PlateCulture

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PlateCulture is a sharing economy platform that enables guests to dine at a local host's home. The site was founded by Lithuanian entrepreneurs Reda Stare and Edvinas Bartkus. It launched in 2013 with a focus on tourists and locals in Southeast Asia.[1][2][3][4]

It currently offers two mobile apps for Android and iPhone users as well as web-based platform.

PlateCulture allows hosts to list their kitchens through the site and guests to make bookings to dine at a host's home restaurant. Both parties leave a review about their experience.[5] In November 2015, the BBC noted the platform's positive impact on language learning opportunities between locals and travellers.[6]

In September 2015, VICE journalist Lauren Razavi described PlateCulture as "an Asian startup that's essentially the Airbnb of food" in a feature story profiling a Persian chef who runs a home restaurant in Kuala Lumpur through the platform.[7]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Kristina Mariswamy (10 June 2013). "Indulge 'Off the eaten track' with Plate Culture". FZ. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 
  2. ^ Rachel Croucher (1 May 2013). "Fostering intercultural communication through food: Lithuanian entrepreneurs speak". The Lithuanian Tribune. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 
  3. ^ Frances Cha (21 May 2014). "Meet locals, eat their food: New Asian dining trend". CNN. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 
  4. ^ Gabey Goh (5 June 2013). "At PlateCulture, a meal is more than just food". Digital News Asia. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 
  5. ^ Anh-Minh Do (8 October 2013). "Don’t eat at a restaurant, use PlateCulture and eat at someone’s house". Tech in Asia. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 
  6. ^ Lauren Razavi (26 November 2015). "The best new way to learn a language?". BBC. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 
  7. ^ Lauren Razavi (16 September 2015). "This Woman’s Living Room Is Kuala Lumpur’s Best Persian Restaurant". VICE Munchies. Retrieved 28 December 2015. 

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