Philip Kwame Apagya

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Philip Kwame Apagya (born 1958) is a Ghanaian photographer who specialises in colour studio portraits against painted backdrops.[1] He lives and works in Shama, Ghana.[2]

Life and career[edit]

Born in Sekondi, Ghana, Philip Kwame Apagya was the son of a photographer, and apprenticed in his father's studio as a boy. He studied photojournalism at the Accra School of Journalism before opening his own studio in Shama, on Ghana's west coast, in 1982.[3] He is known today for his studio portraits made using brightly colored backdrops.[4]

Apagya's work is in The Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC) of Jean Pigozzi.[5]

Apagya's works have been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, the Sheldon Art Galleries in Nebraska, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among other venues. His photographs are in many collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY.

Apagya is represented by Fifty One Fine Art Photography in Antwerp, Belgium.[6]

Exhibitions[edit]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

  • 2005: Rena Branston Gallery, San Francisco
  • 2004: Recent Photographs, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
  • 2003: Philip Kwame Apagya, Galerie Stähli, Zürich, Germany
  • 2002: Philip Kwame Apagya, Galerie Schuebbe, Düsseldorf, Germany
  • 2002: Apagya Portraits, Iwalewa-Haus, Bayreuth
  • 2002: Berlin Portraits by Philip Kwame Apagya, Goethe-Institut, Accra and Ghana National Museum, Accra
  • 2002: Philip Kwame Apagya, Alliance Francaise, Bahia
  • 2000: Philip Kwame Apagya Portraits, Galerie Forma Libera, Turin, Italy
  • 2000: Philip Kwame Apagya, Disegni Animati, Galerie Louisa delle Piane, Mailand

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Philip K. Apagya: Aspirational backgrounds in studio portraiture", Luminous-Lint.
  2. ^ Philip Kwame Apagya biography, Contemporary African Art Collection.
  3. ^ "Philip Kwame Apagya" bio, the National Museum of African Art.
  4. ^ Amy Griffin, "Exhibition offers a fresh, complex view of Africa", Times Union, 6 April 2012.
  5. ^ "Philip Kwame Apagya - Pigozzi Collection 2018". CAACART - The Pigozzi Collection. Retrieved 19 April 2018.
  6. ^ Philip K. Apagya page at Fifty One.

External links[edit]