Philip C. Wehle

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Philip Campbell Wehle
Born (1906-09-05)September 5, 1906
Westport, Connecticut
Died September 20, 1978(1978-09-20) (aged 72)
Washington, D.C.
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch United States Army seal United States Army
Years of service 1930-1965
Rank US-O8 insignia.svg Major General
Service number 0-18067
Commands held Military District of Washington
Battles/wars World War II
Cold War
Awards Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit

Philip Campbell Wehle (September 5, 1906 – September 20, 1978) was a Major General in the U.S. Army and the Commanding General of the Military District of Washington (MDW) (CG MDW) from 1962 to 1965.

Biography[edit]

Wehle was born in Westport, Connecticut and raised in Norwalk. He graduated from Norwalk High School in 1924[1] and attended West Point, graduating in June 1930.[2] During the World War II, Wehle served a tour of duty in Pacific Theater, where he served with first Joint Army-Navy Task Force.

After his return back to the United States, Wehle was transferred to Camp Hale, Colorado, where he was appointed Commanding officer of Artillery Battalion. He was subsequently assigned to the staff of XVIII Airborne Corps as Assistant Artillery Officer. He participated in the Battle of the Bulge, Rhineland Campaign and Central European Campaign. For his service in this capacity, Colonel Wehle was decorated with Legion of Merit.[3]

After the War, he served with Occupation Forces in Heidelberg, Germany and subsequently in the Plans Section until 1949. He was also appointed later the Secretary of the General Staff, Army Field Forces Headquarters at Fort Monroe. In 1950, Wehle was transferred back to the Europe, to serve as Chief of the Personnel Branch of United States Army, Europe.

In August 1963, Wehle was appointed the Commanding General of the Military District of Washington. As CG MDW, he helped plan three state funerals, all of which happened within a span of 12 months:

All three state funerals General Wehle helped plan had one thing in common: the riderless horse was Black Jack. Black Jack would be the riderless horse in one more state funeral: that of Lyndon B. Johnson in 1973.

For his service as the Commanding General of the Military District of Washington, Major General Wehle was decorated with Army Distinguished Service Medal.[4] He subsequently retired from the Army on September 19, 1965.

Following his retirement, Wehle worked on the staff of the Research and Analysis Corporation in McLean, Virginia. He later taught English language and History at the Heights School in Washington, D.C.

Major General Philip C. Wehle died on September 20, 1978 at Walter Reed Army Hospital, following the complications from Lung Cancer.[5] He is buried together with his wife Eloise McElroy Wehle (1911-1977) at Arlington National Cemetery.[6]

Decorations[edit]

Here is the ribbon bar of Major General Wehle:

Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze oak leaf cluster
1st Row Army Distinguished Service Medal Legion of Merit
2nd Row American Defense Service Medal Asiatic–Pacific Campaign Medal with one service star American Campaign Medal European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with four service stars
3rd Row World War II Victory Medal Army of Occupation Medal National Defense Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster South Korean Order of Military Merit, 2nd Class
Glider Badge

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "NHSAA Honorees", Norwalk High School
  2. ^ "apps.westpointaog.org". Archived from the original on July 23, 2016. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  3. ^ "Hall of Valor". Archived from the original on July 23, 2016. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  4. ^ "NHSAA Wall of Honor". Archived from the original on December 28, 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  5. ^ "The Washington Post". Archived from the original on July 23, 2016. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  6. ^ "Find a Grave Memorial". Archived from the original on December 28, 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-21.