Pivaloyl chloride

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Pivaloyl chloride
Pivaloylchloride structuur.png
Pivaloyl-chloride-3D-spacefill.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2,2-Dimethylpropanoyl chloride
Other names
Trimethylacetyl chloride; Pivaloyl chloride; Pivalyl chloride; neopentanoylchloride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
102382
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.019.929 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 221-921-6
UNII
UN number 2438
  • InChI=1S/C5H9ClO/c1-5(2,3)4(6)7/h1-3H3
    Key: JVSFQJZRHXAUGT-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC(C)(C)C(=O)Cl
Properties
C5H9ClO
Molar mass 120.58 g·mol−1
Density 0.985
Melting point −57 °C (−71 °F; 216 K)
Boiling point 105.5 °C (221.9 °F; 378.6 K)
1.412
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS02: FlammableGHS05: CorrosiveGHS06: ToxicGHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H225, H290, H302, H314, H330
P210, P233, P234, P240, P241, P242, P243, P260, P264, P270, P271, P280, P284, P301+P312, P301+P330+P331, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P310, P320, P321, P330, P363, P370+P378, P390, P403+P233, P403+P235, P404, P405, P501
Flash point 8 °C (46 °F; 281 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

2,2-Dimethylpropanoyl chloride is a branched-chain acyl chloride.[1] It was first made by Aleksandr Butlerov in 1874 by reacting pivalic acid with phosphorus pentachloride.[2]

Pivaloyl chloride is used as an input in the manufacture of some drugs, insecticides and herbicides.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2,2-dimethylpropanoyl chloride". ChemSynthesis. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  2. ^ Buttlerow, A. (1874). "Ueber die Trimethylessigsäure". Justus Liebig's Annalen der Chemie (in German). 173 (2): 355–375. doi:10.1002/jlac.18741730217.