Linguistic film theory

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Linguistic film theory[1] is a form of film theory that studies the aesthetics of film by investigating the concepts and practices that comprise the experience and interpretation of movies.

Overview[edit]

Linguistic film theory was proposed by Stanley Cavell[1] and it is based on the philosophical tradition begun by late Ludwig Wittgenstein.

Critics from this tradition often clarify misconceptions used in theoretical film studies[2][3] and instead produce analysis of a film's vocabulary and its link to a form of life.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Dualist Vols. 1–6, Department of Philosophy, Stanford University, 1994, p. 56.
  2. ^ David Bordwell; Noël Carroll, eds. (1996). Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. p. 109. 
  3. ^ Annette Kuhn and Guy Westwell (2012). "Post-theory" in A Dictionary of Film Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bibliography[edit]

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