 64,384 48%
1942 U.S. Representative Philip A. Traynor Democratic 38,791 46% Earle D. Willey Republican 45,376 54%
1944 U.S. Representative Philip A. Traynor Democratic 63,649 50% Earle D. Willey Republican 62,378 49%
1946 U.S. Representative Philip A. Traynor Democratic 49,105 44% J. Caleb Boggs Republican 63,516 56%

References[edit]

  • Martin, Roger A. (1995). Memoirs of the Senate. 

External links[edit]

Places with more information[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
George S. Williams
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Delaware's at-large congressional district

1941–1943
Succeeded by
Earle D. Willey
Preceded by
Earle D. Willey
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Delaware's at-large congressional district

1945–1947
Succeeded by
J. Caleb Boggs