Philippine general election, 2016

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2016 Philippine general election
Instructions on how to vote posted outside polling precincts during the election.
Presidency
Winner: Rodrigo Duterte (Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan, 39.01% of the vote)
Vice Presidency
Winner: Leni Robredo (Liberal Party, 35.11% of the vote)
Senate (24 seats; 12 up)
24 senators


House of Representatives (297 seats; all up)
297 representatives


Provincial (80 provinces; all up)
81 governors
Voter turnout
81.95%
Voter turnout during the election per province.
Coat of arms of the Philippines.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Philippines

A general election in the Philippines took place on May 9, 2016, for executive and legislative branches for all levels of government – national, provincial, and local, except for the barangay officials.

At the top of the ballot is the election for successors to Philippine President Benigno Aquino III and Vice President Jejomar Binay. There will also be elections for:[1]

The regional election for the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) are scheduled to be held on this date, but that may change if Bangsamoro Basic Law is passed creating Bangsamoro political entity to replace the ARMM. The ARMM elections pushed through, as scheduled.

Barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan elections were scheduled for October 2016, but were postponed to 2017.

Elections are organized, run, and adjudicated by the Commission on Elections better known as COMELEC with appeals under certain conditions allowed to the Regional Trial Courts, Congress of the Philippines or the Supreme Court of the Philippines sitting as the House of Representatives Electoral Tribunal, the Senate Electoral Tribunal, or the Presidential Electoral Tribunal.

Preparation[edit]

Commission on Elections membership[edit]

On May 4, 2015, President Benigno Aquino III appointed Presidential Commission on Good Government chairman Andres D. Bautista as chairman, and former Commission on Audit member Rowena Ganzon and Bangsamoro Business Club's board chairman Sherif Abas as commissioners. Bautista replaced Sixto Brillantes, while Guanzon and Abbas replaced Lucenito Tagle and Elias Yusoph, who all retired in February 2015. All appointees will serve until February 2022.[2]

A few days after the announcement, it was revealed that Abas is a nephew of Mohagher Iqbal, the chief negotiator of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. Bautista said the Abas confirmed to him that the latter is Iqbal's nephew. Iqbal neither confirmed nor denied their relationship, calling it is a non-issue, and that there's nothing wrong if he's nephew is appointed to a sensitive position.[3]

Bautista was confirmed by the Commission on Appointments on September 21; meanwhile, Abas' confirmation was deferred because Senator Alan Peter Cayetano, who was not present when Bautista was confirmed, still had questions to ask Abas.[4]

Voter registration[edit]

The commission started voter registration for the elections on May 6, 2014, to October 31, 2015. Under the law, the 9.6 million registered voters who do not have biometrics attached their registration will not be allowed to vote.[5] Voter registration was suspended from October 12 to 16 to give way to the filing of candidacies. From October 17 to 31, the commission would extend its hours up to 9:00 p.m. to accommodate last minute registrants.[6]

Voter registration was suspended in Puerto Princesa from April 20 to May 17, 2015, because the 2015 mayoral recall election. The Voters' Registration Act prohibits voter registration during recall elections.[7]

In June 2015, the commission denied reports that some voters' biometrics were lost saying that they were only "degraded," and that "two thousand" voters would have to have their biometrics taken again.[8] A month later, the commission opened booths in Metro Manila and Luzon to further registration. By that time, there were still 4.3 million voters with incomplete biometrics.[9] The commission, seeing the successful turnout for registration at the malls, mulled holding the elections itself inside such malls.[10] The commission's en banc had already approved "in principle" the mall voting process.[11] Near the end of the month, the commission said that the number of voters without biometrics has decreased to 3.8 million.[12]

By mid-August, the commission announced that they had purged 1.3 million records from the voters' list, including the deceased and voters who did not vote in the two immediate preceding elections, the 2013 general and 2013 barangay, and that voters without biometrics had fallen to 3.5 million.[13] By August 30, the number of registered voters without biometrics data had fallen to 3.1 million; this was after a Social Weather Stations poll came out that as much as 9.7 million people still had not updated their biometrics yet and could be disenfranchised.[14]

The Commission on Elections concluded the 17-month registration on October 31, and offered no extension, except for voters in Cagayan Valley which was devastated by Typhoon Lando who were given until the next day to finish theirs. This was despite a petition to the Supreme Court by the Kabataan party-list to extend registration until January 8, 2016.[15] Acting on the said petition, the Supreme Court issued a restraining order on the No Bio, No Boto mandatory voters biometrics campaign on December 1.[16] It was later lifted after 16 days.

Counting machines[edit]

The Philippines began using technology to streamline vote counting in 2010 when it automated its general elections. During the 2013 Mid Term elections it used the same technology, processing approximately 760 million votes cast by some 50 million voters. The 2016 general elections represented the largest electronic vote counting exercise in history as 92,509 vote counting machines were used to digitize voter-marked ballots and transmit the results to the Municipal Board of Canvassers.

The counting machines were leased from London-based Smartmatic after the Supreme Court of the Philippines invalidated the 300 million-peso contract between the Commission and the Smartmatic-TIM consortium for diagnostics and repair of 80,000 Precinct Count Optical Scan (PCOS) machines in April 2015. The court said that the commission "failed to justify its resort to direct contracting."[17]

Two months later, the Commission conducted a mock election where a "hybrid" system of manual counting and electronic transmission of results was tested out. Gus Lagman, former elections commissioner and a proponent of the hybrid system, pointed out the system's reliability, as opposed to full automation where the results can be manipulated, and to save money as well.[18] Meanwhile, the Commission overturned its self-imposed disqualification of Smartmatic from bidding on counting machines, but said that the company could only proceed with its bidding once they decided on what counting system to use.[19]

Senator Francis Escudero disapproved of the use of the hybrid system, saying "it brings back memories of the Hello Garci controversy".[20] A few days later, the Commission informed the House of Representatives Committee on Suffrage and Electoral Reforms that they had decided not to use the hybrid system. They also limited their options into two: refurbishing 80,000 counting machines and leasing 23,000 more, or lease all machines.[21]

On a House of Representatives committee hearing held on late July, Elections chairman Andres Bautista told lawmakers that the Commission had decided to award Smartmatic-TIM a 1.7 billion peso contract to lease 23,000 OMR counting machines.[22] Days later, the Commission declared the bidding for the refurbishing 80,000 machines as a failure, after two of the three bidders backed out, while the third was disqualified. The companies that withdrew noted the Commission's tight schedule, citing that the project would be unfeasible at that timeline.[23]

On August 13, the Commission agreed to lease 94,000 new OMR machines for 7.9 billion pesos, while the old machines used for 2010 and 2013 elections would be used for the 2019 elections.[24]

By September, the Commission sought the transfer the site manufacturing the voting machines from China to Taiwan after it received intelligence reports from the military in July that China might sabotage the elections. Smartmatic, the manufacturer of the machines, acquiesced to the request. China, meanwhile, denied any plans of sabotaging the election, calling it "sheer fabrication."[25] Smartmatic also won the contract worth P500 million for the electronic results transmission services of the voting machines.[26]

The Commission partnered with De La Salle University to conduct the source code review starting in October. It was said to be more comprehensive than the 2010 and 2013 reviews, which were done a month and four days before the election, respectively.[27]

The warehouse of the voting machines and the paper bins was moved to the warehouse of a bus company Jam Liner in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. The Commission paid 69 million pesos for renting the warehouse.[28] On March 4, the Commission unanimously voted to disallow the issuance of voting receipt to voters, although onscreen verification was allowed, which would take an additional 15 seconds per voter.[29]

The Commission eventually aborted mall voting and allowed the use of replacement ballots.[30]

Results transmission[edit]

Election authorities, with the help of election services provider Smartmatic, created a Virtual private network (VPN) for the secure and reliable transmission of electoral data. To guarantee nationwide coverage, Smartmatic coordinated the main telecom companies in the Philippines.

This VPN was used to transmit the votes of over 44 million citizens from 36.805 polling centres. On election night, 4 hours after the polls closed, 80% vote counting machines had transmitted the election data, setting a new record for the Philippines.[31]

Speed was one of the main reasons why Philippine authorities decided to automate elections. As an archipelago comprising over 7 thousand islands, several of which lack a proper communications infrastructure, the transmission of results posed a challenge.

Bans[edit]

Gun Ban[edit]

The election gun ban was implemented starting from January 9, 2016, the official start of the 90-day election period. Francisco Pobe, regional director of COMELEC-13, also pointed out that the candidate should not bring bodyguards without gun ban exemption.[32] Go Act, a pro-gun group formed by gun owners filed a petition before the Supreme Court to fully stop the implementation of the election gun ban.[33]

Calendar[edit]

On August 18, 2015, the commission released the calendar of activities for the May 9, 2016 national and local elections:[34]

Activity Start End Length of time
Voter registration May 6, 2014 October 31, 2015 15.5 months
Holding of political conventions September 12, 2015 September 30, 2015 25 days
Filing of candidacies and nominees of party-list groups October 12, 2015 October 16, 2015 5 days
Election period January 10, 2016 June 15, 2016 6 months
Campaign period for president, vice president, senators and party-lists February 9, 2016 May 7, 2016 3 months
Campaign period for district representatives and local officials March 26, 2016 1.5 months
Campaign ban for Holy Week March 24, 2016 March 25, 2016 2 days
Casting of ballots of overseas absentee voters April 9, 2016 May 9, 2016 1 month
Casting of ballots of local absentee voters April 27, 2016 April 29, 2016 3 days
Campaign ban May 8, 2016 May 9, 2016 2 days
Election Day 6:00 a.m. of May 9, 2016 5:00 p.m. of May 9, 2016 11 hours
Term of office winning candidates for local officials and representatives June 30, 2016 June 30, 2019 3 years
Term of office winning candidates for president, vice president and senators June 30, 2022 6 years
First session day of the 17th Congress and State of the Nation Address July 25, 2016 N/A

Following a request by the Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines, the commission extended the period for holding of political conventions to October 8, 2015.[35] The commission isn't expected to extend the deadline of filing of candidacies, though.[36]

The commission originally envisioned to release an "almost" final list of candidates on December 15, but postponed it to December 23.[37] The commission did release a "final list" of vice presidential candidates on December 23, but Chairman Andres D. Bautista that disqualification cases on other positions led them to postpone the release to January 20, when the commission is expected to resolve all disqualification cases.[38]

On January 21, the commission released an "initial" list of candidates for all positions. The list is subject to trimming as the disqualification cases on presidential, vice presidential and senatorial cases are to be resolved with finality.[39]

Debates[edit]

The Commission on Elections held three debates for presidential candidates--in Mindanao last February 2016, in Visayas last March 2016, and in Luzon last April 2016. A vice-presidential debate was also held in Metro Manila last April 10, 2016.[40]

The commission identified the media entities who had covered the debates: GMA Network (E16: Eleksyon 2016) and Philippine Daily Inquirer (February 21), TV5 (Bilang Pilipino: Boto sa Pagbabago 2016 - English: As a Filipino: Vote for Change 2016) and Philippine Star (March 20), CNN Philippines (The Filipino Votes), Business Mirror, and Rappler (April 10), and ABS-CBN (Halalan 2016: Ipanalo ang Pamilyang Pilipino - English: Election 2016: Winning the Filipino Family) and Manila Bulletin (April 24).[41]

The commission also encourages non-governmental organizations to hold debates for Senate and local positions.

Results[edit]

Rodrigo Duterte of PDP-Laban and Leni Robredo of the Liberal Party won the presidential and vice presidential elections, respectively. The Liberals also won a plurality of seats in both houses of Congress, but several of the Liberal Party members of the House of Representatives jumped ship to Duterte's PDP-Laban, allowing his party to create a supermajority coalition that put Pantaleon Alvarez into the Speakership. The Senate leadership was ultimately won by PDP-Laban's Koko Pimentel, with the Liberals ultimately comprising the minority bloc there. The election of Alvarez and Pimentel meant that PDP-Laban currently holds three of the four elected highest political offices, for the first time since 1986 when the Kilusang Bagong Lipunan held the offices of the presidency, vice presidency, parliamentary speaker and prime minister.

For president[edit]

Results of the presidential election per province, denoting the provinces and cities won by each candidate.

The winner of the presidential election will succeed President Benigno Aquino III, as he is term limited. A separate election will also be held to determine the Vice Presidency; Jejomar Binay can choose to defend the vice presidency, but ran for president instead. Both elections are under the plurality voting system.


e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine presidential election results
Candidate Party Votes %
Rodrigo Duterte Partido Demokratiko Pilipino–Lakas ng Bayan
(Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power)
16,601,997 39.01%
Mar Roxas Liberal Party 9,978,175 23.45%
Grace Poe Independent 9,100,991 21.39%
Jejomar Binay United Nationalist Alliance 5,416,140 12.73%
Miriam Defensor Santiago People's Reform Party 1,455,532 3.42%
Total 42,552,835 100%
Valid votes 42,552,835 94.61%
Roy Señeres[p 1] Partido ng Manggagawa at Magsasaka (Workers' and Peasants' Party) 25,779 0.06%
Total invalid votes 2,426,316 5.39%
Votes cast 44,979,151 81.5%
Registered voters 55,739,911 100%
  1. ^ Withdrew on February 5, 2016, and died three days later. All of his votes are to be considered as spoiled votes.

For vice president[edit]

Results of the vice presidential election per province, denoting the provinces and cities won by each candidate.
e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine vice presidential election results
Candidate Party Votes %
Leni Robredo Liberal Party 14,418,817 35.11%
Bongbong Marcos Independent [v 1] 14,155,344 34.47%
Alan Peter Cayetano Independent [v 2] 5,903,379 14.38%
Francis Escudero Independent 4,931,962 12.01%
Antonio Trillanes Independent [v 3] 868,501 2.11%
Gringo Honasan United Nationalist Alliance 788,881 1.92%
Total 41,066,884 100%
Valid votes 41,066,884 91.30%
Invalid votes 3,912,267 8.70%
Votes cast 44,979,151 81.5%
Registered voters 55,739,911 100%
  1. ^ Member of Nacionalista Party, which does not field an official candidate; Miriam Defensor Santiago's (PRP) guest candidate for vice president
  2. ^ Member of Nacionalista Party, which does not field an official candidate; Rodrigo Duterte's (PDP-Laban) guest candidate for vice president
  3. ^ Member of Nacionalista Party, which does not field an official candidate; supported by Magdalo and endorsed Grace Poe for President

Congress[edit]

Senate[edit]

Provincial results of the Senate election, denoting which party won a plurality of votes per province; Metro Manila at the inset. Note that seats are allocated on the nationwide vote.

The seats contested in the 2016 election, or 12 seats of the Senate of the Philippines, are up for election. The Philippines uses plurality-at-large voting to determine the winning candidates. With the country as one at-large "district", the twelve candidates with the highest number of votes shall join the winners of the 2013 election in the Senate.

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine Senate election results per party
Party Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Not up Gains Holds Losses Won Current 16th 17th +/−
Start %
Liberal (Liberal Party) 100,512,795 31.30% Increase 19.98% 8 3 1 3 2 1 5 4 6 25.0% Increase 2
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 32,154,139 10.07% Decrease 0.08% 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 2 3 12.5% Increase 1
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 24,660,722 7.64% Decrease 19.33% 6 2 3 1 0 2 1 5 4 16.0% Decrease 1
Akbayan (Citizens' Action Party) 15,915,213 4.97% Increase 1.29% 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4.2% Increase 1
Lakas (People Power-Christian Muslim Democrats) 13,056,845 4.08% Increase 4.08% 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0.0% Decrease 2
PMP (Force of the Philippine Masses) 11,932,700 3.73% Increase 3.73% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Aksyon (Democratic Action) 8,433,168 2.62% Increase 2.62% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Makabayan (Patriotic Coalition of the People) 6,484,985 2.02% Increase 0.58% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 2,775,191 0.85% Decrease 14.45% 1 2 3 0 0 2 0 5 3 4.2% Decrease 2
PMM (Workers' and Farmers' Party) 2,470,660 0.76% Increase 0.76% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
KBL (New Society Movement) 1,971,327 0.61% Increase 0.61% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) Not participating 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 4.2% Steady
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party – People's Power) Not participating 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 4.2% Steady
PRP (People's Reform Party) Not participating 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0.0% Decrease 1
Independent 100,939,528 31.36% Increase 15.12% 22 1 2 3 0 1 3 3 5 29.2% Increase 2
Total 319,308,507 N/A 50 12 12 9 3 9 12 24 24 100% TBD
Turnout 44,979,151 80.69% Increase 4.92%
Registered voters 55,739,911 100%

House of Representatives[edit]

Results of the House of Representative elections. The map refers to congressional district results, with Metro Manila is denoted at the inset, and party-list election results, denoted by boxes to the right.

All seats of the House of Representatives will be up for election. There are two types of representatives: the district representatives, which are 80% of the members, will be elected in the different legislative districts via the plurality system; each district sends one representative. The party-list representatives will be elected via closed lists, with the parties having at least 2% of the vote winning at least one seat, and no party winning more than three seats. If the winning candidates don't surpass 20% of the members, other parties that got less than 2% of the national vote will get one seat each until all party-lists have been filled up.

District elections[edit]
e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine House of Representatives election results for representatives from congressional districts
Party/coalition Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Entered Up Gains Holds Losses Wins Elected % +/−
Liberal (Liberal Party) 15 552 401 41.72% 164 111 15 96 15 4 115 38.7% Decrease 4
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 6 350 310 17.04% 77 42 8 33 9 0 42 14.1% Increase 4
NUP (National Unity Party) 3 604 266 9.67% 39 26 1 22 4 0 23 7.7% Decrease 3
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 3 512 975 9.42% 46 27 3 21 6 0 24 8.1% Decrease 2
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 2 468 335 6.62% 47 8 4 7 1 0 11 3.7% Increase 1
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power) 706 407 1.90% 26 0 3 0 0 0 3 1.0% Increase 3
Lakas (People Power–Christian Muslim Democrats) 573 843 1.54% 5 7 0 4 3 0 4 1.3% Decrease 1
Aksyon (Democratic Action) 514 612 1.38% 8 1 1 0 1 0 1 0.3% Steady
KBL (New Society Movement) 198 754 0.53% 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Asenso Manileño (Progress for Manilans) 184 602 0.50% 4 0 2 0 0 0 2 0.7% Increase 2
Kusog Baryohanon (Force of the Villagers) 172 601 0.46% 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
PTM (Voice of the Masses Party) 145 417 0.39% 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
PCM (People's Champ Movement) 142 307 0.38% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
Bukidnon Paglaum (Hope for Bukidnon) 129 678 0.35% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
Lingap Lugud (Caring Love) 127 762 0.34% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
Padayon Pilipino (Onward Filipinos) 127 759 0.34% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
1-Cebu (One Cebu) 114 732 0.31% 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% Steady
LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) 111 086 0.30% 2 2 0 2 0 0 2 0.7% Steady
ASJ (Forward San Joseans) 83 945 0.23% 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
PMP (Force of the Filipino Masses) 78 020 0.21% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
KABAKA (Partner of the Nation for Progress) 72 130 0.19% 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
Hugpong (Party of the People of the City) 53 186 0.14% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
SZP (Forward Zambales Party) 52 415 0.14% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
CDP (Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines) 13 662 0.04% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% Steady
PMM (Workers' and Peasants' Party) 7 239 0.02% 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
PGRP (Philippine Green Republican Party) 4 426 0.01% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Independent 2 172 562 5.83% 178 3 3 1 2 0 4 1.3% Increase 1
Vacancy 3 0 0 3 0 0.0% Decrease 3
Total 37 275 432 100% 634 234 45 189 45 4 238 80.1% Increase 4
Valid votes 37 275 432 83.97%
Invalid votes 7 077 692 15.94%
Turnout 44 392 375 81.66%
Registered voters (without overseas voters) 54 363 844 100%
Party-list election[edit]
e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine House of Representatives election results for party-list representatives
Party Popular vote Seats
Total % Swing Up Won +/−
Ako Bicol 1,664,975 5.14% Increase 2.38% 2 3 Increase 1
GABRIELA 1,367,795 4.22% Increase 1.64% 2 2 Steady
1-PACMAN 1,310,197 4.05% Increase 4.05% 0 2 Increase 2
ACT Teachers 1,180,752 3.65% Increase 2.00% 1 2 Increase 1
Senior Citizens 988,876 3.05% Increase 0.60% 2 2 Steady
Kabayan 840,393 2.60% Increase 2.60% 0 2 Increase 2
AGRI 833,821 2.58% Increase 1.25% 1 2 Increase 1
PBA 780,309 2.41% Increase 1.64% 0 2 Increase 2
Buhay 760,912 2.35% Decrease 2.25% 3 2 Decrease 1
Abono 732,060 2.26% Decrease 0.52% 2 2 Steady
AMIN 706,689 2.18% Increase 0.80% 1 2 Increase 1
Coop-NATCCO 671,699 2.07% Decrease 0.25% 2 2 Steady
Akbayan 608,449 1.88% Decrease 1.12% 2 1 Decrease 1
Bayan Muna 606,566 1.87% Decrease 1.58% 2 1 Decrease 1
AGAP 593,748 1.83% Decrease 0.31% 2 1 Decrease 1
An Waray 590,895 1.82% Decrease 0.13% 2 1 Decrease 1
CIBAC 555,760 1.72% Decrease 0.40% 2 1 Decrease 1
AAMBIS-Owa 495,483 1.53% Increase 0.40% 1 1 Steady
Kalinga 494,725 1.53% Increase 0.18% 1 1 Steady
A TEACHER 475,488 1.47% Decrease 2.31% 2 1 Decrease 1
YACAP 471,173 1.46% Increase 0.13% 1 1 Steady
DIWA 467,794 1.44% Increase 0.21% 1 1 Steady
TUCP 467,275 1.44% Increase 0.11% 1 1 Steady
Abang Lingkod 466,701 1.44% Increase 0.50% 1 1 Steady
LPGMA 466,103 1.44% Increase 0.10% 1 1 Steady
Alona 434,856 1.34% Increase 1.34% 0 1 Increase 1
1-SAGIP 397,064 1.23% Increase 0.18% 1 1 Steady
Butil 395,011 1.22% Decrease 0.37% 1 1 Steady
ACTS-OFW 374,601 1.16% Increase 1.16% 0 1 Increase 1
Anakpawis 367,376 1.13% Decrease 0.03% 1 1 Steady
Ang Kabuhayan 348,533 1.08% Increase 1.08% 0 1 Increase 1
ANGKLA 337,245 1.04% Decrease 0.26% 1 1 Steady
Mata 331,285 1.02% Increase 0.14% 0 1 Increase 1
1-CARE 329,627 1.02% Decrease 2.37% 2 1 Decrease 1
ANAC-IP 318,257 0.98% Increase 0.11% 1 1 Steady
ABS 301,457 0.93% Decrease 0.37% 1 1 Steady
Kabataan 300,420 0.93% Decrease 0.31% 1 1 Steady
BH 299,381 0.92% Increase 0.24% 0 1 Increase 1
AASENSO 294,281 0.91% Increase 0.67% 0 1 Increase 1
SBP 280,465 0.87% Increase 0.87% 0 1 Increase 1
Magdalo 279,356 0.86% Decrease 1.19% 2 1 Decrease 1
1-ang Edukasyon 278,393 0.86% Increase 0.86% 0 1 Increase 1
Manila Teachers 268,613 0.83% Increase 0.83% 0 1 Increase 1
Kusug Tausug 247,487 0.76% Increase 0.76% 0 1 Increase 1
Aangat Tayo 243,266 0.75% Decrease 0.00% 0 1 Increase 1
Agbiag! 240,723 0.74% Decrease 0.13% 1 1 Steady
Ating Guro 237,566 0.73% Decrease 0.04% 0 0 Steady
ADDA 226,751 0.70% Increase 0.70% 0 0 Steady
A.I. 223,880 0.69% Increase 0.69% 0 0 Steady
All-Fish 220,599 0.68% Increase 0.68% 0 0 Steady
Append 219,218 0.68% Decrease 0.18% 1 0 Decrease 1
Ang Nars 218,593 0.68% Decrease 0.21% 1 0 Decrease 1
ABAKADA 216,405 0.67% Decrease 0.22% 1 0 Decrease 1
CONSLA 213,814 0.66% Increase 0.66% 0 0 Steady
Tingog Sinirangan 210,552 0.65% Increase 0.65% 0 0 Steady
ABAMIN 209,276 0.65% Decrease 1.04% 1 0 Decrease 1
OFW Family 203,767 0.63% Decrease 2.09% 2 0 Decrease 2
Anakalusugan 191,362 0.59% Increase 0.59% 0 0 Steady
Alay Buhay 186,712 0.58% Decrease 0.57% 1 0 Decrease 1
Abante Retirees 166,138 0.51% Decrease 0.07% 0 0 Steady
AAB 162,547 0.50% Increase 0.50% 0 0 Steady
AVE 157,792 0.49% Decrease 0.49% 1 0 Decrease 1
RAM 153,743 0.47% Increase 0.47% 0 0 Steady
KGB 148,869 0.46% Increase 0.46% 0 0 Steady
AGHAM 140,661 0.43% Decrease 0.04% 0 0 Steady
AWAT Mindanao 138,040 0.43% Increase 0.28% 0 0 Steady
Tama 136,555 0.42% Increase 0.42% 0 0 Steady
Asean, Inc. 125,069 0.39% Increase 0.39% 0 0 Steady
Amepa Ofw 121,086 0.37% Increase 0.37% 0 0 Steady
ATING Koop 120,361 0.37% Decrease 0.60% 1 0 Decrease 1
Ang Kasangga 120,042 0.37% Decrease 0.36% 0 0 Steady
UMALAB KA 118,149 0.36% Increase 0.20% 0 0 Steady
Disabled/PWD 118,043 0.36% Increase 0.36% 0 0 Steady
Global 117,552 0.36% Increase 0.36% 0 0 Steady
ALE 112,052 0.35% Decrease 0.21% 0 0 Steady
Cancer 109,965 0.34% Increase 0.34% 0 0 Steady
ACT-CIS 109,300 0.34% Decrease 1.03% 1 0 Decrease 1
AMA 102,583 0.32% Decrease 0.57% 1 0 Decrease 1
Marino 102,430 0.32% Increase 0.32% 0 0 Steady
1-PABAHAY 100,746 0.31% Decrease 0.11% 0 0 Steady
Metro 94,515 0.29% Increase 0.29% 0 0 Steady
PISTON 89,384 0.28% Decrease 0.36% 0 0 Steady
Sanlakas 87,351 0.27% Decrease 0.04% 0 0 Steady
TGP 87,009 0.27% Increase 0.27% 0 0 Steady
KAP/KAKASA-KA 79,178 0.24% Increase 0.24% 0 0 Steady
Migrante 76,523 0.24% Increase 0.05% 0 0 Steady
Amor-seaman 68,226 0.21% Increase 0.21% 0 0 Steady
1-AALALAY 65,459 0.20% Decrease 0.39% 0 0 Steady
Sinag 61,393 0.19% Increase 0.19% 0 0 Steady
Akin 56,809 0.18% Increase 0.18% 0 0 Steady
1-AHAPO 54,550 0.17% Increase 0.17% 0 0 Steady
Ang Prolife 53,078 0.16% Decrease 0.31% 0 0 Steady
Samako 52,251 0.16% Increase 0.16% 0 0 Steady
Tricap 50,401 0.16% Increase 0.16% 0 0 Steady
Unido 49,742 0.15% Increase 0.15% 0 0 Steady
Clase 49,212 0.15% Increase 0.15% 0 0 Steady
Tinderong Pinoy 46,942 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
Pbb 46,853 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
Kamais Pilipinas 46,521 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
1-GB 46,182 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
KMM 42,935 0.13% Increase 0.13% 0 0 Steady
PM 42,742 0.13% Increase 0.13% 0 0 Steady
KM Ngayon Na 39,777 0.12% Increase 0.12% 0 0 Steady
FICTAP 36,619 0.11% Increase 0.11% 0 0 Steady
ACP 35,270 0.11% Increase 0.11% 0 0 Steady
Banat 31,185 0.10% Increase 0.10% 0 0 Steady
A Tambay 30,147 0.09% Increase 0.09% 0 0 Steady
Awake 28,727 0.09% Increase 0.09% 0 0 Steady
Nactodap 24,407 0.08% Increase 0.08% 0 0 Steady
Anupa 18,793 0.06% Increase 0.06% 0 0 Steady
Melchora 17,040 0.05% Increase 0.05% 0 0 Steady
1-ABILIDAD 16,805 0.05% Decrease 0.02% 0 0 Steady
MTM PHILS 9,200 0.03% Decrease 0.12% 0 0 Steady
CWS 9,121 0.03% Increase 0.03% 0 0 Steady
Dumper PTDA 6,941 0.02% Increase 0.02% 0 0 Steady
Total 32,377,841 100.00% N/A 58 59 Increase 1
Valid votes 32,377,841 71.98% Increase 3.15%
Invalid votes 12,601,310 28.02% Decrease 3.15%
Total turnout 44,980,362* 80.70% Increase 4.93%
Registered voters 55,739,911 100.00% Increase 5.21%

*1,211 votes are unaccounted for.


Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao[edit]

A general election in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) was held on May 9, 2016. A regional governor and a regional vice governor are to be elected via the plurality system, while regional assembly members are elected via plurality-at-large voting.

However, there had been moves to replace the ARMM with Bangsamoro, of which a referendum for its creation has to be carried out first. The bill to enact the Bangsamoro Basic Law, which shall be used to hold the plebiscite of the new autonomous region, is still pending in Congress.[42] Unlike the ARMM government structure which mimics the presidential system of governance, the Bangsamoro would be structured into a parliamentary system of government.[43]

Results summary
Governor Vice governor Regional legislative assembly
Liberal Liberal
24 seats



Local[edit]

Gubernatorial elections result.

Local elections are to be held in all provinces, cities and municipalities. Executive posts are to be elected in the plurality system, while elections for the membership of the local legislatures are via plurality-at-large voting.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  9. ^ Bueza, Michael (2015-07-01). "Malls open voters' registration booths". Rappler.com. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
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  26. ^ "Comelec: Intel shows China may sabotage 2016 polls". GMA News. 26 November 2015. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
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  28. ^ Gotinga, JC (January 29, 2016). "LOOK: Laguna warehouse of vote counting machines". CNN Philippines. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  29. ^ Dioquino, Rose-An Jessica (2016-03-04). "Comelec formalizes unanimous stand versus ballot receipts". GMA News Online. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
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  32. ^ Crismundo, Mike (January 3, 2016). "Comelec total gun ban to start on January 9, 2016". Manila Bulletin. Retrieved March 22, 2016. 
  33. ^ Punay, Edu (January 12, 2016). "Pro-gun group asks SC to stop gun ban". The Philippine Star. Retrieved March 22, 2016. 
  34. ^ INQUIRER.net. "Comelec sets election calendar towards May 2016 polls". newsinfo.inquirer.net. Retrieved 2015-08-21. 
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  42. ^ Casauay, Angela (2015-05-05). "'Bangsamoro law first; not FOI, anti-dynasty bills'". Rappler.com. Retrieved 2015-07-25. 
  43. ^ "Key points of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro". Interkaksyon.com. Agence France-Press. 2014-03-27. Retrieved 2015-07-25.