Pizza by the slice

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Pizza by the slice in a pizza box for take-out

Pizza by the slice is a fast food sold by pizzerias and food stands, making it also often a street food. The pizza slices may be plain or have various toppings.[1] Some restaurants and pizza stands only sell pizza by the slice, while others sell both slices and whole pizzas. The jumbo slice is a large-sized slice of New York-style pizza made in areas of Washington, D.C. Pizza al taglio is a style of rectangular slice of pizza that originated in Rome and is typically sold by weight.

Overview[edit]

Some pizzerias and food stands sell pizza by the slice and whole pizza pies, and some only sell slices.[1] Pizza by the slice is typically pre-baked and pre-sliced, and is characteristically kept warm under heat lamps.[1][2] Slices are sometimes re-heated or have toppings added before going back into the oven briefly. Selling pizza by the slice offers an economic and speedy dining option to a purchaser while optimizing profits for the seller, as the total value of a pie's slices typically is considerably more than selling a whole pie.[1] The price of pizza slices is also typically significantly less than the cost of a whole pie.[1]

Pizza by the slice is prevalent in the United States.[1][2] There are over 1,000 pizzerias and "slice shops" in New York City[3][4] selling New York-style pizza by the slice,[4] with Sicilian pizza slices also often available.[5][6] It is a common street food there,[7] and the most popular way pizza is ordered. There is a lively competition for which pizzeria sells the "best" slice in the city.[8]

The dish is common in some areas of the Balkans[9] such as Bulgaria.[9][10]

Pizza by the slice is also manufactured frozen, and is sometimes packaged in individual microwavable portions.[11]

Jumbo slice[edit]

The jumbo slice is an oversized slice of New York-style pizza[13] sold in areas of Washington, D.C.,[14] especially favored as a late-night snack by bargoers after closing time.[13][15]

Pizza al taglio[edit]

Pizza al taglio is an Italian pizza variety of rectangular pizza that is sold by the slice, typically by weight.[16][17] The dish originated in Rome, Italy, and is common there, as well as being sold elsewhere around the world.[18][19][20][where?] The dough for Pizza al taglio is sometimes parbaked ahead of time, allowing sauce and various toppings to be added later and the pie finished in the oven when needed.[21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Smith, A.F. (2007). The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink. Oxford Companions. Oxford University Press, USA. p. pt490. ISBN 978-0-19-530796-2. Archived from the original on November 28, 2016. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Pizza Today. Pro Tech Publishing and Communications. 2010. p. 48. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  3. ^ Crowley, Chris (September 12, 2017). "Times Critic Says New York's Best Pizza Is in New Jersey". Grub Street. Archived from the original on January 29, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  4. ^ a b Smith, A.F.; Oliver, G. (2015). Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City. Oxford University Press. p. 462. ISBN 978-0-19-939702-0. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  5. ^ New York. New York Magazine Company. 1975. pp. 32–33. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  6. ^ Weinstein, Lauren R. (November 1, 2015). "The Ten Best Old-School Pizzas in NYC". Village Voice. Archived from the original on February 1, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  7. ^ Stern, J.; Stern, M. (2011). Lexicon of Real American Food. Lyons Press. p. pt211. ISBN 978-0-7627-6830-1. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  8. ^ Keshner, Andrew (January 31, 2018). "Judge dishes Famous Joe's Pizza partial win in copycat suit". NY Daily News. Archived from the original on January 3, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Kraig, B.; Sen, C.T. (2013). Street Food Around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. ABC-CLIO. p. 36. ISBN 978-1-59884-955-4. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  10. ^ Strnadel, L.; Erdley, P. (2012). Bulgaria (Other Places Travel Guide). Other Places Publishing. p. 82. ISBN 978-0-9822619-9-6. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  11. ^ Hoover's Handbook of Private Companies 2005. Hoover's Handbook of Private Companies. Hoover's Business Press. 2005. p. 437. ISBN 978-1-57311-102-7. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  12. ^ Brandweek. Adweek L.P. 2003. p. 226. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  13. ^ a b Stern, J.; Stern, M. (2011). Lexicon of Real American Food. Lyons Press. p. 169. ISBN 978-0-7627-6830-1. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  14. ^ Morgan, S. (2015). 100 Things to do in Washington DC before you die. 100 Things to Do Before You Die. Reedy Press. p. 18. ISBN 978-1-935806-92-9. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  15. ^ Nelson, E. (2016). The Beltway Bible: A Totally Serious A-Z Guide to Our No-Good, Corrupt, Incompetent, Terrible, Depressing, and Sometimes Hilarious Government. St. Martin's Press. p. 203. ISBN 978-1-250-09925-9. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  16. ^ The World's Best Street Food: Where to Find it & How to Make it. Lonely Planet Publications. 2012. p. pt129. ISBN 978-1-74321-664-4. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  17. ^ Lombardi, M. (2007). Essential Italy: Rome, Florence, Venice and the Top Spots in Between. Fodor's Essential Italy: Rome, Florence, Venice & the Top Spots in Between. Fodor's Travel Publications. p. 419. ISBN 978-1-4000-1746-1. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  18. ^ Braimbridge, S.; Glynn, J.; Halsey, K.; Jones, C.L. (2003). A Little Taste of Italy. Murdoch Books. p. 16. ISBN 978-0-86411-947-6. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  19. ^ Marchetti, D.; An, S. (2013). The Glorious Vegetables of Italy. Chronicle Books. p. 164. ISBN 978-1-4521-2964-8. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  20. ^ "Know These Exotic Varieties Of Pizza And Order Like A Pro". NDTV Food. January 17, 2018. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  21. ^ Manfredi, Stefano (August 20, 2017). "Stefano Manfredi's Roman pizza with eggplant parmigiana recipe". The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2018.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]