Poco Lena

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Poco Lena
Breed Quarter Horse
Discipline Cutting
Sire Poco Bueno
Grandsire King P-234
Dam Sheilwin
Maternal grandsire Pretty Boy
Sex Mare
Foaled 1949
Country United States
Color Bay
Breeder E. Paul Waggoner
Owner E. Paul Waggoner, Don Dodge
Other awards
AQHA Performance Register of Merit
AQHA Champion
AQHA Superior Halter Horse
AQHA Superior Cutting Horse
1959-1960-1961 AQHA High Point Cutting Horse
1959-1960-1961 NCHA World Champion Cutting Mare,br>1954-1955-1959-1960-1961 NCHA Reserve World Champion
NCHA Silver Award
NCHA Bronze Award
Honors
NCHA Hall of Fame
American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame

Poco Lena (1949–1968) was an outstanding cutting mare, and dam of two famous Quarter horse cutting horses and stallions: Doc O'Lena and Dry Doc.[1]

Life[edit]

Poco Lena was foaled in 1949, the daughter of Poco Bueno out of a daughter of Pretty Boy named Sheilwin. She traced to Peter McCue on both her sire's and her dam's side.[2]

With the American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA) Poco Lena earned her AQHA Championship, a Performance Register of Merit, a Superior Cutting Horse award and a Superior Halter Horse award.[3] She was also the AQHA High Point Cutting Horse in 1959, 1960, and 1961.[3] With the National Cutting Horse Association (or NCHA) she earned a total of $99,819.61 in cutting contests in her career.[4] She earned a Certificate of Ability, as well as a Bronze and a Silver Award with the NCHA.[5] She was also inducted into the NCHA Hall of Fame.[6]

In late 1961, Poco Lena foundered. She recovered, and was showing well when in October 1962 her owner, B. A. Skipper Jr., died in a plane crash. In the confusion, Poco Lena was left in a trailer for four days without food or water. She foundered again, and never competed again.[1] Eventually she was bought by the owners of Doc Bar, Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Jensen. After much nursing and effort, Poco Lena produced two foals when bred to Doc Bar – Doc O'Lena and Dry Doc, both of whom won the NCHA Cutting Futurity.[1] However, Poco Lena's founder deteriorated after the birth of Dry Doc, and on December 16, 1968 she was put to sleep.[1]

Poco Lena was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.[7]

Pedigree[edit]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Joe
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zantanon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jeanette
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
King P-234
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Strait Horse
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jabalina
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Traveler
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Poco Bueno
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Joe
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Old Poco Bueno
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Virginia D
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miss Taylor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hickory Bill
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Hickory Bill
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Poco Lena
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Harmon Baker
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dodger
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Froggie
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pretty Boy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tip
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Maud
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bess
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sheilwin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yellow Jacket
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Blackburn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Siss
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Blackburn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Waggoner Ranch mare
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Swan Legends 3 pp. 98–111
  2. ^ Poco Lena Pedigree at All Breed Pedigree
  3. ^ a b Wagoner Quarter Horse Reference 1974 Edition p. 544
  4. ^ Poco Lena NCHA Earnings
  5. ^ Pitzer Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires p. 97
  6. ^ NCHA Hall of Fame
  7. ^ AQHA Hall of Fame

References[edit]

  • All Breed Pedigree Database Pedigree for Poco Lena retrieved on June 26, 2007
  • AQHA Hall of Fame accessed on October 30, 2011
  • NCHA Hall of Fame retrieved on March 1, 2011
  • Pitzer, Andrea Laycock (1987). The Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires. Tacoma, WA: Premier Pedigrees. 
  • Poco Lena NCHA Earnings retrieved on March 1, 2011
  • Swan, Kathy, ed. (1997). Legends 3:Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and Mares. Colorado Springs: Western Horseman. 
  • Wagoner, Dan (1974). Quarter Horse Reference 1974 Edition. Grapevine, TX: Equine Research. 

External links[edit]