Phosphirane

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Phosphirane
Phosphirane.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Phosphirane
Systematic IUPAC name
Phosphacyclopropane
Other names
Phosphiran
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/C2H5P/c1-2-3-1/h3H,1-2H2
    Key: UTMQOVWWMLZKRY-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C1PC1
Properties
C2H5P
Molar mass 60.036 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless gas
Melting point −121 °C (−186 °F; 152 K)
Boiling point 36.5 °C (97.7 °F; 309.6 K)[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Phosphirane is the organophosphorus compound with the formula C2H4PH. It is a colorless gas of no commercial value. As the simplest cyclic, saturated organophosphorus compound, phosphirane is the prototype of a family of related compounds that have attracted attention from the research community. Phosphirane was first prepared by reaction of 1,2-dichloroethane with the conjugate base of phosphine.[2] Phosphiranes, that is substituted phosphirene compounds where one or more of the H's are replaced organic substituents, are far more commonly discussed than the parent phosphirane.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wagner, Ross I.; Freeman, LeVern D.; Goldwhite, H.; Rowsell, D. G. (March 1967). "Phosphiran". Journal of the American Chemical Society. 89 (5): 1102–1104. doi:10.1021/ja00981a013.
  2. ^ François Mathey, Manfred Regitz (1996). "Phosphiranes, Phosphirenes, and Heavier Analogues". Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry II. Vol. 1A. pp. 277–304. doi:10.1016/B978-008096518-5.00008-3. ISBN 9780080965185.{{cite encyclopedia}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  • Quin, L. D. (2000). A Guide to Organophosphorus Chemistry. Wiley-Interscience. ISBN 0-471-31824-8.