Pie Jesu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

"Pie Jesu" (original Latin: Pie Iesu) is a text from the final couplet of the hymn, "Dies irae", and often included in musical settings of the Requiem Mass as a motet.

Popular settings[edit]

Marc-Antoine Charpentier has composed four "Pie Jesu": H 427 (1675), H 234 (1670), H 263 (1690), H 269 (1695 ?). The settings of the Requiem Mass by Luigi Cherubini, Gabriel Fauré, Maurice Duruflé, John Rutter, Karl Jenkins, Kim André Arnesen and Fredrik Sixten include a "Pie Jesu" as an independent movement. Of all these, by far the best known is the "Pie Jesu" from Fauré's Requiem. Camille Saint-Saëns said of Fauré's "Pie Jesu" that "Just as Mozart's is the only 'Ave verum corpus', this is the only 'Pie Jesu'."[1]

Andrew Lloyd Webber's setting of "Pie Jesu" in his Requiem (1985) has also become well known and has been widely recorded.

Text[edit]

The original text, derived from the "Dies irae" sequence, is as follows:

Pie Jesu Domine,
Dona eis requiem. (×2)

Pie Jesu Domine,
Dona eis requiem sempiternam.

Pious Lord Jesus,
Give them rest.

Pious Lord Jesus,
Give them everlasting rest.

Andrew Lloyd Webber's Requiem[edit]

Andrew Lloyd Webber, in his Requiem, combined the text of the "Pie Jesu" with the version of the "Agnus Dei" from the Tridentine Requiem Mass:

Pie Jesu, (×4)
Qui tollis peccata mundi,
Dona eis requiem. (×2)

Agnus Dei, (×4)
Qui tollis peccata mundi,
Dona eis requiem, (×2)
Sempiternam (×2)
Requiem.

Pious Jesus,
Who takes away the sins of the world,
Give them rest.

Lamb of God,
Who takes away the sins of the world,
Give them rest,
Everlasting
Rest.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Steinberg, Michael. "Gabriel Fauré: Requiem, Op. 48." Choral Masterworks: A Listener's Guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005, 131–137.

External links[edit]