Plymouth GTX

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Plymouth GTX
Plymouth GTX ('10 Centropolis Laval).jpg
Overview
ManufacturerChrysler Corporation
Production1966–1971 (44,178 units)
AssemblySt. Louis, Missouri, United States
Body and chassis
ClassMuscle car
LayoutFR layout
PlatformB-body

The Plymouth GTX is an automobile introduced as the Belvedere GTX in 1967 by the Plymouth division. It was positioned as a mid-sized upscale-trimmed performance muscle car through the 1971 model year.

1967[edit]

First generation
1967GTX.jpg
Overview
Also calledPlymouth Belvedere GTX
Production1967
Body and chassis
Body style
RelatedDodge Charger
Plymouth Belvedere
Plymouth Satellite
Powertrain
Engine426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi V8
440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8
Transmission4-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase116.0 in (2,946 mm)

The GTX was based on the Belvedere, but differentiated by blacked out grille and special rear fascia, fiberglass simulated hood scoops with optional racing stripes, a chrome "pop-open" fuel filler cap, and a tachometer mounted on the center console.[1]

The GTX was positioned as a "gentleman's" muscle car.[2] Standard was Plymouth's 440 cu in (7.2 L) V8 engine called the "Super Commando 440" rated at 375 hp (280 kW). Optional was Chrysler's 426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi. A heavy duty suspension system was also standard.

Performance[edit]

Model 0-60 mph 1/4 mile time Source
1967 440 6.5 seconds 15.2 seconds @ 97 mph (156 km/h) [2]
1967 426 Hemi 4.8 seconds 13.5 seconds @ 105 mph (169 km/h) [2]

1968-1970[edit]

Second generation
68 Plymouth GTX (7331425156).jpg
1968 Plymouth GTX convertible
Overview
Model years1968–1970
Body and chassis
Body style
PlatformB-body
RelatedDodge Charger
Plymouth Belvedere
Plymouth Satellite
Powertrain
Engine426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi V8
440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8
Transmission4-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase116.0 in (2,946 mm)
Length202.7 in (5,149 mm)
Width76.4 in (1,941 mm)
Height54.7 in (1,389 mm)

1968[edit]

1968 Plymouth GTX

Chrysler introduced major changes in the design of the 1968 model Plymouth B-bodies and the GTX was given a completely new look. A new hourglass body replaced the previous rectilinear design. The high performance 440 was standard in the GTX. The TorqueFlite automatic transmission was standard on the GTX, while it was an extra cost option in the Road Runner. The GTX used the Sport Satellite trim and was offered in two body styles, a two-door convertible and a two-door hardtop (no B-pillar). All featured dual horizontal "racing stripes" on the lower sides ending with a GTX emblem ahead of the rear wheel openings.

The GTX was positioned to be upscale model of the Plymouth Road Runner by adding a touch of luxury to performance.[3] The new budget performance version of the Belvedere featured the new 383 cu in (6.3 L) "Super Commando" V8 (renamed the "Road Runner 383"). It also had less insulation and comfort items, which reduced weight and kept it in the low price field.

1969[edit]

1969 Plymouth GTX

In 1969, the GTX's sales dropped when the Road Runner was also offered in a convertible body style. The GTX received minor cosmetic changes to the tail lights and grille, as well as the side marker lights. An optional Air Grabber hood (standard on Hemi-engined cars) featured functional openings on both sides of the hood that were controlled from the dash.[4]

The 1969 GTX received had standard black lower body side paint in place of the previous stripes. The standard 440 V8 was still rated at 375 hp (280 kW). This was the last year that the convertible model was available on the GTX (VIN RS27). Total production was 701 GTX convertibles in 1969. Of those, eleven were equipped with the 426 Hemi; four 4-speeds and seven TorqueFlite automatics.

1970[edit]

1970 GTX with Air Grabber hood

The 1970 GTX received a minor redesign with a new grille and rear taillights. Sales were low as the car did not look much different from the Road Runner. Stylists made the lines smoother, and a "power bulge" hood was introduced, as well as non-functional rear brake air scoops. The convertible body style was no longer available. The Air Grabber hood returned, but instead of having two narrow openings running length-wise as in 1969, it had one opening scoop located on the power bulge. The GTX was available with the standard 440 four-barrel carburetor. Optional were the 440+6 barrel (three two-barrel carburetors) and the 426 Hemi. In keeping with the GTX marketing strategy, the 1970 model included many standard features.

The only other performance luxury model in Plymouth's lineup was the full-size Sport Fury GT, built on the C-Body platform. The GT was added to the lineup in 1970.

1971[edit]

Third generation
71gtx3.jpg
1971 Plymouth GTX with aftermarket modifications
Overview
Model years1971
Body and chassis
Body style2-door hardtop
RelatedDodge Charger
Dodge Coronet
Plymouth Road Runner
Plymouth Satellite
Powertrain
Engine440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8 426 cu in (7.0 L) 426 Hemi V8
Transmission4-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase115.0 in (2,921 mm)
Length203.2 in (5,161 mm)
Width79.1 in (2,009 mm)
Height52.9 in (1,344 mm)
440+6 engine in a 1971 Plymouth Road Runner

The B-body was redesigned for 1971 and featured rounded "fuselage" styling with a raked windshield, hidden cowl, and a loop-type front bumper around a deeply inset grille and headlights. This was the final year for the GTX as a stand-alone model. The convertible body style was dropped.

Engine choices were 440 four-barrel, 440 with three two-barrels (Six Pack), and 426 Hemi. Emission restrictions such as lower compression ratios and faster-acting choke operation lowered the base 440 output by 5 hp (3.7 kW), to 370 hp (280 kW). The 440 Six Barrel was down to 385 hp (287 kW), but the Hemi was still rated at 425 hp (317 kW). Due partly to rising insurance rates on muscle cars, sales were low. There were less than 3,000 units produced in 1971.

For 1972 through 1974, any Road Runner ordered with the optional 440 was renamed Road Runner GTX and included the badging of both previous models.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "1967-1974 Plymouth GTX: muscle cars with all the trimmings". allpar.com. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Plymouth GTX - History". Musclecarclub.com. Retrieved 26 January 2018.
  3. ^ Eisenschenk, Wes (2017). 1969 Plymouth Road Runner. CarTech. p. 10. ISBN 9781613253021. Retrieved 26 January 2018.
  4. ^ Gunnell, John (2005). American Cars of the 1960s: A Decade of Diversity. Krause Publications. pp. 28–29. ISBN 0896891313. Retrieved 27 January 2018.

External links[edit]