Philip Dorling

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Philip Dorling
Occupation National Affairs and Defence Correspondent
Years active 2008 – present
Notable credit(s) Canberra Times

Philip Dorling is an author, and was engaged as a Visiting Fellow at the school of Humanities and Social Science in the Australian Defence Force Academy.[1]

Political career[edit]

After successfully completing a doctorate at Flinders University in South Australia,[2] Philip Dorling joined the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in 1992. Initially employed as a historian, he later took a role in policy – in particular being responsible for issues concerning both arms control and non-proliferation. In 1996, Dorling moved to become an advisor to Laurie Brereton, who at the time was serving as the Australian Labor Party's foreign affairs spokesman. He continued in this post until 2001, and while employed in this role Dorling was "especially engaged in policy relating to Indonesia and East Timorese self-determination".[1] While working with Laurie Brereton, on 16 September 2000, (the first day after the opening of the Sydney Olympics), Dorling's home was raided by the Australian Federal Police on allegations he had leaked confidential information about East Timor to the media.[3] Described in The Sydney Morning Herald as a "political witch hunt",[3] the police were searching for copies of approximately 80 documents,[3] although no evidence was found.[4] After leaving Laurie Brereton's office, Dorling spent two years (2002-2003) working as an advisor to Daryl Melham, the Shadow Minister for Justice and Customs. He was then briefly engaged in the Tasmanian Premier's department in 2003 before moving to the Australian Capital Territory's Chief Minister's department, where he worked until 2008.[1]

Post–politics[edit]

Upon leaving the Chief Minister's department, Dorling was engaged as the National Affairs Correspondent for The Canberra Times. Dorling was, however, once again caught up in controversy when the Australian Federal Police raided Dorling's home on 23 September 2008, after he quoted from classified briefing papers intended for the Australian Minister for Defence, Joel Fitzgibbon.[5][6] Police reportedly seized "several documents" as a result of their search.[7]

Publications[edit]

  • Dorling, Philip (1989). The Origins of the ANZUS Treaty: A Reconsideration. Adelaide: Flinders University. ISBN 0-7258-0442-4. 
  • Dorling, Philip, ed. (1994). Diplomasi: Australia and Indonesia's Independence: Documents 1947. Canberra: Australian Government Publication Service. ISBN 0-644-33249-2. 
  • Dorling, Philip; Lee, David, eds. (1996). Diplomasi: Australia and Indonesia's Independence: Documents 1948, The Renville Agreement. Canberra: Australian Government Publication Service. 
  • Dorling, Philip (1996). "South Australia and the Location of Commonwealth Defence Expenditure: The Case of the Submarine Project". In Parkin, Andrew. South Australia, Federalism and Public Policy. Canberra: Australian National University. ISBN 0-7315-2315-6. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Visiting Fellow: Dr Philip Dorling". Humanities and Social Science: Staff Directory. University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy. 1 September 2008. Retrieved 14 December 2008. 
  2. ^ Philip Dorling, (1995), At the brink the ANZUS allies in the off-shore islands crisis, 1954-1955 ; a diplomatic history, Flinders University of South Australia, unpublished PhD thesis
  3. ^ a b c Ramsey, Alan (20 September 2000). "The long hand of Mr Howard stretches too far". The Sydney Morning Herald. p. 11. 
  4. ^ Jennett, Greg (3 April 2003). "Inquiry launched into claim of bugging Labor MP (Transcript)". Lateline. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 14 December 2008. 
  5. ^ Veness, Peter (23 September 2008). "Police raid home of Canberra Times journalist Philip Dorling". Herald Sun. Retrieved 14 December 2008. 
  6. ^ Towell, Noel (23 September 2008). "Raid on journo's home 'unacceptable'". The Canberra Times. Retrieved 14 December 2008. 
  7. ^ Pearlman, Jonathan (24 September 2008). "Crackdown on journalist suggests past isn't dead". The Sydney Morning Herald. 

External links[edit]