Philippine condiments

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

A number of condiments and sidedishes are used in Filipino cuisine. They include:

Atchara, made from pickled green papaya.
Buro with mustard leaves and eggplant.
  • Atchara - a sweet pickled papaya relish. Also used as a side dish.[1]
  • Bagoong - fermented anchovy paste or shrimp paste, particularly popular in the dish kare-kare.
  • Banana ketchup - a sweet, red condiment made primarily of bananas.
  • Buro or Balao-Balao - fermented rice which can be colored plain (Capampangan: balao-balao) or dark pink (Tagalog: buro) and sometimes with fish, mainly a condiment for steamed/ boiled vegetables like okra, sweet potato leaves (talbos ng kamote), eggplant, etc.
  • Calamansi - small Philippine limes
  • Eggplant sauce - a sour sauce made of grilled eggplant, garlic and vinegar. Used in cocidos and as a side dish.
  • Ensaladang mangga - green mango relish with tomatoes and onions.
  • Ensaladang talong - skinned grilled eggplant with tomatoes and onions.
  • Latik - (Visayan usage only) a thick syrup made from coconut milk and sugar.
  • Lechon sauce - also known as liver sauce or breadcrumb sauce made out of ground liver or liver pâté, vinegar, sugar, and spices. A sweet, tangy light-brown sauce used in roasts and the pork dish called lechon.
  • Palapa - a spicy Maranao condiment consisting of finely chopped sakurab (white scallions), ginger, labuyo chili, and grated coconut cooked briefly and stored. It can also be dried. It is usually sautéed before using, or added as an ingredient to other dishes.[2]
  • Patis. Sometimes spiced with labuyo peppers, or kalamansi lime juice, in which case it is called patismansi.
  • Labuyo chili - small native chili cultivar
  • Sukang may sili - cane or coconut vinegar spiced with labuyo peppers.
  • Sukang may toyo - cane or coconut vinegar with soy sauce. This may also contain the very hot labuyo peppers or onions. Sukang may toyo is used in the pork dish crispy pata.
  • Sweet and sour sauce - used on fried meats and spring rolls.
  • Taba ng talangka - fermented paste derived from the salted roe and aligue (reddish or orange crab "fat") of the river swimming crabs (talangka) sautéed in garlic and preserved in oil.
  • Toyo't Kalamansi (sometimes referred to simply as toyomansi) - soy sauce with kalamansi lime juice.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dagoon; et al. (1997). Culinary Arts II. Rex Bookstore, Inc. ISBN 978-971-23-2157-3.
  2. ^ Polistico, Edgie. "Palapa". Philippine Food Illustrated. Retrieved 5 March 2019.