Phoenix Open

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Phoenix Open
Tournament information
Location Scottsdale, Arizona
Established 1932, 84 years ago
Course(s) TPC Scottsdale
Par 71
Length 7,261 yards (6,639 m)
Organized by The Thunderbirds
Tour(s) PGA Tour
Format Stroke play
Prize fund $6.5 million
Month played February
Tournament record score
Aggregate 256 Mark Calcavecchia (2001)
256 Phil Mickelson (2013)
To par −28 Mark Calcavecchia (2001)
−28 Phil Mickelson (2013)
Current champion
Japan Hideki Matsuyama
TPC Scottsdale is located in USA
TPC Scottsdale
TPC Scottsdale
Location in the United States
TPC Scottsdale is located in Arizona
TPC Scottsdale
TPC Scottsdale
Location in Arizona

The Phoenix Open (known as the Waste Management Phoenix Open for title sponsorship reasons)[1] is a professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour, held in late January/early February at the Tournament Players Club (TPC) of Scottsdale, Arizona. The tournament was originally the Arizona Open, but was known for most of its history as the Phoenix Open until the investment bank Friedman Billings Ramsey became the title sponsor in October 2003, when it was known as the FBR Open. The Phoenix Open is called “The Greatest Show on Grass”.

History[edit]

The Phoenix Open began 84 years ago in 1932 but was discontinued after the 1935 tournament. The rebirth of the Phoenix Open came in 1939 when Bob Goldwater, Sr. convinced fellow Thunderbirds to help run the event. The Thunderbirds, a prominent civic organization in Phoenix, were not as enthusiastic about running the event as he was, leaving Goldwater, Sr. to do most of the work in getting a golf open started. The event was played at the Phoenix Country Club in Phoenix, both in its earlier incarnations and after Goldwater resuscitated it. Beginning in 1955, the Arizona Country Club (also in Phoenix) alternated as event host with Phoenix Country Club; this arrangement lasted until Phoenix Country Club took The Arizona Country Club's turn in 1975 and became the event's permanent home again.

The tournament was moved in 1987 to its current home, the Stadium Course at TPC Scottsdale, northeast of downtown Phoenix. The approximate average elevation of the course is 1,530 feet (470 m) above sea level.

The four-day attendance of the tournament is usually around a half million. The most popular location for spectators is the par-3 16th hole, with is "Amphitheatre" atmosphere, created by the stands erected every year before the tournament. The hole could be described as "one big party," with many students from the nearby Arizona State University in Tempe. Poor shots at the 16th hole receive boos, because the hole is very easy by the PGA's standards. Good shots, however, are cheered for loudly. Famous moments at the 16th include Tiger Woods' hole-in-one in 1997, which caused the gallery to erupt, throwing cups and other objects in celebration, and Justin Leonard giving the finger to the gallery after a poor shot. In 2011 Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle aced the hole, causing the stands to erupt in excitement.

The most popular golfer at the Waste Management Phoenix Open is unquestionably Phil Mickelson, an Arizona State alumnus. In addition to the golf, there is a concert/party held in the Scottsdale area called the Birds Nest, at which music artists like Huey Lewis and the News play.

It is the best-attended event in golf. In 2016, it set a PGA Tour and Phoenix Open single day attendance record with 201,003 fans in attendance on Saturday, February 6 and set a tournament week attendance record of 618,365 fans.[2]

The Thunderbirds are still highly active in the organization of the tournament. Portions of the proceeds are used by the Thunderbirds to fund Special Olympics activities in Phoenix.

In recent years, the Phoenix Open has been played on the weekend of the Super Bowl. In 1996, the tournament was played Wednesday through Saturday, as Super Bowl XXX was held at Sun Devil Stadium in nearby Tempe. In 2009, the tournament overlapped with Super Bowl XLIII in Tampa, Florida, when Kenny Perry and Charley Hoffman went to a playoff. That denied the spectators a chance to watch the beginning of the game on NBC, featured the local Arizona Cardinals. Because of the Super Bowl weekend status, the PGA Tour's television contracts with CBS and NBC include an alternating tournament. Usually a CBS tournament, the Phoenix Open airs on NBC when CBS has the Super Bowl, and NBC's WGC-Dell Match Play Championship airs on CBS in Winter Olympic years.

Records – scoring and victories[edit]

The tournament's lowest 72-hole score was set by Mark Calcavecchia in 2001 with 256 (–28), which was matched by Mickelson in 2013. In the second round Calcavecchia scored a 60 (–11), which equalled the lowest score at the Phoenix Open (by Grant Waite in 1996) and subsequently matched by Mickelson in 2005 and 2013. Calcavecchia had 32 birdies in the tournament, which was also an all-time record.

There have been only two double eagles in the history of the Phoenix Open. Tom Pernice, Jr. made the first one on the 558-yard par-5 15th hole in 1990. Andrew Magee scored the second on the 332-yard par-4 17th hole in 2001. Magee's shot is believed to be the first-ever hole in one on a par-4 in PGA Tour history.

Four men have won three times at the Phoenix Open: Arnold Palmer won three consecutive (1961, 1962, 1963), then Gene Littler (1955, 1959, 1969), Calcavecchia (1989, 1992, 2001), and Mickelson (1996, 2005, 2013).

Winners[edit]

Year Player Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up 1st prize ($) Purse ($)
Waste Management Phoenix Open
2016 Hideki Matsuyama  Japan 270 −14 Playoff United States Rickie Fowler 1,170,000 6,500,000
2015 Brooks Koepka  United States 269 −15 1 stroke Japan Hideki Matsuyama
United States Ryan Palmer
United States Bubba Watson
1,134,000 6,300,000
2014 Kevin Stadler  United States 268 −16 1 stroke Canada Graham DeLaet
United States Bubba Watson
1,116,000 6,200,000
2013 Phil Mickelson (3)  United States 256 −28 4 strokes United States Brandt Snedeker 1,116,000 6,200,000
2012 Kyle Stanley  United States 269 −15 1 stroke United States Ben Crane 1,098,000 6,100,000
2011 Mark Wilson  United States 266 −18 Playoff United States Jason Dufner 1,098,000 6,100,000
2010 Hunter Mahan  United States 268 −16 1 stroke United States Rickie Fowler 1,080,000 6,000,000
FBR Open
2009 Kenny Perry  United States 270 −14 Playoff United States Charley Hoffman 1,080,000 6,000,000
2008 J. B. Holmes (2)  United States 270 −14 Playoff United States Phil Mickelson 1,080,000 6,000,000
2007 Aaron Baddeley  Australia 263 −21 1 stroke United States John Rollins 1,080,000 6,000,000
2006 J. B. Holmes  United States 263 −21 7 strokes United States J. J. Henry
United States Steve Lowery
United States Ryan Palmer
United States Scott Verplank
Colombia Camilo Villegas
936,000 5,200,000
2005 Phil Mickelson (2)  United States 267 −17 5 strokes United States Scott McCarron
United States Kevin Na
936,000 5,200,000
2004 Jonathan Kaye  United States 266 −18 2 strokes United States Chris DiMarco 936,000 5,200,000
Phoenix Open
2003 Vijay Singh (2)  Fiji 261 −23 3 strokes United States John Huston 720,000 4,000,000
2002 Chris DiMarco  United States 267 −17 1 stroke United States Kenny Perry
Japan Kaname Yokoo
720,000 4,000,000
2001 Mark Calcavecchia (3)  United States 256 −28 8 strokes United States Rocco Mediate 720,000 4,000,000
2000 Tom Lehman  United States 270 −14 1 stroke Australia Robert Allenby
United States Rocco Mediate
576,000 3,200,000
1999 Rocco Mediate  United States 273 −11 2 strokes United States Justin Leonard 540,000 3,000,000
1998 Jesper Parnevik  Sweden 269 −15 3 strokes United States Tommy Armour III
United States Brent Geiberger
United States Steve Pate
United States Tom Watson
450,000 2,500,000
1997 Steve Jones  United States 258 −26 11 strokes Sweden Jesper Parnevik 270,000 1,500,000
1996 Phil Mickelson  United States 269 −15 Playoff United States Justin Leonard 234,000 1,300,000
1995 Vijay Singh  Fiji 269 −15 Playoff United States Billy Mayfair 234,000 1,300,000
1994 Bill Glasson  United States 268 −16 3 strokes United States Bob Estes 216,000 1,200,000
1993 Lee Janzen  United States 273 −11 2 strokes United States Andrew Magee 180,000 1,000,000
1992 Mark Calcavecchia (2)  United States 264 −20 5 strokes United States Duffy Waldorf 180,000 1,000,000
1991 Nolan Henke  United States 268 −16 1 stroke United States Gil Morgan
United States Curtis Strange
United States Tom Watson
180,000 1,000,000
1990 Tommy Armour III  United States 267 −17 5 strokes United States Jim Thorpe 162,000 900,000
1989 Mark Calcavecchia  United States 263 −21 7 strokes United States Chip Beck 126,000 700,000
1988 Sandy Lyle  Scotland 269 −15 Playoff United States Fred Couples 117,000 650,000
1987 Paul Azinger  United States 268 −16 1 stroke United States Hal Sutton 108,000 600,000
1986 Hal Sutton  United States 267 −17 2 strokes United States Calvin Peete
United States Tony Sills
90,000 500,000
1985 Calvin Peete  United States 270 −14 2 strokes United States Morris Hatalsky
United States Doug Tewell
81,000 450,000
1984 Tom Purtzer  United States 268 −16 1 stroke United States Corey Pavin 72,000 400,000
1983 Bob Gilder (2)  United States 271 −13 Playoff United States Rex Caldwell
United States Johnny Miller
United States Mark O'Meara
63,000 350,000
1982 Lanny Wadkins  United States 263 −21 6 strokes United States Jerry Pate 54,000 300,000
1981 David Graham  Australia 268 −16 1 stroke United States Lon Hinkle 54,000 300,000
1980 Jeff Mitchell  United States 272 −12 4 strokes United States Rik Massengale 54,000 300,000
1979 Ben Crenshaw  United States 199* −14 1 stroke United States Jay Haas 33,750 250,000
1978 Miller Barber  United States 272 −12 1 stroke United States Jerry Pate
United States Lee Trevino
40,000 200,000
1977 Jerry Pate  United States 277 −7 Playoff United States Dave Stockton 40,000 200,000
1976 Bob Gilder  United States 268 −16 2 strokes United States Roger Maltbie 40,000 200,000
1975 Johnny Miller (2)  United States 260 −24 14 strokes United States Jerry Heard 30,000 150,000
1974 Johnny Miller  United States 271 −13 1 stroke United States Lanny Wadkins 30,000 150,000
1973 Bruce Crampton  Australia 268 −12 1 stroke United States Steve Melnyk
United States Lanny Wadkins
30,000 150,000
1972 Homero Blancas  United States 273 −11 Playoff United States Lanny Wadkins 25,000 125,000
Phoenix Open Invitational
1971 Miller Barber  United States 261 −23 2 strokes United States Billy Casper
United States Dan Sikes
25,000 125,000
1970 Dale Douglass  United States 271 −13 1 stroke United States Howie Johnson
United States Gene Littler
20,000 100,000
1969 Gene Littler (3)  United States 263 −21 2 strokes United States Miller Barber
United States Don January
United States Billy Maxwell
20,000 100,000
1968 George Knudson  Canada 272 −12 3 strokes United States Julius Boros
United States Sam Carmichael
United States Jack Montgomery
20,000 100,000
1967 Julius Boros  United States 272 −12 1 stroke United States Ken Still 14,000 70,000
1966 Dudley Wysong  United States 278 −6 1 stroke United States Gardner Dickinson 9,000 60,000
1965 Rod Funseth  United States 274 −14 3 strokes United States Bert Yancey 10,500 65,000
1964 Jack Nicklaus  United States 271 −13 3 strokes United States Bob Brue 7,500 50,000
1963 Arnold Palmer (3)  United States 273 −15 1 stroke South Africa Gary Player 5,300 35,000
1962 Arnold Palmer (2)  United States 269 −15 12 strokes United States Billy Casper
United States Don Fairfield
United States Bob McCallister
United States Jack Nicklaus
5,300 35,000
1961 Arnold Palmer  United States 270 −10 Playoff United States Doug Sanders 4,300 30,000
1960 Jack Fleck  United States 273 −11 Playoff United States Bill Collins 3,150 22,500
1959 Gene Littler (2)  United States 268 −12 1 stroke United States Art Wall, Jr. 2,400 20,000
1958 Ken Venturi  United States 274 −10 1 stroke United States Walter Burkemo
United States Jay Hebert
2,000 15,000
1957 Billy Casper  United States 271 −9 3 strokes United States Cary Middlecoff
United States Mike Souchak
2,000 15,000
Phoenix Open
1956 Cary Middlecoff  United States 276 −8 3 strokes United States Mike Souchak 2,400 15,000
1955 Gene Littler  United States 275 −5 1 stroke United States Billy Maxwell
United States Johnny Palmer
2,400 15,000
1954 Ed Furgol  United States 272 −12 Playoff United States Cary Middlecoff 2,000 10,000
1953 Lloyd Mangrum (2)  United States 272 −12 6 strokes United States Johnny Bulla
United States Ted Kroll
United States Bo Wininger
2,000 10,000
1952 Lloyd Mangrum  United States 274 −10 5 strokes United States E. J. Harrison 2,000 10,000
1951 Lew Worsham  United States 272 −12 1 stroke United States Lawson Little 2,000 10,000
Ben Hogan Open
1950 Jimmy Demaret (2)  United States 269 −15 1 stroke United States Sam Snead 2,000 10,000
Phoenix Open
1949 Jimmy Demaret  United States 278 −6 Playoff United States Ben Hogan 2,000 10,000
1948 Bobby Locke  South Africa 268 −16 1 stroke United States Jimmy Demaret 2,000 10,000
1947 Ben Hogan (2)  United States 270 −14 7 strokes United States Lloyd Mangrum
United States Ed Oliver
2,000 10,000
1946 Ben Hogan  United States 273 −11 Playoff United States Herman Keiser 1,500 7,500
1945 Byron Nelson (2)  United States 274 −10 2 strokes United States Denny Shute 1,000 5,000
1944 Jug McSpaden  United States 273 −11 Playoff United States Byron Nelson 1,000 5,000
1941–43: No tournament (hosted Western Open in 1941 and 1942)
1940 Ed Oliver  United States 205^ −8 1 stroke United States Ben Hogan 700 3,000
1939 Byron Nelson  United States 198^ −15 12 strokes United States Ben Hogan 700 3,000
1936–38: No tournament
1935 Ky Laffoon  United States 281 −3 4 strokes United States Craig Wood 500 2,500
1934 No tournament
Arizona Open
1933 Harry Cooper  United States 281 −3 2 strokes United States Ray Mangrum
United States Horton Smith
400 1,500
1932 Ralph Guldahl  United States 285 −1 5 strokes United States John Perelli 600 2,500

*Rain-shortened to 54 holes
^Scheduled 54 holes
Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.
Sources[3][4][5]

Multiple winners[edit]

Thirteen men have won this tournament more than once.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Waste Management to sponsor Phoenix Open". PGA Tour. December 9, 2009. Retrieved March 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Waste Management Phoenix Open attendance records". AZ Central. February 7, 2016. 
  3. ^ 2015 Waste Management Phoenix Open Media Guide – Section 14: Top Finishers 1932–2014 – at wmphoenixopen.com
  4. ^ Phoenix Open – Winners – at www.pgatour.com
  5. ^ Phoenix Open – Winners – at golfobserver.com

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°38′17″N 111°54′40″W / 33.638°N 111.911°W / 33.638; -111.911