Pine Ridge, Mississippi

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Pine Ridge, Mississippi
Unincorporated community
Pine Ridge Presbyterian Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places
Pine Ridge, Mississippi is located in Mississippi
Pine Ridge, Mississippi
Pine Ridge, Mississippi
Pine Ridge, Mississippi is located in the US
Pine Ridge, Mississippi
Pine Ridge, Mississippi
Coordinates: 31°37′44″N 91°20′42″W / 31.62889°N 91.34500°W / 31.62889; -91.34500Coordinates: 31°37′44″N 91°20′42″W / 31.62889°N 91.34500°W / 31.62889; -91.34500
Country United States
State Mississippi
County Adams
Elevation 279 ft (85 m)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
GNIS feature ID 675866[1]

Pine Ridge is an unincorporated community in Adams County, Mississippi, United States.[1]

Located approximately 7 mi (11 km) northeast of Natchez, the settlement is older than the state of Mississippi.

History[edit]

A land grant was issued by the British government for Pine Ridge in 1771, in territory then known as British West Florida.[2] Early settlers were of Scottish heritage.[3]

Mount Repose in Pine Ridge was built in 1824 by William Bisland, a plantation owner. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[4]

One of the first cotton gins in Mississippi was erected at Pine Ridge in 1798 by Thomas Wilkins.[5][6]

The Pine Ridge Presbyterian Church moved to Pine Ridge in 1808, and a session house was built next to the church in 1829. Church elders would conduct business at the session house, and a school was located there until 1904 when a public school was established in the area. The session house is likely the only extant structure of its kind in the state, while the church is the oldest active Presbyterian church in Mississippi. In the early 1830s, a branch of the church was formed to serve the local African-American community. The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, and a Mississippi historic marker is located there.[7][8][9]

Pine Ridge Plantation was established at the settlement in the early 1800s by the Pipes family.[10]

The first annual conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi took place at the home of William Foster in Pine Ridge in 1816.[11][12]

Two military companies from Pine Ridge served in the American Civil War.[13]

A chapter of the National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry was formed in Pine Ridge in 1873.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Pine Ridge
  2. ^ Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Mississippi. 1. Goodspeed. 1891. p. 68. 
  3. ^ The WPA Guide to Mississippi: The Magnolia State. Viking Press. 1938. 
  4. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form - Mount Repose" (PDF). National Park Service. August 22, 1979. 
  5. ^ Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Mississippi. 2. Goodspeed. 1891. p. 111. 
  6. ^ Rowland, Dunbar (1907). Mississippi: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. 1. Southern Historical Publishing Association. p. 572. 
  7. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination form - Pine Ridge Church" (PDF). National Park Service. August 22, 1979. 
  8. ^ Savage, Beth L. (1994). African American Historic Places. John Wiley & Sons. p. 298. 
  9. ^ "Mississippi Historic Marker". Mississippimarkers.com. Retrieved November 6, 2016. 
  10. ^ Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Mississippi, Part 2. 2. Goodspeed. 1891. p. 598. 
  11. ^ Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for the Year 1866. Southern Methodist Publishing. 1870. p. 340. 
  12. ^ Rowland, Dunbar (1907). Mississippi: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. 2. Southern Historical Publishing Association. p. 225. 
  13. ^ Jordan, Winthrop D. (1995). Tumult and Silence at Second Creek: An Inquiry into a Civil War Slave Conspiracy. Louisiana State University Press. p. 312. 
  14. ^ Wayne, Michael (1999). The Reshaping of Plantation Society: The Natchez District, 1860-80. University of Illinois Press. p. 99.