Philip Schuyler (born 1836)

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Philip Schuyler
Philip Schuyler (1836-1906).jpg
Born(1836-06-20)June 20, 1836
DiedNovember 19, 1906(1906-11-19) (aged 70)
Resting placeSleepy Hollow Cemetery
Alma materHarvard University
University of Berlin
Spouse(s)
(m. 1872; his death 1906)
Parent(s)George Lee Schuyler
Eliza Hamilton
RelativesSee Schuyler family

Philip George Schuyler (June 20, 1836 – November 19, 1906) was a soldier, clubman, philanthropist, and prominent member of New York Society during the Gilded Age. Schuyler was a descendant of both the Hamilton and Schuyler family, of which he was the de facto head during his adulthood.[1]

Early life[edit]

Schuyler was born on June 20, 1836 in New York City. He was the only son of George Lee Schuyler (1811–1890) and Eliza Hamilton (1811–1863).[2] His parents were cousins through their shared Schuyler ancestry as his maternal great-grandmother was his paternal grandfather's sister.[3] After his mother died in 1863, his father married Mary Morris Hamilton (1815-1877), his former wife's sister.[1] His siblings included Louisa Lee Schuyler (1837–1926) and Georgina Schuyler (1841–1923).[4]

His paternal grandfather was U.S. Representative Philip Jeremiah Schuyler (1768–1835) and his maternal grandfather was acting Secretary of State James Alexander Hamilton (1788–1878).[3] His great-grandparents included Revolutionary War General Philip Schuyler and his wife, Catherine Van Rensselaer Schuyler, as well as Alexander Hamilton, the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, and his wife, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton (the sister of his paternal grandfather).[1]

He graduated from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University and the University of Berlin.[1]

Career[edit]

During the U.S. Civil War, Schuyler joined the U.S. Army fighting for the Union Army and fought in the Army of the Potomac,[5] serving alongside Robert Gould Shaw. He retired with the rank of Brigadier General.[1][6] He was also a member of the Seventh Regiment, New York National Guard.[2]

Schuyler was identified with the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company and was President of the New York Hospital.[1] Schuyler donated several rare Schuyler family treasures to the New-York Historical Society.[7] He was one of the founders of the Ardsley Casino.[8]

Society life[edit]

Schuyler was a prominent society figure who was featured in Ward McAllister's famous "Four Hundred".[9] He was known for his interest in sports and went grouse shooting in Scotland. He was on the Cup Committee of the New York Yacht Club when Lord Dunraven challenged for the America's Cup.[1] He was President of the Union Club of New York, member of the Knickerbocker Club, Harvard Club, Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club, the Hudson River Ice Yacht Club, and the St. Nicholas Society.[1]

He owned a large country home in Ardsley-on-Hudson.[1][10]

Personal life[edit]

On November 2, 1872,[11] Schuyler was married to Harriet (née Lowndes) Langdon (1838–1915), the daughter of Rawlins Lowndes (1801–1877) and Gertrude Livingston (1805–1883).[12] Through her father, she was a descendant of Rawlins Lowndes, the Governor of South Carolina, and through her mother, she was the granddaughter of Maturin Livingston, Recorder of New York City and a member of the prominent Livingston family. Harriet was previously married to Eugene Langdon (1831–1866), a member of the Astor family,[11] with whom she had two daughters: Marion Langdon (1864–1949) who married Royal Phelps Carroll,[13] and Anne Lowndes Langdon (1865–1943), who married Howard Townsend, Jr. (1859–1935).[1]

Schuyler died in a train wreck on November 19, 1906 in Lynchburg, Virginia.[1][14][8] He was buried at the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Tarrytown, New York.[15] His funeral was attended by many prominent citizens of the time, including J. Pierpont Morgan, Alexander Hamilton III, Joseph H. Choate, Ogden Mills, Gerald Hoyt, and Coleman Drayton.[15]

Legacy[edit]

After his death, his sister Louisa purchased several pieces of eighteenth century furniture "in memory of the late Major Philip Schuyler (1836-1906), who served in the Union Army through the Civil War, a great grandson of Major-General Philip Schuyler," for the Schuyler Mansion in Albany, New York.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "GEN. SCHUYLER, VETERAN, SPORTING AND CLUBMAN; Earned Brigadier General's Stars in Civil War. NEWS PROSTRATES HIS WIFE He Had Just Returned From Grouse Shooting in Scotland When He Was Killed". The New York Times. November 30, 1906. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Philip Schuyler (1836-1906)". www.nyhistory.org. New-York Historical Society. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  3. ^ a b Reynolds, Cuyler. Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Building of a Nation, Volume 3 pp. 1381-1385 Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1914 [1]
  4. ^ American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society (1919). Annual Report. J.B. Lyon Company. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  5. ^ "Melville, Battle-Pieces · Walt Whitman at the Lilly · The Lilly Library Online Exhibitions". www.indiana.edu. Indiana University. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  6. ^ Shaw, Robert Gould (2011). Blue-Eyed Child of Fortune: The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. University of Georgia Press. p. 128. ISBN 9780820342771. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  7. ^ The New-York Historical Society Quarterly Bulletin. The Society. 1918. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  8. ^ a b Times, Special To The New York (30 November 1906). "Article 9 -- No Title". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  9. ^ McAllister, Ward (16 February 1892). "THE ONLY FOUR HUNDRED | WARD M'ALLISTER GIVES OUT THE OFFICIAL LIST. HERE ARE THE NAMES, DON'T YOU KNOW, ON THE AUTHORITY OF THEIR GREAT LEADER, YOU UNDER- STAND, AND THEREFORE GENUINE, YOU SEE" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  10. ^ Times, Special To The New York (2 August 1906). "TAXES OF THE RICH PUT UP.; Assessment Rolls Near Tarrytown and Ardsley Radically Raised". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  11. ^ a b "THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHN JACOB ASTOR.; INCLUDING THE FAMILIES OF BRISTED, WARD, CHANLER, CARY, DE STUERS, DELANO, VAN ALEN, ROOSEVELT, DRAYTON, WILSON, LANGDON, RUMPFF, BORELL, WILKS, KANE, CARROLL, DE NOTBECK, AND JAY". The New York Times. 6 March 1898. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  12. ^ Prioleau, Horry Frost; Manigault, Edward Lining (2010). Register of Carolina Huguenots, Vol. 2, Dupre - Manigault. p. 924. ISBN 9780557242665. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  13. ^ "WEDDED IN IRVINGTON.; THE MARRIAGE OF MISS LANGDON AND ROYAL PHELPS CARROL". The New York Times. 4 March 1891. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  14. ^ Times, Special To The New York (30 November 1906). "SAMUEL SPENCER KILLED IN WRECK; Head of Southern Railway and Guests Crushed. GEN. SCHUYLER A VICTIM Eight Dead; Ten Injured, Near Lynchburg. GHOULS ROB THE DEAD Bodies of Charles D. Fisher and F.T. Redwood of Baltimore Burned with the Others in the Wreckage". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  15. ^ a b Times, Special To The New York (2 December 1906). "GEN. SCHUYLER BURIED FROM IRVINGTON HOME; Distinguished Company at Funeral of Virginia Wreck Victim. MANY MOURN FOR SPENCER Telegrams Received by Southern Railway Officials Show Widespread Grief at Death of Their President". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  16. ^ Society, American Scenic and Historic Preservation (1919). Annual Report. J.B. Lyon Company. p. 165. Retrieved 8 January 2018.

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