Piet Aalberse Sr.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Piet Aalberse)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Piet Aalberse
PietAalberse1871-1948.jpg
Piet Aalberse in 1918
Member of the Council of State
In office
10 November 1937 – 1 April 1946
Vice PresidentFrans Beelaerts
van Blokland
Speaker of the House of Representatives
In office
7 May 1936 – 9 November 1937
Preceded byCharles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck
Succeeded byJosef van Schaik
Leader of the Roman
Catholic State Party
In office
31 May 1933 – 11 November 1937
Preceded byCharles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck
Succeeded byLaurentius Nicolaas
Deckers
Parliamentary leader in the
House of Representatives
In office
15 September 1931 – 7 May 1936
Preceded byWillem Hubert Nolens
Succeeded byCarel Goseling
Parliamentary groupRoman Catholic
State Party
Minister of Labour,
Commerce and Industry
In office
1 January 1923 – 4 August 1925
Prime MinisterCharles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck
Preceded byCharles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck

as Minister of Agriculture,
Commerce and Industry

Himself
as Minister of Labour
Succeeded byDionysius Koolen
Minister of Labour
In office
25 September 1918 – 1 January 1923
Prime MinisterCharles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck
Preceded byOffice established
Succeeded byHimself
as Minister of Labour,
Commerce and Industry
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
15 September 1925 – 9 November 1937
In office
24 February 1903 – 21 June 1916
Parliamentary groupRoman Catholic
State Party

(1926–1937)
General League of
Roman Catholic
Caucuse

(1903–1926)
Personal details
Born
Petrus Josephus Mattheus Aalberse

(1871-03-27)27 March 1871
Leiden, Netherlands
Died5 July 1948(1948-07-05) (aged 77)
The Hague, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyCatholic People's Party
(from 1945)
Other political
affiliations
Roman Catholic
State Party
(1926–1945)
General League of
Roman Catholic
Caucuse
(until 1926)
Spouse(s)
Elisabeth Schmier
(m. 1898; his death 1948)
ChildrenPiet Aalberse Jr. (1910–1989)
and 7 daughters
Alma materLeiden University
(Bachelor of Laws, Master of Laws)
OccupationPolitician · Civil servant · Jurist · Lawyer · Prosecutor · Researcher · Academic administrator · Nonprofit director · Editor · Author · Professor

Petrus Josephus Mattheus "Piet" Aalberse Sr. (27 March 1871 – 5 July 1948) was a Dutch politician of the defunct General League of Roman Catholic Caucuses (ABRK) later the Roman Catholic State Party (RKSP) and later co-founder of the Catholic People's Party (KVP) now merged into the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) party and jurist. He was granted the honorary title of Minister of State on 31 December 1934.[1]

Alberse applied at the Leiden University in June 1891 majoring in Law and obtaining an Bachelor of Laws degree in July 1893 and worked as a student researcher before graduating with an Master of Laws degree in July 1897. Alberse worked as a lawyer in Leiden from August 1897 until April 1901. Alberse also worked as editor of the newspapers De Tijd and the De Maasbode from November 1898 until 25 September 1918. Alberse served on the Municipal Council of Leiden from September 1899 until September 1918 and served as an Alderman in Leiden from September 1901 until February 1903. Alberse became a Member of the House of Representatives after the death of Herman Schaepman, serving from 24 February until 21 June 1916. Alberse worked as a professor of Administrative law and Labour law at the Delft Institute of Technology from 21 June 1916 until 25 September 1918. After the election of 1918 Alberse was appointed as the first Minister of Labour in the Cabinet Ruijs de Beerenbrouck I, taking office on 25 September 1918. After the election of 1922 Alberse continued as Minister of Labour in the Cabinet Ruijs de Beerenbrouck II, taking office on 18 September 1922. On 1 January 1923 the Ministry of Labour and the Ministry of Agriculture, Commerce and Industry where combined to form the Ministry of Labour, Commerce and Industry with Alberse continuing in the post as the newly renamed Minister of Labour, Commerce and Industry. After the election of 1925 Alberse was not giving a cabinet post in the new cabinet, the Cabinet Ruijs de Beerenbrouck II was replaced by the Cabinet Colijn I on 4 August 1925. Alberse subsequently returned as Member of the House of Representatives as a frontbencher, taking office on 15 September 1925. After the Leader of the Roman Catholic State Party and Parliamentary leader of the Roman Catholic State Party in the House of Representatives Willem Hubert Nolens announced his retirement from national politics Charles Ruijs de Beerenbrouck was nominated as his successor as Leader and Alberse was selected as Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives, taking office on 15 September 1931. After the Leader of the Roman Catholic State Party Charles Ruijs de Beerenbrouck was elected as Speaker of the House of Representatives he subsequently stepped down as Leader in favor of Alberse on 31 May 1933.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

He was born in Leiden to confectioner Bartholomeus Hendricus Johannes Aalberse and Johanna Kerkvliet. He attended a catholic elementary school in Katwijk and studied Dutch Language and Jurisprudence at Leiden University. After graduating in 1897, Aalberse became a lawyer and attorney in Leiden.

Politics[edit]

Alderman and House of Representatives[edit]

Aalberse was elected into the municipal council of Leiden in 1899, and became alderman of Marital Status, Social Affairs and Public Hygiene of the city in 1901. He gave up both positions in 1903, when he was elected into the House of Representatives for the constituency of Almelo. In the House, he was mainly concerned with policy regarding labour, trade and industry. After losing his seat in 1916, Aalberse briefly taught at the Delft University of Technology.

Minister[edit]

In 1918, Aalberse became the Netherlands' first minister of Labour, a position renamed minister of Labour, Trade and Industry in 1922. As minister, Aalberse was responsible for the introduction of child benefits for public servants, the introduction of a subsidy programme to stimulate private construction of residences, and the fixing of eight-and-a-half-hour work days and 48-hour working weeks. His term ended in 1925. After serving as minister, Aalberse returned to the House of Representatives.

Speaker of the House and Council of State[edit]

In the House, he was leader of the Catholic group from 1931 to 1936, and served as Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1936 to 1937, when he lost his seat. Aalberse ended his political career as member of the Council of State, from 1937 to 1946.

Personal[edit]

On 21 July 1898, Aalberse married Elisabeth Johanna Maria Schmier, with whom he had seven daughters and one son. He was member of the "Raad der Vereniging" of De Nederlandsche Padvinders from 1936 till 1947.

Decorations[edit]

Honours
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
NLD Order of the Dutch Lion - Knight BAR.png Knight of the Order of the Netherlands Lion Netherlands 24 February 1911
NLD Order of Orange-Nassau - Commander BAR.png Commander of the Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands 31 August 1938 Elevated from Officer (31 August 1911)
Honorific Titles
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Minister of State Netherlands 31 December 1934 Style of Excellency

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Aalberse, Petrus Josephus Mattheus (1871-1948)" (in Dutch). Huygens ING. 12 November 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2019.
  • Schemmel, B. "Netherlands ministries, etc". Rulers.org. Retrieved 2007-02-16.
  • Maassen, Joop. "Petrus Josephus Mattheus Aalberse". Biografisch Woordenboek van het Socialisme en de Arbeidersbeweging in Nederland (in Dutch). Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis. Retrieved 2007-02-16.
  • Doel en werkwijze. De Nederlandse Padvinders.

External links[edit]

House of Representatives of the Netherlands
Preceded by
Herman Schaepman
Member for Almelo
1903–1916
Succeeded by
Arnold Engels
Party political offices
Preceded by
Willem Hubert Nolens
Parliamentary leader of the
Roman Catholic State Party
in the House of Representatives

1931–1936
Succeeded by
Carel Goseling
Preceded by
Charles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck
Leader of the Roman
Catholic State Party

1933–1937
Succeeded by
Laurentius Nicolaas
Deckers
Political offices
Preceded by
Office established
Minister of Labour
1918–1923
Succeeded by
Himself
as Minister of Labour,
Commerce and Industry
Preceded by
Charles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck

as Minister of Agriculture,
Commerce and Industry

Himself
as Minister of Labour
Minister of Labour,
Commerce and Industry

1923–1925
Succeeded by
Dionysius Koolen
Preceded by
Charles Ruijs de
Beerenbrouck
Speaker of the House
of Representatives

1936–1937
Succeeded by
Josef van Schaik
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Unknown
Chairman of
The Catholic Scouts

1938–1947
Succeeded by
Unknown