Phyllostachys bambusoides

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Phyllostachys bambusoides
Poaceae - Phyllostachis bambusoides.JPG
Phyllostachys bambusoides at the botanical garden of Villa Durazzo-Pallavicini, Genova Pegli
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Poales
Family: Poaceae
Genus: Phyllostachys
Species: P. bambusoides
Binomial name
Phyllostachys bambusoides
Synonyms
  • Phyllostachys quiloi
  • Phyllostachys reticulata non Rupr.
  • Phyllostachys sulphurea 'All Gold'.

Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.

Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes,[1] and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts and crafts.

Description[edit]

Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. Leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. One plant produced culms growing a remarkable 47.6 inches (121 cm) in 24 hours.[2] The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years.[3][4] This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboo for building and in the manufacture of furniture.[citation needed]

Distribution[edit]

This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yung, Perry (2009). "What is madake bamboo?". www.yungflutes.com. 
  2. ^ Robert Austin and Koichiro Ueda, BAMBOO (New York: Walker/Weatherhill, 1970) p. 193.
  3. ^ Veller, Carl; Nowak, Martin A.; Davis, Charles C. (July 2015). "Letter: Extended flowering intervals of bamboos evolved by discrete multiplication" (PDF). Ecology Letters. 18 (7). ISSN 1461-023X. Retrieved April 2016.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  4. ^ Carl Zimmer (May 15, 2015). "Bamboo Mathematicians". National Geographic. Retrieved April 2016.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)

External links[edit]