Pine Valley, New Jersey

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Pine Valley, New Jersey
Borough of Pine Valley
Sign for the Pine Valley Golf Club located in the former borough
Sign for the Pine Valley Golf Club located in the former borough
Pine Valley highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pine Valley highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pine Valley, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pine Valley, New Jersey
Pine Valley is located in Camden County, New Jersey
Pine Valley
Pine Valley
Location in Camden County
Pine Valley is located in New Jersey
Pine Valley
Pine Valley
Location in New Jersey
Pine Valley is located in the United States
Pine Valley
Pine Valley
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°47′18″N 74°58′30″W / 39.788284°N 74.974882°W / 39.788284; -74.974882Coordinates: 39°47′18″N 74°58′30″W / 39.788284°N 74.974882°W / 39.788284; -74.974882[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyCamden
IncorporatedApril 23, 1929
DisestablishedJanuary 1, 2022
Government
 • TypeWalsh Act
 • BodyBoard of Commissioners
 • MayorMichael B. Kennedy (term ended January 1, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorRobert W. Mather[3]
 • Municipal clerkDawn T. Amadio[3]
Area
 • Total0.97 sq mi (2.51 km2)
 • Land0.96 sq mi (2.47 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.04 km2)  1.55%
 • Rank505th of 565 in state
28th of 37 in county[1]
Elevation157 ft (48 m)
Population
 • Total12
 • Estimate 
(2019)[10]
11
 • Rank565th of 566 in state
36th of 37 in county[11]
 • Density12.2/sq mi (4.7/km2)
  • Rank564th of 566 in state
37th of 37 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08021[12]
Area code(s)856[13]
FIPS code3400758920[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID0885353[1][16]

Pine Valley was a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 12,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 8 (-40.0%) from the 20 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1 (+5.3%) from the 19 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] As of the 2010 Census Pine Valley was the second-smallest municipality by population in New Jersey, with just seven more residents than the five residing in Tavistock, also in Camden County.[11]

Pine Valley encompassed Pine Valley Golf Club, which regularly ranks highly on Golf Digest's list of America's 100 greatest courses.

The Borough of Pine Valley was created on April 23, 1929, from Clementon Township, one of seven municipalities created from the now-defunct township, and one of five new municipalities (including Hi-Nella Borough, Lindenwold Borough, Pine Hill Borough and Somerdale Borough) created on that same date.[18]

In 2021, the Borough finalized plans to merge with the adjacent Borough of Pine Hill, dissolving the Pine Valley borough government completely by the end of 2021. Pine Hill gained $20 million in taxable property and the famed golf club.[19] The merger was completed January 1, 2022.[20]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.97 square miles (2.51 km2), including 0.96 square miles (2.47 km2) of land and 0.02 square miles (0.04 km2) of water (1.55%).[1][2]

The borough bordered the Camden County municipalities of Clementon Borough and Pine Hill.[21][22][23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
193040
194027−32.5%
19503944.4%
196020−48.7%
19702315.0%
1980230.0%
199019−17.4%
2000205.3%
201012−40.0%
2019 (est.)11[10][24]−8.3%
Population sources:
1930-2000[25] 1930[26] 1930-1990[27]
2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 12 people, 4 households, and 4 families in the borough. The population density was 12.2 per square mile (4.7/km2). There were 22 housing units at an average density of 22.4 per square mile (8.6/km2). The racial makeup was 83.33% (10) White, 0.00% (0) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.00% (0) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 16.67% (2) from other races, and 0.00% (0) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.67% (2) of the population.[7]

Of the 4 households, 50.0% had children under the age of 18; 75.0% were married couples living together; 0.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 0.0% were non-families. Of all households, 0.0% were made up of individuals and 0.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.00.[7]

16.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 16.7% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 33.3% from 45 to 64, and 0.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.5 years. For every 100 females, the population had 300.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 233.3 males.[7]

As of the 2010 Census, the borough had the second smallest population in the state, ahead of only Tavistock, which had a population of five.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 20 people, 8 households, and 7 families residing in the borough. The population density was 21.0 people per square mile (8.1/km2). There were 21 housing units at an average density of 22.1 per square mile (8.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 100.00% White.[28][29]

As of the 2000 Census, the borough was one of four municipalities with fewer than 50 residents among the 566 in the state, and its population of 20 was behind only Teterboro, where census officials counted 18 residents.[31]

There were eight households, out of which 25.0% had children under the age of eighteen living with them, 87.5% were married couples living together, and 12.5% were non-families. 12.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.71.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 25.0% under the age of 18, 20.0% from 25 to 44, 15.0% from 45 to 64, and 40.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 58 years. For every 100 females, there were 150.0 males. For every 100 women age 18 and over, there were 114.3 men.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $31,875, and the median income for a family was $65,625. Men had a median income of $36,250 versus $52,500 for women. The per capita income for the borough was $23,981. None of the population and none of the families were below the poverty line.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Pine Valley operated under the Walsh Act form of New Jersey municipal government. The borough was one of 30 municipalities (of the then-565) statewide that use the commission form of government.[32] The governing body was comprised of three commissioners, who are elected at-large on a non-partisan basis to four-year terms of office in elections held as part of the May municipal elections. Each commissioner was assigned a specific department to head in addition to their legislative functions and one of the three commissioners was chosen to serve as mayor.[5] Pine Valley has been governed under the Walsh Act, by a three-member commission, since 1942.[33][34]

At the time of the borough's dissolution in 2022, the members of the Pine Valley Board of Commissioners were Mayor Michael B. Kennedy, Kendra L. Clark and Debra M. Kennedy all serving terms of office ending May 17, 2022.[35] The three commissioners had ran unopposed in the 2018 May municipal election.[36][37]

The three incumbents—Jane Bromley and husband-and-wife Michael B. Kennedy and Deborah Kennedy—were re-elected in May 2014 to four-year terms of office in an election held entirely by mail to minimize the costs associated with establishing a polling place for the borough's 14 voters.[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pine Valley was located in the 1st Congressional District[39] and was part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[8][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Pine Valley had been in the 6th state legislative district.[42]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[43][44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[45] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[46][47]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 8th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Jean Stanfield (R, Westampton) and in the General Assembly by Michael Torrissi (R, Hammonton) and Brandon Umba (R, Medford).[48]

Camden County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections for three-year terms on a staggered basis by the residents of the county, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At a reorganization meeting held in January after each election, the newly constituted Board of Commissioners selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[49] As of 2022, Camden County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Louis Cappelli Jr. (D, Collingswood, term as Commissioner ends December 31, 2023; term as Director ends 2022),[50] Commissioner Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (D, Pennsauken Township, term as Commissioner and as Deputy Director ends 2022),[51] Almar Dyer (D, Pennsauken Township, 2024),[52] Melinda Kane (D, Cherry Hill, 2024),[53] Jeffrey L. Nash (D, Winslow Township, 2024),[54] Carmen G. Rodriguez (D, Merchantville, 2022)[55] and Jonathan L. Young Sr. (D, Berlin Township, 2023)[56][49][57][58][59]

Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County Clerk Joseph Ripa (D, Voorhees Township, 2024),[60][61] Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (D, Camden, 2024)[62][63] and Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer (D, Gloucester Township, 2025).[64][65][66] The County Prosecutor is Grace C. MacAulay, who was sworn in on January 6, 2022.[67]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of fifteen registered voters in Pine Valley, of which three (20.0%) were registered as Democrats, ten (66.7%) as Republicans and two (13.3%) as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[68]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 100.0% of the vote (nine cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono and other candidates who received no votes, among the nine ballots cast by the borough's thirteen registered voters, for a turnout of 69.2%.[69][70] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 72.7% of the vote (8 ballots cast), ahead of both Independent Chris Daggett with 18.2% (two votes) and Democrat Jon Corzine with no votes, with eleven ballots cast among the borough's fourteen registered voters, yielding a 78.6% turnout.[71]

Education[edit]

Pine Valley had a non-operating school district.[72] Public school students from Pine Valley attend the Haddonfield Public Schools for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade as part of a sending/receiving relationship, together with students from Haddonfield and Tavistock.[5] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of five schools, had an enrollment of 2,749 students and 215.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.8:1.[73] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[74]) are Central Elementary School[75] with 419 students in grades K-5, Elizabeth Haddon Elementary School[76] with 367 students in grades K-5, J. Fithian Tatem Elementary School[77] with 422 students in grades PreK-5, Haddonfield Middle School[78] with 659 students in grades 6-8 and Haddonfield Memorial High School[79] with 869 students in grades 9-12.[80][81]

Transportation[edit]

Entrance to Pine Valley

All roads in Pine Valley are privately maintained by the golf course. There is only one public entrance, via Atlantic Avenue from neighboring Pine Hill.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Administration, Borough of Pine Valley. Accessed September 22, 2019.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 42.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Pine Valley, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pine Valley borough, Camden County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Pine Valley borough Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  10. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pine Valley, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Pine Valley, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 20, 2014.
  14. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 109. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  19. ^ Riordan, Kevin. "Humble Pine Hill gets ready to welcome the posh Pine Valley Golf Club as two N.J. boroughs become one", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 3, 2021. Accessed November 16, 2021. "Kennedy said that Pine Valley had sought the consolidation after a nonbinding 2020 referendum voters there approved, 10-0, because it 'has been experiencing some budgetary challenges.' Becoming part of Pine Hill will provide his constituents with “a sustainable municipal government,” said the Pine Valley mayor.... So far, Pine Hill seems to be taking in stride the prospect of gaining a few well-heeled residents, a $20 million tax ratable, and bragging rights to one of the finest golf courses anywhere."
  20. ^ "NJ about to subtract one of its tiniest towns in rare merger"
  21. ^ Areas touching Pine Valley, MapIt. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  22. ^ Municipalities within Camden County, NJ, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  23. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  24. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  27. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990 Archived March 19, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Pine Valley borough, New Jersey[permanent dead link], United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Pine Valley borough, Camden County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  30. ^ Staff. "N.J.'s population shifting to coast, south", USA Today. Accessed August 18, 2013.
  31. ^ Strauss, Robert. "Communities; Municipal Madness or 'Creative Localism?'", The New York Times, January 4, 2004. Accessed August 18, 2013. "But for the 20 residents of Pine Valley, the borough that surrounds the golf course, the cute A-frame building is police headquarters, next door to Steiniger Hall, the borough office building, where you can often find Robert Mathers, the clerk of Pine Valley, one of New Jersey's least-populous towns.... Four of them have fewer than 50 souls: Walpack (41) in Sussex County, Teterboro (18) in Bergen County and Pine Valley and Tavistock (24) in Camden County."
  32. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  33. ^ "The Commission Form of Municipal Government" Archived 2015-06-05 at the Wayback Machine, p. 53. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  34. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 8. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  35. ^ 2019 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Borough of Pine Valley. Accessed September 22, 2019.
  36. ^ Wildstein, David. "Incumbents run unopposed in tiny Pine Valley and Teterboro Teterboro mayor beats his son by 1 vote", New Jersey Globe, May 9, 2018. Accessed March 3, 2020. "Pine Valley in Camden County had a population of 10 after the 2010 census, but NJ.com reported that there are 15 voters. Incumbents Michael Kennedy and Debra Kennedy each won 12 votes. Newcomer Kendra Clark, who ran for a Commissioner seat vacated by Jane Bromley, received 13 votes."
  37. ^ Meeting Minutes for June 19, 2018, Borough of Pine Valley. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  38. ^ Comengo, Carol. "Medford Lakes, Pine Valley holding elections Tuesday", Courier-Post, May 12, 2014. Accessed October 23, 2014. "In Pine Valley in Camden County, three incumbent commissioners are seeking re-election to four-year terms without opposition — Mayor Michael B. Kennedy; his wife, Deborah Kennedy; and Jane Bromley. Pine Valley, one of the smallest municipalities in the state and best known for its exclusive golf course, does not have a polling place with a voting machine. Instead, voters receive a ballot in the mail and return it to the Camden County Board of Elections to save the expense of running an election for its 14 registered voters."
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
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  45. ^ U.S. Sen. Cory Booker cruises past Republican challenger Rik Mehta in New Jersey, PhillyVoice. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  47. ^ Home, sweet home: Bob Menendez back in Hudson County. nj.com. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  48. ^ Legislative Roster for District 8, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2022.
  49. ^ a b About the Board of Commissioners, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
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  53. ^ Melinda Kane, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022. As of date accessed, incorrect term dates are listed.
  54. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022. "He is resident of Winslow Township." As of date accessed, incorrect term dates are listed.
  55. ^ Carmen G. Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  56. ^ Jonathan L. Young Sr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  57. ^ Official Election Results 2020 General Election November 2, 2021, Camden County, New Jersey, updated November 15, 2021. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  58. ^ Official Election Results 2020 General Election November 3, 2020, Camden County, New Jersey, updated November 20, 2020. Accessed January 1, 2021.
  59. ^ Official Election Results 2019 General Election November 5, 2019, Camden County, New Jersey, as of November 13, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  60. ^ County Clerk Joseph Ripa, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  61. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  62. ^ Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022. As of date accessed, incorrect term dates are listed.
  63. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  64. ^ Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  65. ^ Members List: Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  66. ^ Your Government, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  67. ^ Staff, Office of the Camden County Prosecutor. Accessed March 14, 2022. "Grace C. MacAulay was sworn in as Camden County Prosecutor on January 6, 2022, capping a nearly 30-year legal career dedicated to seeking justice for victims."
  68. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  69. ^ "Governor - Camden County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
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  71. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County Archived October 17, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  72. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2009.
  73. ^ District information for Haddonfield School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  74. ^ School Data for the Haddonfield Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  75. ^ Central Elementary School, Haddonfield Public Schools. Accessed May 20, 2020.
  76. ^ Elizabeth Haddon Elementary School, Haddonfield Public Schools. Accessed May 20, 2020.
  77. ^ J. Fithian Tatem Elementary School, Haddonfield Public Schools. Accessed May 20, 2020.
  78. ^ Haddonfield Middle School, Haddonfield Public Schools. Accessed May 20, 2020.
  79. ^ Haddonfield Memorial High School, Haddonfield Public Schools. Accessed May 20, 2020.
  80. ^ Directions and Contacts, Haddonfield Public Schools. Accessed May 20, 2020.
  81. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Haddonfield Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 27, 2016.

External links[edit]