Pocahontas, Missouri

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Pocahontas, Missouri
Village
Pocahontas at dusk
Pocahontas at dusk
Location of Pocahontas, Missouri
Location of Pocahontas, Missouri
Coordinates: 37°30′4″N 89°38′19″W / 37.50111°N 89.63861°W / 37.50111; -89.63861Coordinates: 37°30′4″N 89°38′19″W / 37.50111°N 89.63861°W / 37.50111; -89.63861
Country United States
State Missouri
County Cape Girardeau
Area[1]
 • Total 0.10 sq mi (0.26 km2)
 • Land 0.10 sq mi (0.26 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 584 ft (178 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 114
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 116
 • Density 1,140.0/sq mi (440.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 63779
Area code(s) 573
FIPS code 29-58628[4]
GNIS feature ID 0724682[5]

Pocahontas is a village in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, United States. The population was 114 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Cape GirardeauJackson, MO-IL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Name[edit]

Tradition has that Samuel Green opened a post office and started the town, and was required by the government to provide a name for the town. Samuel Green had fallen in love with a princess of the Shawnee and Delaware tribes living along Apple Creek, but she had left the region along with the Shawnee and Delaware when they moved west. Green intended to name the town after this woman whom he longed for. Unfortunately, the name of this princess was difficult to pronounce and nearly as impossible to spell, so when registering the town’s name, Green instead decided to substitute his love’s name for the name of a historic Indian princess Pocahontas, of colonial Virginia fame. [6] [7]

History[edit]

The early inhabitants of the area were the Mississippian Mound Builders, who were part of the Mississippian culture. The Mound Builders went into decline in the 12th and 13th centuries, resulting in a depopulation of the area. In the later part of the 18th century French and Spanish officials allowed the immigration of Shawnee and Delaware Indians from Ohio. In the 1820s these Indians were moved further west, with only a few remaining behind. The last of the Indians to stay were removed from the area in 1857.[8]

Early American settlers to the area were the Abernathy and Little families who farmed the land around present-day Pocahontas. Samuel Green, an Englishman, purchased land from Joseph Abernathy and operated the Green Station general store and post office. The Applecreek Presbyterian Church was established in 1869. Around 1858 German and Austrian immigrants began to settle around Pocahontas. St. John Iowa Synod Lutheran Church was founded in 1870, and in 1889 Zion Lutheran Church Missouri Synod was built. It was incorporated as a town in 1893.[9] A flour mill was constructed by John Hatcher and today the mill is still operated as the Bowman Milling Company. A public school and two Lutheran parochial schools were also established. The town was also once home to four stores, several shops, a planning mill and lumber yard.[10]

Geography[edit]

Pocahontas is located at 37°30′4″N 89°38′19″W / 37.50111°N 89.63861°W / 37.50111; -89.63861 (37.501194, -89.638498).[11]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.10 square miles (0.26 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 47
1900 100
1910 125 25.0%
1920 156 24.8%
1930 115 −26.3%
1940 119 3.5%
1950 130 9.2%
1960 128 −1.5%
1970 127 −0.8%
1980 130 2.4%
1990 90 −30.8%
2000 127 41.1%
2010 114 −10.2%
Est. 2015 117 [12] 2.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 114 people, 44 households, and 30 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,140.0 inhabitants per square mile (440.2/km2). There were 52 housing units at an average density of 520.0 per square mile (200.8/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 99.12% White and 0.88% Black or African American.

There were 44 households of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.8% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.00.

The median age in the village was 41 years. 22.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.5% were from 25 to 44; 30.7% were from 45 to 64; and 14% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.9% male and 49.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 127 people, 45 households, and 32 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,280.9 people per square mile (490.3/km²). There were 52 housing units at an average density of 524.5/sq mi (200.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 100.00% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.79% of the population.

There were 45 households out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 20.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.36.

In the town the population was spread out with 30.7% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 84.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $36,250, and the median income for a family was $41,667. Males had a median income of $29,500 versus $18,333 for females. The per capita income for the town was $13,650. There were no families and 3.7% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 12.5% of those over 64.

Classification[edit]

Under Missouri Revised Statute 72-050 [2], towns with populations under 500 at the time of passage (1939) were declared to be villages. Having been incorporated in 1893 [3], Pocahontas was unaffected by this statute, and is classified as a town despite its small population.

Photo gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Mary Koeberl Rechenberg, "[1]." Southeast Missourian. August 5, 2013.
  7. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 270. 
  8. ^ Louis Houck (1908). "A History of Missouri: From the Earliest Explorations and Settlements Until the Admission of the State Into the Union". 
  9. ^ History of Southeast Missouri: A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People and Its Principal Interests, Volume 1. Lewis Publishing Company. 1912. p. 373. 
  10. ^ "10th Anniversary Edition: The bustling town of Pocahontas". Southeast Missourian. September 29, 2015. 
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  12. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.