Philippine House of Representatives elections, 1998

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Philippine House of Representatives elections, 1998
Philippines
1995 ←
May 11, 1998 → 2001

All 257 seats in the House of Representatives (including underhangs)
129 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party Third party
  Representative Sonny Belmonte.jpg Manny Villar T'nalak Festival 2009.jpg
Leader Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. Manny Villar Raul Daza
Party Lakas LAMMP Liberal
Leader's seat Quezon City–3rd Las Piñas City-Lone Northern Samar–1st
Last election 100 seats, 40.7% LDP: 17 seats, 10.8%
PMP: 1 seat, 0.9%
5 seats, 1.9%
Seats won 111 55 15
Seat change Increase 11 Increase 37 Increase 10
Popular vote 11,981,024 6,520,744 1,773,124
Percentage 49.0% 26.7% 7.3%
Swing Increase 8.3% Increase 15.0% Increase 5.4%

Speaker before election

Jose de Venecia
Lakas

Elected Speaker

Manny Villar
LAMMP

Coat of arms of the Philippines.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Philippines

The Elections for the House of Representatives of the Philippines were held on May 11, 1998. Held on the same day as the presidential election, the party of the incumbent president, Fidel V. Ramos' Lakas-NUCD-UMDP, won majority of the seats in the House of Representatives.[1] For the first time since the People Power Revolution, a party won majority of the seats in the House; Lakas had a seat over the majority. This is also the first Philippine elections that included the party-list system.[2]

However, with Joseph Estrada of the opposition Laban ng Makabayang Masang Pilipino (LAMMP; an electoral alliance between the Partido ng Masang Pilipino (PMP), the NPC and the Laban ng Demokratikong Pilipino (LDP)) winning the presidential election, the majority of the elected Lakas-NUCD-UMDP congressmen switched sides to LAMMP. This led to Manny Villar (formerly of Lakas but became a LAMMP member prior to the election) on being elected as Speaker of the House

The elected representatives will serve in the 11th Congress from 1998 to 2001.

Results[edit]

Elections within each district were under the plurality system. In 1998 was the first party-list election. Previously, sectoral representatives were appointed by the president.

District Party-list
111 55 15 24 39 12
Lakas LAMMP LP Others PL [1]
1 Unfilled party-list seats


e • d Summary of the May 11, 1998 Philippine House of Representatives election results
Parties and coalitions Popular vote Seats won
Total  % Total  %
Lakas 11,981,024 49.0 111 50.2
LAMMP 6,520,744 26.7 55 24.9
Liberal 1,773,124 7.3 15 6.8
NPC 998,239 4.1 9 4.1
Reporma-LM 966,653 4.0 4 1.8
PROMDI 586,954 2.3 4 1.8
PDP-Laban 134,331 0.5 0 0.0
KAMPI 47,273 0.2 0 0.0
Ompia Party 46,462 0.2 1 0.5
KBL 35,522 0.0 0 0.0
PRP 38,640 0.0 0 0.0
PDSP 8,850 0.0 0 0.0
Lapiang Manggagawa 8,792 0.0 0 0.0
Nacionalista 4,412 0.0 0 0.0
PMP 2,010 0.0 0 0.0
Kilusan para sa Pambansang Pagpapabago 1,310 0.0 0 0.0
Not affiliated 348,281 1.4 4 1.8
Independent 834,934 3.4 2 0.9
Total 24,444,398 100.0 206 93.2
Source: Teehankee, Julio. "Electoral Politics in the Philippines" (PDF). quezon.ph. Retrieved 2010-12-11. 
e • d Summary of the May 11, 1998 Philippine House of Representatives election results
Party Popular vote Seats
won
Total  %
APEC 503,487 5.50% 3
ABA 321,646 3.51% 3
Alagad 312,500 3.41% 3
VFP 304,902 3.33% 3
PROMDI 255,184 2.79% 3
AKO 239,042 2.61% 3
NCSFO 238,303 2.60% 3
Abanse! Pinay 235,548 2.57% 3
Akbayan 232,376 2.54% 3
Butil 215,643 2.36% 3
Sanlakas 194,617 2.13% 3
Coop NATCCO 189,802 2.07% 3
Cocofed 186,388 2.04% 3
Senior Citizens 143,444 1.57% 0
Others 5,582,427 60.97% 0
Total 9,155,309 100% 39
Reference: Supreme Court

There were 51 seats for sectoral representatives that were contested. Each party has to get 2% of the national vote to win one seat; they'd win an additional seat for every 2% of the vote, up to the maximum three seats. Only 15 party-list representatives were elected under this rule. Eventually, the "2–4–6%" rule was ruled as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, and 24 more winners were proclaimed. The remaining 12 seats were never filled up.

See also[edit]

References[edit]