Philip Sansom

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Philip Sansom
British anarchist writer Philip Sansom (1916–1999).png
Photo of Sansom published 1945
Born
Philip Richard Sansom

(1916-09-19)19 September 1916
Died24 October 1999(1999-10-24) (aged 83)
London, England
OccupationWriter and editor
MovementAnarchist movement

Philip Richard Sansom (19 September 1916 – 24 October 1999) was a British anarchist writer and activist.[1][2]

Sansom began working life as a commercial artist. During the Second World War he was a conscientious objector, and worked in farming for a while. From 1943 he worked on War Commentary, a wartime substitute for the anarchist paper Freedom. With his co-editors Vernon Richards and John Hewetson, he was tried at the Old Bailey in 1945[2] and imprisoned for nine months for conspiring to publish an article allegedly inciting soldiers to disaffect from their duty or allegiance. He was a charismatic orator at Speakers' Corner, Hyde Park, and elsewhere in the 1950s and 1960s.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rooum, Donald (15 November 1999). "Philip Sansom". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  2. ^ a b Pilgrim, John (3 November 1999). "Obituary: Philip Sansom". The Independent. Archived from the original on 2022-05-26. Retrieved 21 June 2021.