Phytosphingosine

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Phytosphingosine
Chemical structure of phytosphingosine
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
(2S,3S,4R)-2-Aminooctadecane-1,3,4-triol
Other names
  • Hydroxysphinganine
  • D-ribo-Phytosphingosine
  • (4R)-Hydroxysphinganine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
1725301
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.103.588 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 439-210-6
KEGG
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C18H39NO3/c1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-17(21)18(22)16(19)15-20/h16-18,20-22H,2-15,19H2,1H3/t16-,17+,18-/m0/s1
    Key: AERBNCYCJBRYDG-KSZLIROESA-N
  • CCCCCCCCCCCCCC[C@H]([C@H]([C@H](CO)N)O)O
Properties
C18H39NO3
Molar mass 317.514 g·mol−1
Melting point 102–103 °C (216–217 °F; 375–376 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS05: CorrosiveGHS09: Environmental hazard
Danger
H318, H410
P273, P280, P305+P351+P338, P310, P391, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Phytosphingosine is a sphingoid base, a fundamental building block of more complex sphingolipids. It is abundant in plants and fungi and present in animals.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Park, Moon-Taek; Kang, Jung A.; Choi, Jung-A.; Kang, Chang-Mo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Sujong; Choi, Weon-Ik (February 2003). "Phytosphingosine induces apoptotic cell death via caspase 8 activation and Bax translocation in human cancer cells". Clinical Cancer Research. 9 (2): 878–885. ISSN 1078-0432. PMID 12576463.