Pilatus P-1

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P-1
Pilatus P-1 Ansicht.jpeg
Sketch of the Pilatus P-1
Role single-seat military trainer
National origin Switzerland
Manufacturer Pilatus Aircraft
Number built 0

The Pilatus P-1 was a single-engined, single-seat training aircraft project from Pilatus Aircraft in Switzerland, ca.1941.[1]

Design and development[edit]

External images
Pilatus P-1
Pilatus P-1 Plan
A Pilatus P-2 converted to a Pilatus P-1

The P-1 project began around the end of October 1940 as the first project of Pilatus, influenced by engineer Henri Fiert. The layout and design principles were carried through to the Pilatus P-2, which achieved success as a trainer with the Swiss Air Force. The fuselage structure of the P-1 would have consisted of welded steel tube, with removable front aluminium alloy panels and fabric covering aft of the cockpit. The wings would have been of wood built up around a one-piece wooden spar with plywood skinning.[2]

Specifications (P-1 estimated)[edit]

Data from Pilatus Flugzeuge: 1939–1989[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 6.9 m (22 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.2 m (30 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.1 m (6 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 12.7 m2 (137 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 850 kg (1,874 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,150 kg (2,535 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As 10E2 V-8 inverted air-cooled piston engine, 180 kW (240 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 325 km/h (202 mph, 175 kn)
  • Service ceiling: 6,000 m (20,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 6.5 m/s (1,280 ft/min)

See also[edit]

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pilatus Chronik (PDF) (in German). Stans: Pilatus. 2011. p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Eichenberger, Roland (1989). Pilatus Flugzeuge: 1939–1989 (in German). Stans: Pilatus Flugzeugwerk.

References[edit]

  • Eichenberger, Roland (1989). Pilatus Flugzeuge: 1939–1989 (in German). Stans: Pilatus Flugzeugwerk.
  • Pilatus Chronik (PDF) (in German). Stans: Pilatus. 2011. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04.