Pinner

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Pinner
High Street, Pinner in 1991.jpg
High Street, with the Queen's Head on the left and the Church of St John the Baptist in the background
Pinner is located in Greater London
Pinner
Pinner
Location within Greater London
Population31,130 2011 Census[1]
OS grid referenceTQ115895
• Charing Cross12.2 miles (19.6 km) SE
London borough
Ceremonial countyGreater London
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townPINNER
Postcode districtHA5
Dialling code020
PoliceMetropolitan
FireLondon
AmbulanceLondon
UK Parliament
London Assembly
List of places
UK
England
London
51°35′36″N 0°23′22″W / 51.5932°N 0.3894°W / 51.5932; -0.3894Coordinates: 51°35′36″N 0°23′22″W / 51.5932°N 0.3894°W / 51.5932; -0.3894

Pinner is a suburb in the borough of Harrow, Greater London, England, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Charing Cross in the historic county of Middlesex, close to the border with Hillingdon. The population was 31,130 in 2011.[2]

Originally a mediaeval hamlet, the St John Baptist church is 14th century and other parts of the historic village include Tudor buildings. The newer High Street is mainly 18th-century buildings, while Bridge Street has a more urban character and many chain stores.

History[edit]

Street sign

Pinner was originally a hamlet, first recorded in 1231 as Pinnora,[3] although the already archaic -ora (meaning 'hill') suggests its origins lie no later than circa 900.[4] The name Pinn is shared with the River Pinn, which runs through the middle of Pinner. Another suggestion of the name is that it means 'hill-slope shaped like a pin'.[5]

The oldest part of the town lies around the fourteenth-century parish church of St. John the Baptist,[6] at the junction of the present day Grange Gardens, The High Street and Church Lane. The earliest surviving private dwelling, East End Farm Cottage, dates from the late fifteenth century.[7]

The village expanded rapidly between 1923 and 1939 when a series of garden estates, including the architecturally significant Pinnerwood estate conservation area – encouraged by the Metropolitan Railway – grew around its historic core.[8] It was largely from this time onwards that the area (including Hatch End, which forms the northeastern part of Pinner) assumed much of its present-day suburban character. The area is now continuous with neighbouring suburban districts including Rayners Lane and Eastcote.

Pinner contains a large number of homes built in the 1930s Art Deco style, the most grand of which is the Grade II listed Elm Park Court at the junction of West End Lane and Elm Park Road.

Pinner has had an annual street fair held in May since 1336, when it was granted by Royal Charter by Edward III;.[9] Pinner is one of few places in the United Kingdom that still holds an annual fair.

Pinner is within the bounds of the historic county of Middlesex; it was located at the western end of the hundred of Gore, before it was in the Hendon Rural District.

Parish church[edit]

Pinner's St John the Baptist parish church was consecrated in 1321, but built on the site of an earlier Christian place of worship. The west tower and south porch date from the 15th century.[10]

Governance[edit]

Harrow Council has been governed by the Labour Party since 2014. Pinner has two wards, Pinner and Pinner South, each represented by three councillors. Pinner is in the Brent and Harrow constituency for the London Assembly which has been represented since 2008 by Navin Shah (Labour). Since the 2010 general election, Pinner has been part of the Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner parliamentary constituency, currently served by David Simmonds.[11]

Geography[edit]

Farmland near Pinner

Pinner includes Pinner Village at its centre, along with the localities of Pinner Green and Pinnerwood Park Conservation Area[12] to the north. To the north east is the larger area of Hatch End, served by Hatch End railway station (originally opened as Pinner).

The River Pinn flows through Pinner, flowing in a diagonal direction. Large parks and open spaces are Pinner Memorial Park, Pinner Village Gardens, Pinner Wood (woodlands) and Pinner Park (farmland).

Much of Pinner has an elevation of about 148 feet (45 m) to 200 feet (60 m). Nower Hill rises to a peak of about 260 feet (80 m) above sea level while Pinner Park peaks at 203 feet (62 m). The semi-rural Pinnerwood area is steep, and rises to a peak of over 390 feet (120 m) around Pinner Hill Golf Course.

Demography[edit]

The lake at Pinner Memorial Park

Pinner is both a religiously and culturally mixed area, with the ethnic minority population having grown significantly since the 1970s.[13] Pinner ward nonetheless had the highest concentration of people describing themselves as white in the London Borough of Harrow, at 72 per cent of the population in 2011. In 2013 the Pinner South ward had the next highest proportion of white people in the borough at 69.4 per cent.[14] Various churches, a synagogue and others serve the religious needs of the community.

Pinner also has the lowest crime rate in the whole of London, with several independent schools and single-sex schools with a prestigious reputation, making it a popular area for affluent families.[15] In the 2014/15 period, the Pinner South ward had a crime rate of 24.5, which was the lowest out of all 628 wards of Greater London.[16] The ward also has (data from 2009 to 2013) the second highest female life expectancy in the capital: 91.7 years, only bettered by Holland ward in Kensington and Chelsea.[16]

Fairs and Fetes[edit]

Crowds at Pinner Fair, 1988

Pinner holds a number of Fairs and Fetes that are renowned in North West London for bringing its diverse and cosmopolitan community together.

  • Pinner Fair has been held annually since 1336, when it was granted by Royal Charter by King Edward III. The fair still draws thousand of people and families from Pinner and the surrounding areas in North West London.[17][18]
  • Pinner Donkey Derby and Fete, held between 1925 and 1939 was a Charity event organised by Rev. John Caulfield, parish priest of St. Luke's, Pinner and Steve Donoghue, a leading flat-race jockey. Huge crowds would turn up to see the Derby, as it was also a chance to see celebrities and sporting personalities of the era.[19][20][21]
  • St. George's Day annual celebrations are organised by the Rotary Club of Pinner and features the "Ye Olde Wheelbarrow Race". A unique event to Pinner, which consists of a team of two taking turns to push their partner around in a wheelbarrow while drinking beer and racing around Pinner.[22]

Sport and leisure[edit]

Pinner has a rugby union team, Pinner and Grammarians RFC, a member club of the Rugby Football Union. It is the most junior team to have supplied a President to the RFU.[23] Pinner also has a cricket team, Pinner Cricket Club,[24] and a youth football club, Pinner United FC.[25] The area also has a golf course, Pinner Golf course.[26]

In addition to numerous restaurants and a number of public houses, Pinner has an amateur theatre group, Pinner Players, who have been performing in the area since 1936 and currently stage productions at Pinner Village Hall[27] off Chapel Lane.[28]

The Heath Robinson Museum in Pinner Memorial Park was opened in 2016 and is dedicated to the work of William Heath Robinson.

In popular culture[edit]

Literature[edit]

Edward Lear makes reference to Pinner[29] in More Nonsense Pictures, Rhymes, Botany, etc:

There was an old person of Pinner,
As thin as a lath, if not thinner;
They dressed him in white,
And roll'd him up tight,
That elastic old person of Pinner.

H. G. Wells mentions Pinner in War of the Worlds:

He learned they were the wife and the younger sister of a surgeon living at Stanmore, who had come in the small hours from a dangerous case at Pinner, and heard at some railway station on his way of the Martian advance.

Broadcast media[edit]

  • The Pinner fair held in Pinner High Street features in Sir John Betjeman's 1973 BBC film, Metro-Land.[30]
  • The BBC sitcom May to December (1989–1994) was set in Pinner, and its exterior shots were recorded in the High Street.[31][32]
  • During the 1990s the children's TV series Aquila was filmed in and around Pinner, particularly at the local Cannon Lane School.
  • Chucklevision, the Children's TV series based on the Chuckle Brothers was also filmed in Pinner.
  • Between 2000 and 2006 Pinner was used for location footage for BBC sitcom My Hero, starting Ardal O'Hanlon as Thermoman.[33]
  • Channel 4's coming-of-age television teen sitcom The Inbetweeners, Season 1 (2008), Episode 2 "Bunk Off" was filmed on the High Street in Pinner.[34]
  • The 2009 film Nowhere Boy had a number of scenes filmed in Pinner, including outside the Queens Head Pub, Pinner High Street,[35] and on Woodhall Gate, which stood in for John Lennon's childhood home.[36]
  • The 2012 film May I Kill U?, written and directed by Stuart Urban and starring Kevin Bishop, was also filmed in Pinner.[37]
  • Filming for the 2014 movie The Theory of Everything took place outside the St John the Baptist Church on Pinner High Street.[38]
  • Documentary series, Great British Railway Journeys, Series 6 (2015), Episode 6, "Amersham to Regent's Park" features Michael Portillo in Pinner, were he finds out about a Victorian domestic goddess (Isabella Beeton) and whips up a pint of her fanciest ice cream.[39]
  • BBC Radio 1's, 24 Years at the Tap End (2011–) is Chris Stark's memoir of growing up in and around Pinner during the turn of the millennium.[40]
  • BBC Radio 5 Live's Hit Podcast, That Peter Crouch Podcast (2018–) has many reference to Pinner, Hatch End and the surrounding areas.[41]
  • Rocketman (2019), the biographical musical film based on the life and music of British musician Elton John, had a number of scenes filmed in and around Pinner. Oakmeade step in for Pinner Hill Road as Elton John's childhood home[42] and Albury Drive as his father's home.
  • British dark comedy-drama spy thriller television series Killing Eve, Season 3 (2020), Episode 5, is titled "Are you from Pinner?". This is in reference to the character Bor'ka's fondness of Elton John.[43][44]

Notable people[edit]

Sir Elton John was born and grew up in Pinner

Transport[edit]

George V Avenue dual carriageway, which cuts through Pinner Park

Rail[edit]

Pinner Underground station was opened in 1885 and is on the Metropolitan line in London fare zone 5. In normal off-peak conditions the train takes approximately half an hour to Baker Street Underground station and approximately three-quarters of an hour to Aldgate Underground station.

Hatch End railway station was opened in 1842 and is on the London Overground Watford DC line in London fare zone 6. In normal off-peak conditions it roughly takes three-quarters of an hour to Euston railway station.

Buses[edit]

Route Start End Operator
183 Pinner, Bridge Street Golders Green Bus Station London Sovereign
H11 Harrow Bus Station Northwood, Mount Vernon Hospital, London Sovereign
H12 South Harrow Bus Station Stanmore Station London Sovereign
H13 Ruislip Lido Northwood Hills, St Vincent's Park Metroline
398[62] Ruislip Station Greenford, Hemery Road London United Busways

Public Transport in Pinner is governed by Transport for London.

Heritage[edit]

Harrow Heritage Plaques[edit]

The brown plaques are awarded by the Harrow Heritage Trust,[63] who secure the protection, preservation, restoration and improvement of the character and amenities of the London Borough of Harrow.

  • Queen's Head Public House on the High Street.[64]
  • Wax Well on Waxwell Lane.[64]
  • Elthorne Gate on the High Street.[64]
  • Grim's Dyke on Montesole Playing Fields.[64]
  • Pinner House on Church Lane.[64]
  • Pinner Hill Farm on Pinner Hill Road.[64]

English Heritage Plaques[edit]

London's blue plaques scheme, run by English Heritage,[65] celebrates the links between notable figures of the past and the buildings in which they lived and worked.

  • Sir Ambrose Heal (1872–1959), "Furniture Designer and Retailer lived here 1901–1917", The Fives Court, Moss Lane[66]
  • W. Heath Robinson (1872–1944), "Illustrator and comic artist lived here 1913–1918", 75 Moss Lane[67]

Architecture[edit]

The architecture in Pinner has evolved greatly over the centuries. The majority of the architecture is conserved by private residents or by Harrow council's Conservation Team.[68]

Norman, Gothic and Tudor architecture (1066–1603)

High Street

Georgian architecture (1714–1811)

Estate agent at the corner of High Street
Pinner Police Station, Waxwell Lane

Victorian architecture (1837–1901)

Tooke's Folly at Pinner Hill Farm, c. 1862

Metro-land architecture (1903–1939)

  • Suburban prototypes on Cecil Park Estate[105][106][107]
  • Tudor revival dwellings on Grange Estate[106][107]
  • Arts and Crafts dwellings on Pinnerwood Park Estate[70]
  • Cottages on Elm Park Road[108]

Art Deco architecture (1919–1939)

  • Elm Park Court on Elm Park Road[70][109]
  • Pinner Court on Pinner Road[70][110]
  • Harrow Fire Station on Pinner Road[70]
  • Pinner Wood School on Latimer Gardens[70][111]

Modern architecture (1945–1980)

  • Roman Catholic Church of St Luke on Love Lane[112]
  • Shops on Bishops Walk
  • Shops on Barters Walk
  • Dwellings on Nursery Road

Postmodern architecture (1980–present)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pinner is made up of 3 wards in the London Borough of Harrow: Hatch End, Pinner, and Pinner South. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ a b Clarke, A History of Pinner, p.11
  4. ^ Clarke, A History of Pinner, p.1
  5. ^ http://kepn.nottingham.ac.uk/map/place/Middlesex/Pinner[bare URL]
  6. ^ Clarke, A History of Pinner, p.34. The church was originally a chapel of ease to St Mary's Church in Harrow, and was first mentioned in 1234. It was rebuilt in the early fourteenth-century, and rededicated in 1321. The parish became independent of St Mary's in 1766, when the first perpetual curate was appointed; not until the Wilberforce Act of 1868 did it appoint its first vicar, one William Hind.
  7. ^ Clarke, A History of Pinner, p.18
  8. ^ Clarke, A History of Pinner, pp.176–184
  9. ^ Clarke, A History of Pinner, p.25
  10. ^ Weinreb, Ben and Hibbert, Christopher (1992). The London Encyclopaedia (reprint ed.). Macmillan. p. 745.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  11. ^ www.statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved 14 August 2008.
  12. ^ "Harrow – Pinnerwood Park Estate Conservation Area Appraisal 29 October 2008" (PDF). Harrow Council. Retrieved 19 December 2019.
  13. ^ Muir, Hugh (8 July 2016). "Black flight: how England's suburbs are changing colour". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 December 2016.
  14. ^ "A look at Harrow's wards: 2011 Census second release". Harrow Council. February 2013. Retrieved 5 December 2016.
  15. ^ "Pinner Guide". AllInLondon.co.uk. Retrieved 14 March 2012.
  16. ^ a b https://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/ward-profiles-and-atlas[bare URL]
  17. ^ "Thousands enjoy Pinner fair". Harrow Times. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  18. ^ Pathé, British. "Annual Fair At Pinner". www.britishpathe.com. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  19. ^ "Obituary – from the Catholic Herald Archive". archive-uat.catholicherald.co.uk. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  20. ^ Pathé, British. "Donkey Derby And Fete At Pinner". www.britishpathe.com. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  21. ^ Pathé, British. "The Donkey Derby". www.britishpathe.com. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  22. ^ "Pinner St George's Day celebration". Pinner. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  23. ^ "Rugby Football History". www.rugbyfootballhistory.com.
  24. ^ "Pinner Cricket Club home page". pinnercc.hitssports.com.
  25. ^ "Pinner United FC". pinner-utd-fc.
  26. ^ "PINNER HILL GOLF CLUB LTD". www.pinnerhillgc.co.uk.
  27. ^ "Pinner Village Hall: Available to hire for all occasions". www.pinnervillagehall.org.uk.
  28. ^ "Pinner Players Theatre Company". Pinner Players Theatre Company.
  29. ^ Lear, Edward (1872). More Nonsense Pictures, Rhymes, Botany, etc. London: R J Bush.
  30. ^ The Best of Betjeman (2000 ed.). Penguin Books. 2000. p. 228.
  31. ^ Campbell, Mark (28 August 1999). "Torquay: the horrible truth". The Independent. Retrieved 16 March 2011.
  32. ^ May to December (Comedy), Anton Rodgers, Frances White, Paul Venables, Rebecca Lacey, British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), Cinema Verity, 2 April 1989, retrieved 21 October 2020CS1 maint: others (link)
  33. ^ My Hero (Comedy, Fantasy, Romance), Emily Joyce, Geraldine McNulty, Hugh Dennis, Lill Roughley, Big Bear Films, 4 February 2000, retrieved 21 October 2020CS1 maint: others (link)
  34. ^ Anderson, Gordon (1 May 2008), Bunk Off (Comedy), Simon Bird, James Buckley, Blake Harrison, Joe Thomas, Kapital Entertainment, retrieved 21 October 2020
  35. ^ "December 2009 – Pinner High Street". Film London. Retrieved 16 March 2011.
  36. ^ Nowhere Boy (2009) – IMDb, retrieved 21 October 2020
  37. ^ addictedtoeddieblogspot. "October 2013". addictedtoeddieblogspot. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  38. ^ The Theory of Everything (2014) – IMDb, retrieved 21 October 2020
  39. ^ "Great British Railway Journeys". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  40. ^ "Scott Mills – 24 Years at the Tap End – Season 2". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  41. ^ "That Peter Crouch Podcast". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  42. ^ "Rocketman Filming Locations: Pinner and Beyond". findthatlocation.com. Retrieved 8 May 2021.
  43. ^ Harrington, Delia (10 May 2020). "Killing Eve Season 3 Episode 5 Review: Are You From Pinner?". Den of Geek. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  44. ^ Murphy, Shannon (10 May 2020), Are You from Pinner? (Action, Adventure, Drama, Thriller), Jodie Comer, Temirlan Blaev, Natallia Bulynia, Dimitrij Schaad, retrieved 21 October 2020
  45. ^ Pinner Local History. Retrieved 12 August 2008
  46. ^ a b Clarke, A History of Pinner, p.155
  47. ^ Pinner Local History Society. Retrieved 13 August 2008.
  48. ^ Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 12 August 2008.
  49. ^ Obituary of Jo Durden-Smith, The Independent, 5 June 2007. Retrieved 14 August 2008.
  50. ^ The Lord Finkelstein, OBE, Debrett's. Retrieved 14 November 2013.
  51. ^ Views of W. S. Gilbert Archived 25 October 2006 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 12 August 2008.
  52. ^ BBC Kent: Profile of Bob Holness. Retrieved 13 August 2008.
  53. ^ Elton John official website Archived 15 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 12 August 2008.
  54. ^ "You could live in the house where Sir Elton John was born". Evening Standard. 12 June 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  55. ^ 'No word on fate of Iraq peace hostages', The Independent, 12 December 2005. Retrieved 14 August 2005.
  56. ^ Bradberry, Grace (23 January 2004). "The original sinner". The Evening Standard. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  57. ^ www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 13 August 2008.
  58. ^ Clarke, A History of Pinner, p. 192
  59. ^ ":: Michael Rosen – The Website ::".
  60. ^ www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 13 August 2008.
  61. ^ The Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 7 August 2008.
  62. ^ Route 398 serves stops in Pinner near its southern border, but not the town centre itself.
  63. ^ https://www.harrowheritagetrust.org.uk/[bare URL]
  64. ^ a b c d e f https://www.harrowheritagetrust.org.uk/plaques.php[bare URL]
  65. ^ "Blue Plaques". English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  66. ^ "Ambrose Heal | Furniture Designer | Blue Plaques". English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  67. ^ "W. Heath Robinson | Illustrator | Blue Plaques". English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  68. ^ gangari, tariq. "Conservation". Harrow Council. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  69. ^ "CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST, Harrow – 1286312 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  70. ^ a b c d e f g gangari, tariq. "Conservation". Harrow Council. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  71. ^ "THE VICTORY PUBLIC HOUSE, Non Civil Parish – 1286035 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  72. ^ "7, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1358633 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  73. ^ "9, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1193639 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  74. ^ "11, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1079698 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  75. ^ "25–27, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1193645 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  76. ^ "26, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1286041 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  77. ^ "29, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1079699 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  78. ^ "33–35, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1286059 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  79. ^ "34, 34A, 36, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1358634 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  80. ^ "BARN TO SOUTH OF NUMBER 38, Harrow – 1079705 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  81. ^ "58, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1193713 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  82. ^ "BEE COTTAGE, Harrow – 1079660 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  83. ^ "WAXWELL FARMHOUSE, Harrow – 1079661 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  84. ^ "MANOR COTTAGE MANOR HOUSE WAXWELL COTTAGE, Harrow – 1079659 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  85. ^ "TUDOR COTTAGE, Harrow – 1079672 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  86. ^ "EAST END FARM COTTAGE, Harrow – 1358620 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  87. ^ "EAST END HOUSE, Harrow – 1358657 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  88. ^ "EAST BARN TO EAST END FARM (PREMISES TO MCPHAIL BROS), Harrow – 1193851 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  89. ^ "PINNER HOUSE, Harrow – 1358615 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  90. ^ "18–24, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1079703 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  91. ^ "The Queen's Head, Non Civil Parish – 1079700 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  92. ^ "32, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1079704 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  93. ^ "37, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1079701 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  94. ^ "The Hand in Hand Public House, Harrow – 1193708 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  95. ^ "39, HIGH STREET, Harrow – 1079702 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  96. ^ "HAYWOOD HOUSE, Harrow – 1079706 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  97. ^ "PINNER PARK FARMHOUSE, Harrow – 1079715 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  98. ^ "Former Granary at Headstone Manor, Non Civil Parish – 1420464 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  99. ^ "Pinner Police Station including stable block, boundary wall, gate pier and fences, bollards and police lamps, Non Civil Parish – 1411163 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  100. ^ "TOOKE'S FOLLY AT PINNER HILL FARM, Harrow – 1079682 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  101. ^ "BARNS ON SOUTH AND WEST SIDES OF YARD AT PINNER HILL FARM, Harrow – 1194027 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  102. ^ "PINNER HILL FARMHOUSE AND BRICK BARN TO REAR, Harrow – 1079681 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  103. ^ "A Brief History of Pinner Hill (researched and written by Ellie Pithers)". www.pinnerhill.org. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  104. ^ "PINNER HILL GOLF CLUB HOUSE, AND BOUNDARY WALL EXTENDING NORTHWARDS FROM CLUB HOUSE, Harrow – 1358625 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  105. ^ "Metroland: the golden age of mock Tudor | MIDDLESEX: A ROUNDTRIP IN NOWHERE LAND". Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  106. ^ a b Green, Oliver. (1987). The London Underground : an illustrated history. London Transport Museum. London: Ian Allan in association with the London Transport Museum. ISBN 0-7110-1720-4. OCLC 59997780.
  107. ^ a b Jackson, Alan Arthur. (1986). London's metropolitan railway. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-8839-8. OCLC 16277029.
  108. ^ "TUDOR COTTAGE, Harrow – 1253922 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  109. ^ "ELM PARK COURT, AND ENTRANCE ARCH, Harrow – 1261409 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  110. ^ "PINNER COURT, Harrow – 1254195 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  111. ^ "Our History". PWS. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  112. ^ "Roman Catholic Church of St Luke, Non Civil Parish – 1429922 | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  113. ^ "Heath Robinson Museum". www.heathrobinsonmuseum.org. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  114. ^ "Final phase of five year regeneration begins". Catalyst housing association London and South East. 30 October 2014. Retrieved 27 October 2020.

References[edit]

External links[edit]