Pink House (Charleston, South Carolina)

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Pink House

Pink House is a historic house and art gallery at 17 Chalmers Street in Charleston, South Carolina that is one of the oldest buildings in South Carolina and is the second oldest residence in Charleston after the Colonel William Rhett House[1][better source needed].

The house was built between 1694 and 1712 of pinkish Bermuda stone by John Breton in the city's French Quarter. The date of the building has been the subject of dispute. Two local historians fixed the date as 1712,[2] but a construction date as late as 1745 has been suggested.[3]

The tile gambrel roof dates to the eighteenth century. The building was a tavern in the 1750s. James Gordon was the owner of the house by the 1780s. The artist Alice R. Huger Smith used the house as a studio in the early twentieth century. In the 1930s the house was restored by Mr. and Mrs. Victor Morawetz. Currently, the house features an art gallery.[4]

One famous matron from the 17th-century was Madame Mincey, who was a French Huguenot and long time owner.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ List of the oldest buildings in South Carolina
  2. ^ Stockton, Robert (Sep 8, 1975). "Bermuda Stone Transplanted". Charleston News & Courier. pp. B–1. Retrieved November 3, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Pink House Used For Many Purposes". Charleston News & Courier. Sep 4, 1967. Retrieved November 3, 2013. 
  4. ^ The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City's Architecture By Jonathan H. Poston (Univ of South Carolina Press, 1997)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°46′39″N 79°55′44″W / 32.7775°N 79.9289°W / 32.7775; -79.9289