Philip Leverhulme Prize

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The Philip Leverhulme Prize is awarded by the Leverhulme Trust to outstanding young scholars who have made an internationally recognised contribution in their field, and who are expected to make greater contributions later in their career.[1][2]

The award is named after Philip Leverhulme who died in 2000. He was the grandson of William Leverhulme, and was the third Viscount Leverhulme.[1] As of 2014, the prize stands at £100,000. The awards are payable, in instalments, over a period of two to three years.[1][2][3] Twenty-five prizes are awarded annually.[4][5]

Awards in 2001[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2001 are given below.[6]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Classics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Philosophy and Ethics

Awards in 2002[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2002 are given below.[7]

  • Software Technology for Information and Communications Technology
  • Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Modern History since 1800
  • Economics
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Awards in 2003[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2003 are given below.[8]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Classics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Philosophy and Ethics

Awards in 2004[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2004 are given below.[9]

  • Anthropology
  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Economics
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

Awards in 2005[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2005 are given below.[10]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages and Literature
  • Philosophy and Ethics

Awards in 2006[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2006 are given below.[11]

  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Zoology

Awards in 2007[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2007 are given below.[12]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages and Literature
  • Philosophy and Ethics

Awards in 2008[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2008 are given below.[13]

  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Medieval, Early Modern, And Modern History
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Zoology

Awards in 2009[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2009 are given below.[14]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages and Literature
  • Performing and Visual Arts

Awards in 2010[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2010 are given below.[15]

  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Law
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

Awards in 2011[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2011 are given below.[16]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages & Literatures
  • Performing & Visual Arts

Awards in 2012[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2012 are given below.[17]

  • Classics
  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Law
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

Awards in 2013[edit]

The research areas covered by the awards in 2013 are given below.[18]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Economics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern languages and Literature
  • Performing and Visual Arts

The disciplines selected are intentionally broad, and nominations will be considered irrespective of a nominee’s departmental affiliation.

In 2013, twenty-nine prizes where awarded,[19] going to: Dr Richard Alexander, Dr Stefan Kraus, Dr Mathew Owens, Dr Mark Swinbank, Dr John (Southworth) Taylor, Dr Jane Cooley Fruehwirth, Dr Haider Butt, Professor Bharathram Ganapathisubramani, Dr Eileen Gentleman, Dr Aline Miller, Dr Ferdinando Rodriguez y Baena, Dr Ben Anderson, Dr Dabo Guan, Dr Anna Lora-Wainwright, Dr Erin McClymont, Dr Colin McFarlane, Dr David Nally, Dr Lindsay Stringer, Dr Kathryn Banks, Dr Andrew Counter, Professor Sally Faulkner, Dr Lara Feigel, Dr David James, Dr James Smith, Dr Hannah Sullivan, Mr Martin John Callanan, Dr Nadia Davids, Dr James Moran, Dr Tim Smith

Awards in 2014[edit]

A list of winners can be found in:

http://leverhulme.ac.uk/templates/asset-relay.cfm?frmAssetFileID=1733


Eligibility[edit]

Awardees must work at a UK institution of higher education or research and should normally be under age 36.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes". 
  2. ^ a b Times Higher Education. "Grant Winners". 
  3. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prize". 
  4. ^ "£50,000 prize for galaxy hunter", BBC, December 2, 2005.
  5. ^ "Jobwatch: Two seats and 25 prizes", Times Higher Education, January 30, 2004.
  6. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2001". 
  7. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2002". 
  8. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2003". 
  9. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2004". 
  10. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2005". 
  11. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2006". 
  12. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2007". 
  13. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2008". 
  14. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2009". 
  15. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2010". 
  16. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2011". 
  17. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2012". 
  18. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2013". 
  19. ^ http://leverhulme.ac.uk/templates/asset-relay.cfm?frmAssetFileID=1548
  20. ^ The Leverhulme Trust. "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2012".