Piero Carini

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Piero Carini
Born (1921-03-06)6 March 1921
Genoa, Italy
Died 30 May 1957(1957-05-30) (aged 36)
Saint-Étienne, France
Formula One World Championship career
Nationality Italy Italian
Active years 1952 - 1953
Teams Ferrari inc. non-works
Entries 3
Championships 0
Wins 0
Podiums 0
Career points 0
Pole positions 0
Fastest laps 0
First entry 1952 French Grand Prix
Last entry 1953 Italian Grand Prix

Piero Carini (March 6, 1921 – May 30, 1957) was a racing driver from Italy. He was born in Genoa and died in Saint-Étienne, France.[1]

Racing career[edit]

Carini finished third in the 1950 Modena Grand Prix, run that year to Formula Two rules, driving an OSCA.[1] However, the car proved unreliable in 1951 but he achieved enough to be invited to join Scuderia Marzotto for 1952, to drive their Ferrari sports and Grand Prix cars.[1] Despite only competing in two Grands Prix (debuting on 6 July 1952) and retiring from both, Carini did well enough to be signed by the works Ferrari team for 1953, effectively as a "junior" driver alongside Umberto Maglioli.[1] However he only competed in the Italian Grand Prix and at the end of the season moved to Alfa Romeo for 1954, to drive their touring cars achieving class wins in the Mille Miglia, the Tour of Sicily and the Dolomite Cup.[1]

In 1955 Carini drove a Ferrari to class wins at Dakar and Caracas, Venezuela, and an OSCA to a class win in the Targa Florio.

In 1957, driving in a sports car race, near Saint-Étienne, France, with a Ferrari Testa Rossa, Carini's car crossed the central reservation and collided with another competitor killing him instantly.[1]

Complete Formula One World Championship results[edit]

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 WDC Points
1952 Scuderia Marzotto Ferrari 166 Ferrari V12 SUI 500 BEL FRA
Ret
GBR GER
Ret
NED ITA NC 0
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 553 Ferrari V12 ARG 500 NED BEL FRA GBR GER SUI ITA
Ret
NC 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 95. ISBN 0851127029.