Plexus

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A plexus (from the Latin for "braid") is a branching network of the vessels or nerves. The vessels may be blood vessels (veins, capillaries) or lymphatic vessels. The nerves are typically axons outside the central nervous system.

The standard plural form in English is plexuses.[1][2][3]

Plexuses[edit]

The four primary nerve plexuses are the cervical plexus, brachial plexus, lumbar plexus, and the sacral plexus.
The choroid plexus is a part of the central nervous system in the brain and consists of capillaries, ventricles, and ependymal cells.

In invertebrates[edit]

The plexus is the characteristic form of nervous system in the coelenterates and persists with modifications in the flatworms. The nerves of the radially symmetric echinoderms also take this form, where a plexus underlies the ectoderm of these animals and deeper in the body other nerve cells form plexuses of limited extent.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster, Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster. Paywalled reference work.
  2. ^ Merriam-Webster, Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, Merriam-Webster. Paywalled reference work.
  3. ^ Elsevier, Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, Elsevier. Paywalled reference work.