Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (video game)

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Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
Pirates of the Caribbean At World's End (Video Game Cover).jpg
Cover art
Developer(s)Eurocom
Publisher(s)Disney Interactive Studios
Platform(s)Wii, Nintendo DS, Xbox 360, PlayStation Portable, PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Microsoft Windows
Release
  • NA: May 22, 2007
  • EU: May 22, 2007 (Wii)
  • AU: May 24, 2007
  • EU: May 25, 2007
  • EU: December 10, 2007 (PC)
Genre(s)Action-adventure, hack and slash
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is a video game based on the Pirates of the Caribbean films Dead Man's Chest and At World's End, published by Buena Vista Games for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Microsoft Windows, PSP, Nintendo DS and the Wii.[1]

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End follows the events of Pirates of the Caribbean movies Dead Man's Chest and At World's End with some additional missions and characters. In game location include locales such as the Black Pearl, the Flying Dutchman, Tortuga, Davy Jones Locker, Shipwreck Cove, Port Royal and a prison. As Captain Jack Sparrow the player visits several locations to find the pirate lords and tell them of the meeting at Shipwreck Cove requiring the player to battle the pirate lords and their guards or perform favors for them.

Near the end of the game the player must battle across the Flying Dutchman as both Will and Jack for the Dead Man's Chest. The battle ends with Will killing Davy Jones and remaining behind as Jack returns to the Black Pearl. On the Pearl, the player has to defend the ship against the Endeavour and Lord Cutler Beckett until the Dutchman returns under Will's command and destroys the Endeavour, killing Beckett. After the battle Barbossa has another mutiny against Jack. Jack later runs into Black Bart along with Scarlett and Giselle.[2]

Plot[edit]

The entire game is based on the search for the Pirate Lords for the Pirate Conclave meeting at the Shipwreck City. The reason for this research is to try to find a remedy for the pirate extermination conducted by the perfidious Davy Jones. At the meeting it will be necessary to counter this extermination that could lead to the definitive disappearance of piracy, and to do this the Pirate King will be elected, who will decide what to do.

That wreck of the Black Pearl still floats, I see. Let's ship it to the depths to which it belongs.

— Lord Cutler Beckett before the final battle

Captain Jack Sparrow has been imprisoned in the Fortress Prison and is found by his father: Captain Tegue Sparrow, who gives him a sword and helps him escape. The Pirate tells Jack he has to go to Port Royal to look for Tia Dalma: a voodoo priestess who knows the secret to defeating Davy Jones. After freeing some prisoners and escaping from the fortress, Tegue kicks his son pushing him into a canoe, with which Jack sails for a while, until he comes across the Black Pearl.  Immediately notice that all crew members are hidden and "Sputafuoco" Bill Turner (William Turner's father) warns him of the threat of Jones looming over him and that he must take refuge on dry land.

Not having time to get to Port Royal, Jack runs into an island inhabited by a primitive population: the Pelagostos. Superstitious and violent, the people mistake Jack for a divinity because of his clothes and they want to give him in sacrifice to make him return to heaven.  William Turner (Will) is sailing the waters on a canoe and exploring, he meets Jack, also realizing that the Pelagostos are rather hostile and attack him. Freeing some members of the Black Pearl crew, Jack and Will manage to escape on a semi-destroyed and improvised raft and rejoin the ship commanded by the master quarter Johamee Gibbs and head to Port Royal.

Here they can find Tia Dalma, who reveals that Davy Jones can only be killed if his heart is stabbed and that whoever owns it controls Jones. Furthermore, he says they must find all the Nine Noble Pirates, scattered around the Caribbean Sea. Jack starts freeing Captain Chevalle the French, who is about to be stoned.  Fleeing, Jack meets Governor Swann, who tells him that his daughter was convicted of piracy by Lord Culter Beckett and that she rushed to Tortuga to look for Will Turner. Joined with his crew, Jack and Will embark towards Tortuga, but are tracked down by the Flying Dutchman.  Will heads in there secretly and manages to get the key to Davy Jones's chest and talk to his father, promising that he would come back for it.  Back on the Black Pearl, Jones threatens Jack with a slow and excruciating death and that the Seven Seas are not large enough to hide.

In Tortuga, Jack finds and duels with Eduardo Villanova: Lord of the Pirates in the company of his wife: Mrs. Ching. Succeeding in recruiting them, he saves Elisabeth Swann and James Norringhton - drunk - from a fight in a tavern and escapes from local pirates.

They sail to Isla Cruces, where they find the chest of Davy Jones, which however is stolen by Norringhton, who delivers it to Beckett: now he and the British Navy are in control of Davy Jones, who tracks down the Black Pearl and tries to board it, but the wind explains the sails from the opposite direction. Frustrated, Jones conjures up the Kraken: a giant octopus-like sea monster. The Kraken attacks the Black Pearl, but thanks to Jack's sacrifice, the crew manages to escape and the Kraken, on the verge of death, eats the entire vessel with Jack on board.

Below deck, Tia Dalma reveals that she has resurrected the deceased Hector Barbossa, so that he could help them find Jack and to do so, they set off for Singapore, to agree with Sao Feng: Pirate Lord of Southeast Asia. This, however, declines and wants to see Jack Sparrow dead. For this, Will makes a pact with him: if Sao Feng had offered him a map and a ship to reach the inside of Davy Jones's chest (ie the Kraken's stomach), they would have brought him Jack Sparrow alive. Meanwhile, Barbossa fights against the wives of Sao Feng and Singapore is invaded by British soldiers, who manage to blow up the pier.

Embarked, with L'Imperatrice (the ship of Sao Feng) for the World Borders, Barbossa finds Jack still alive and the Black Pearl is transported back to the sea by some Sand Spiders. Meanwhile, Jack heads to Hell to save Captain Jokar the Gentleman, trapped in a bone cage.

Arriving at the Shipwreck City (Bay of Wrecks), Jack meets his father, who tells him that some of Beckett's men have entered the city and that the Pirate Conclave must begin soon. Jack brings Captain Hammand the Corsair and the captain Sevijh Savajih the Indian in the Hall of the Conclave. Barbossa reached the town in time and joined the Conclave, where everyone showed the Pezzida Otto and voted for themselves, being joined by Elizabeth, who was proclaimed Lord of the Pirates by Sao Feng at his death in the Empress, following the  boarding of the Flying Dutchman and which was captured by Jones and freed by the late Norringhton.

Jack votes for Elizabeth, making her become the Pirate King. Elizabeth decides to attack Davy Jones's ship, while Tia Dalma turns into the goddess Calypso, causing the Maelstrom. Jack and Will get on the Flying Dutchman and Davy stabs Will who, on his deathbed, in turn pierces Davy Jones's heart, taking control of the Flying Dutchman and returning to life. Meanwhile, the Black Pearl is attacked by Beckett's vessel, which is defeated and its ship becomes a wreck and reaches the Dutch.

Hector Barbossa betrays Jack and gives him a boat to leave. Jack returns to Port Royal and a baron teases him, calling him only Jack Sparrow, while Jack reminds him that his name is: Captain Jack Sparrow.

Characters[edit]

Main[edit]

  • Jack Sparrow: is a pirate son of Edward Tegue Sparrow and is the rightful captain of the Black Pearl.  Despite the plot of the game is not serious about him, he is still the absolute protagonist. He frees all the Pirate Lords, to the point of revealing himself as one of them. Together with Will, he defeats Davy Jones in the final duel and Lord Culter Beckett. At the end of the game, Barbossa illegally appropriates his ship and grants him a lifeboat to leave. Jack arrives in Port Royal, where he is mocked by a baron.
  • William Turner Junior: son of the pirate Bill Turner, he was a skilled pirate hunter, until he converted to one of them. He falls in love with Elisabeth Swann (Governor Weatherby Swann's daughter). In the game, save Jack Sparrow from the Pelagostos and together they escape. After escaping from Port Royal, he manages to recover the key to Davy Jones's chest and becomes the new captain of the Flying Dutchman, after having stabbed the heart of Jones.
  • Elisabeth Swann: a woman belonging to the English nobility, she was looking for adventure and then joined the Pirates. In the game she is dressed first as a pirate, then as a Pirate Lady. According to the events of the game, she was named Lady of the Pirates by Sao Feng, upon her death on the Empress (her ship). Later she was captured by Davy Jones and freed by Norringhton. Lead the naval battle between the Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman.
  • Hector Barbossa: Captain who in the past gave Jack a hard time. He was resurrected by Tia Dalma and helps the Black Pearl and the Council of Pirates (to which he belongs) to win the war against Davy Jones. Escort his companions to Singapore, save Jack from Davy Jones's treasure chest and illegally appropriates the Black Pearl, giving Jack a lifeboat to leave.

Secondary[edit]

  • Edward Tegue: pirate and father of Jack Sparrow (absolute protagonist of the game). It can only be seen in the first episode, in which he offers a sword and a plan to Jack to escape from the Fortress Prison, to then kick him by ending him in a canoe - and in the penultimate episode, in which he warns Jack and the Council that some of Beckett's men they entered the Shipwreck City and therefore the Pirate Conclave must begin as soon as possible. Afterwards, no trace of him will be found.
  • Tia Dalma: voodoo priestess and elusive gypsy, appears in the third, in the eighth and in the last episode. He tells Jack that the only way to defeat Davy Jones is to stab his heart. In addition, he brought Barbossa back to life and - at the end of the game - turns into the goddess Calypso, causing the Maelstrom. Sao Feng wives: two women with the sword who share the same husband, the Lord of the Pirates of the Southeast  Asian: Sao Feng. They appear only in the eighth episode and are the boss of Hector Barbossa and the only boss of the episode.
  • "Sputafuoco" Bill Turner: father of Will Turner, is a pirate who in the past signed a pact with Davy Jones, therefore having to stay aboard the 'Flying Dutchman for the rest of his days.  In the game, it appears only at the end of the first episode, in which he warns Jack Sparrow of Davy Jones's imminent arrival - and in the fourth episode, in which he threatens Will Turner with a sword, to then realize that it was his son, who  he promises that he would come back for it. Promise that will never be kept.

Antagonists[edit]

  • Davy Jones: a sea monster that was once human and a co-antagonist of the entire game. He can be killed only if his heart is stabbed. Will Turner manages to get the key that opens the chest that holds his heart. Subsequently, the chest is stolen by Norringhton, who delivers it to the British Navy. Davy Jones is killed by Jack and Will, who stabs his heart. Jones, therefore, dies and is sucked into the Maelstrom. Lord
  • Culter Beckett: co-antagonist of the entire game. He is the Lord of the British Navy and obstructs the crew of the Black Pearl. He puts a bounty on the heads of Jack, Will and Elisabeth and when Norringhton steals the chest containing the heart of Davy Jones, Beckett has full control and makes both ships collide in an epic battle. Eventually, he dies under the cannons of the Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman (commanded by Will) and his ship is destroyed.
  • James Norringhton: secondary antagonist of the game, in the past he was Elisabeth's lover (but his love was not  reciprocated). In the game he makes his appearance in the fifth episode as a drunk pirate, completely away from the image of a British Navy officer. He steals the foziere containing the heart of Davy Jones on Isla Cruces and delivers it to Lord Culter Beckett. She frees Elisabeth after she is imprisoned by Davy Jones in the Dutch and dies in circumstances that are not shown, but are explained by Elisabeth at the end of the penultimate episode.

Lords of the Pirates[edit]

  • Capitan Chevalle the French
  • Captain Edoardo Villanova
  • Mrs Ching
  • Captain Jokar the Gentleman
  • Captain Hammand the Corsair
  • Captain Sevijh Savajih
  • Captain Sao Feng
  • Captain Jack Tegue Sparrow
  • Captain Hector Barbossa

Cast[edit]

While Jack, Will, Elizabeth, Barbossa and Davy Jones were performed by their Disney soundalikes, a number of cast members reprised their roles from the films:

Reception[edit]

Reception
Review scores
PublicationScore
DSPCPS2PS3PSPWiiXbox 360
EdgeN/AN/AN/A3/10[3]N/AN/AN/A
EGMN/AN/AN/A5.17/10[4]N/AN/A5.17/10[4]
EurogamerN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A3/10[5]
Game InformerN/AN/AN/A6/10[6]N/AN/A6/10[6]
GameProN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A3/5 stars[7]
GameSpot7.1/10[8]5.4/10[9]5.4/10[9]6/10[10]5.4/10[9]5/10[12]6.2/10[11]
GameSpy3.5/5 stars[13]N/AN/AN/AN/A1.5/5 stars[15]3/5 stars[14]
GameTrailersN/AN/AN/A6.4/10[16]N/AN/A6.4/10[16]
GameZone6.8/10[17]N/AN/AN/AN/A6.2/10[19]6/10[18]
IGN6.5/10[20]6.5/10[21]6.5/10[21]5.2/10[22]6.5/10[23]6.5/10[21]5.5/10[24]
Nintendo Power7/10[25]N/AN/AN/AN/A4.5/10[25]N/A
OXM (US)N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A5.5/10[26]
PC Gamer (US)N/A40%[27]N/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Aggregate scores
GameRankings65.30%[28]58.86%[29]51.50%[30]56.80%[31]58.25%[32]56.59%[34]58.09%[33]
Metacritic66/100[35]57/100[36]54/100[37]55/100[38]61/100[39]53/100[41]58/100[40]

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End was rated mixed by critics for all the platforms it was released for. From the highest scores to the lowest, GameRankings and Metacritic gave it a score of 65.30% and 66 out of 100 for the DS version;[28][35] 58.86% and 57 out of 100 for the PC version;[29][36] 58.25% and 61 out of 100 for the PSP version;[32][39] 58.09% and 58 out of 100 for the Xbox 360 version;[33][40] 56.80% and 55 out of 100 for the PlayStation 3 version;[31][38] 56.59% and 53 out of 100 for the Wii version;[34][41] and 51.50% and 54 out of 100 for the PlayStation 2 version.[30][37]

IGN gave the mobile phone version a score of 6.5 out of 10 and stated: "Developer Capybara Games has assembled a perfunctory movie-game that hits its marks -- swashbuckling, cannon fire, vine swinging -- but fails to engage the player at all. That the game play isn't compelling (a problem augmented by iffy control) is a shame, because with no fewer than 21 levels, this could have been a real value for mobile gamers."[42]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://bvgames.disney.go.com/disney/news/pirates3_19March2007.html Archived 2011-07-11 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ http://guides.ign.com/guides/742505/
  3. ^ Edge staff (July 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (PS3)". Edge (177): 91.
  4. ^ a b EGM staff (July 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (X360, PS3)". Electronic Gaming Monthly (217): 86.
  5. ^ Reed, Kristan (May 23, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (X360)". Eurogamer. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  6. ^ a b Reiner, Andrew (July 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (X360, PS3)". Game Informer (171). Archived from the original on January 24, 2008. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  7. ^ Keep'em Gessin' (May 22, 2007). "Review: Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (X360)". GamePro. Archived from the original on October 1, 2007. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  8. ^ Provo, Frank (May 31, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (DS)". GameSpot. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  9. ^ a b c Thomas, Aaron (May 25, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review". GameSpot. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  10. ^ Thomas, Aaron (May 24, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (PS3)". GameSpot. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  11. ^ Thomas, Aaron (May 23, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (X360)". GameSpot. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  12. ^ Thomas, Aaron (May 25, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (Wii)". GameSpot. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  13. ^ Theobald, Phil (May 24, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (DS)". GameSpy. Archived from the original on June 9, 2007. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  14. ^ Theobald, Phil (May 29, 2007). "GameSpy: Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (Xbox 360)". GameSpy. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  15. ^ Theobald, Phil (May 29, 2007). "GameSpy: Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (Wii)". GameSpy. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  16. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (X360, PS3)". GameTrailers. June 1, 2007. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  17. ^ Platt, Dylan (June 3, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End - NDS - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on December 4, 2008. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  18. ^ Knutson, Michael (May 24, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End - 360 - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on December 9, 2008. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  19. ^ Smith, Brock (May 29, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End - WII - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on September 17, 2008. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  20. ^ Harris, Craig (May 25, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (NDS)". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  21. ^ a b c Bozon, Mark (May 25, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  22. ^ Miller, Jonathan (May 22, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (PS3)". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  23. ^ Bozon, Mark (June 19, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (PSP)". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  24. ^ Miller, Jonathan (May 22, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (X360)". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  25. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End". Nintendo Power. 217: 94. July 2007.
  26. ^ "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End". Official Xbox Magazine: 81. July 2007.
  27. ^ "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End". PC Gamer: 56. September 2007.
  28. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for DS". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  29. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PC". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  30. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PlayStation 2". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  31. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PlayStation 3". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  32. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PSP". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  33. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for Xbox 360". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  34. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for Wii". GameRankings. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  35. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for DS Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  36. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PC Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  37. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PlayStation 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  38. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PlayStation 3 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  39. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for PSP Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  40. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for Xbox 360 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  41. ^ a b "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End for Wii Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  42. ^ Buchanan, Levi (May 25, 2007). "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End Review (Cell)". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2014.

External links[edit]