Pokémon Go live events

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Since its release in 2016, multiple real-life events and gatherings based on the augmented reality (AR) mobile game Pokémon Go has been officially held or endorsed by its developer Niantic Labs outside of unofficial player gatherings. Typically, the events involve increased in-game rewards for participating players and are often held in cooperation with local organizations or governments.

The common repeating events are the Pokémon Go Fest held annually, the Pokémon Go Safari Zone which has been held in multiple countries, and the monthly "Community Day" events. Player counts for the larger events range from thousands up to two million players[1] in one event. Due to large concentrations of players all using their mobile phones in such events, the large gatherings have resulted in network disruptions, which have resulted in a lawsuit against Niantic.

Background[edit]

Pokémon Go[edit]

A gathering of Pokémon Go players in Düsseldorf, Germany, in August 2016

Pokémon Go (or Pokémon GO) is an augmented reality mobile game developed by Niantic Labs, based on the Pokémon franchise of Game Freak which began to release in July 2016. The game centers around catching various Pokémon creatures by navigating the in-game map based on the player's actual location and nearby landmarks.[2] Shortly after its release, the game went viral, breaking multiple records and being installed on millions of devices within weeks of its initial release.[3] With the game's massive initial player base, landmarks would gather crowds of players taking advantage of the "Pokéstops" which provide player with items, to the point where certain landmarks such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Arlington National Cemetery explicitly requested players to not play the game within the grounds.[4] On the other hand, the traffic generated by the game was capitalized on by some local businesses.[5]

During the first weeks after the game's release, multiple events and gatherings organized by the players happened across the world. Examples include a single gathering in Sydney days after the game's launch which attracted over 2,000 players,[6] and a Facebook-based bar crawl in San Francisco for the game collected thousands of responses and a significant number of attendees.[7] Another player gathering at Chicago's Millennium Park gathered around 5,000 players.[8] A zoo in Bristol, which held a Go event, received more attendance than its capacity and had to turn away players.[9]

Several months after release, the player count for the game declined, losing some one-third of its peak of 45 million active users by mid-August 2016.[10] Niantic held the first in-game event – where different Pokémon are encountered in the game and players receive increased rewards – on Halloween of 2016, and the revenue generated by the game spiked during the period.[11] Go had several more in-game events that year, including on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas.[12][13] In one November 2016 event, Niantic increased the spawn rate of the otherwise rare Pokémon Lapras in areas affected by the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, intended to help recover tourism in the area.[14]

Shortly after Go's release, during an interview with Recode, Niantic CEO John Hanke stated that Niantic intended to hold official events, due to their experience with their previous game Ingress. He stated that the intent of the events for Go would be to have "people coming together, having an event that moves you through an interesting part of the city so it's part walking tour, part competition, and then having a big get-together at the end where we're announcing winners [and] leaderboards." He also added that the lack of events in the early stages of the game was to ensure that Niantic could handle the expected large crowds in such events.[15]

Ingress events[edit]

Prior to the release of Go, Niantic had developed and released a similar AR game called Ingress. A component of Ingress is a series of real-life events held directly by Niantic across multiple cities. Its first post-beta event series, held in 2013, spanned over 9 weeks and involved 39 cities worldwide.[16] The Pokémon Company (TPC) CEO Tsunekazu Ishihara was also an Ingress player, which according to Hanke eased cooperation between Niantic and TPC for Go.[17]

One type of Ingress events is known as "Anomalies", where gathered players in a specific location attempt to control the landmarks to score points for their factions, with clear victory objectives.[18] Anomalies can have attendances of upwards of 1,000 players,[19] and Hanke noted in the 2016 Recode interview that an event in Japan gathered over 10,000.[15] Additionally, Ingress also holds monthly "First Saturday" events and #NL1331 meetups (involving a mobile van).[20]

Pokémon Go Fest[edit]

2017[edit]

Players in Grant Park during Pokémon Go Fest 2017

In June 2017, Niantic announced a new "Pokémon Go Fest" event, which was held in Chicago's Grant Park on 22 July 2017 as the game's first official real-life event.[21] Tickets to the event, priced at US$ 20, were sold out within fifteen minutes of its release for sale, despite the details of the event not having been revealed then. Scalpers were reported to have attempted to resell the tickets through resellers for inflated prices.[22] Later, it was revealed that players worldwide and players at Grant Park would contribute towards a catching target, which would unlock rewards.[23]

On the date of the event itself, The Chicago Tribune estimated that 20,000 players attended, some having traveled across the United States or even from abroad.[24][25] During the event itself, however, mobile networks in the park overloaded, resulting in the attendees being nearly unable to play the game. Niantic acknowledged the issue by around 2 p.m., and its CEO Hanke was booed when speaking on stage in front of the players.[26] In an attempt to alleviate the network pressure, Niantic extended the in-game event area to two miles outside of Grant Park, and continued the event throughout the weekend. The event in Grant Park was ended on 5 p.m. local time, two hours before it was scheduled.[25] Multiple media outlets called the event a "disaster".[25][26][27] A spokesperson from Niantic remarked that the company's staff were "horrified" with the outcome of the event.[28]

Immediately after the event, Niantic refunded the tickets of the attendees, in addition to giving their accounts US$ 100 worth of in-game currency and the legendary Pokémon Lugia, meant to have been released during the event.[25] Niantic released a blog post by Hanke the following day, blaming both technical issues with the game – which was resolved according to the post – and network oversaturation due to insufficient availability of mobile cell sites. Also according to the blog post, 7.7 million Pokémon were captured by players in Downtown Chicago during the ensuing weekend.[29] In a 2018 interview with The Guardian, Hanke remarked that "the first six hours of [Pokémon Go Fest] were among the most challenging of my professional life."[30]

Later on, a Go Fest attendant Jonathan Norton filed a class action lawsuit to the Circuit Court of Cook County against Niantic.[31] The lawsuit was settled after Niantic agreed to pay US$ 1.575 million to compensate for non-ticket fees such as accommodation and transportation.[32]

2018[edit]

Despite the outcome of the 2017 Go Fest, Niantic announced a second Go Fest to be held again in Chicago, at Lincoln Park, on 7 May 2018. Unlike the previous Fest, the event was held across two days – 14 and 15 July.[33] The area allocated for the event was larger, with attendees being limited to one of the two days, and additional temporary cellular network facilities were provided by major providers.[34] Like in 2017, tickets for the event sold out rapidly, with tickets running out on the official website within half an hour and scalpers reselling the tickets for increased prices.[35]

During the event, Lincoln Park was decorated with props resembling various biomes which could be found in the game. As part of the event, Pokémon which are normally rare or only found in other parts of the world spawned in the area.[36] Attendants were also given a chance to complete "Research Quests" in-game in order to encounter the Mythical Pokémon Celebi.[37] According to Niantic, 21,000 people attended the event in Lincoln Park with an additional 180,000 players in Chicago.[38] The event was seen as largely successful, with relatively little technical difficulties in contrast to the 2017 event.[36][39]

2019[edit]

A third Go Fest event was announced on 4 April 2019. The 2019 event, unlike the preceding ones, were to be held in three separate cities – Chicago (Grant Park, held between 13–16 June), Dortmund (Westfalenpark [de], scheduled for 4–7 July) and an initially unannounced Asian city.[40] In the lead-up to the events, Niantic held a "Pokémon Go Snapshot Challenge", centered around the game's augmented reality camera feature, with the contest's main prizes being trips to the Go Fest events.[41] Tickets for the Chicago event were distributed through a random drawing which followed in-game registration.[42]

Pokémon Go Safari Zone[edit]

On 12 July 2017, Niantic announced "Safari Zone" events across several cities in Europe at shopping centers operated by Unibail-Rodamco, held on August and September 2017.[43] The events, where otherwise region-limited Pokémon could be found among others, required registration and had a player limit – for example, the event in Amsterdam was limited to 2,000 players,[44] though unregistered players would still be able to play with increased rewards within the city.[45] However, due to the failure of the 2017 Go Fest event, Niantic delayed some of the Safari Zone events to fall that year.[46]

Later in 2017, another Safari Zone event was held in Tottori Prefecture, Japan, at the Tottori Sand Dunes between 24 and 26 November. According to the local government, 89,000 people attended the event which generated around US$ 16 million in travel and tourism revenue. In the leadup to the event, Niantic brought several influencers in a tour around Japan as a campaign which was named Pokémon Go Travel.[47]

The Summer 2018 iteration of the Safari Zone – announced in conjunction with the 2018 Go Fest as part of a "Summer Tour" – involved a Safari Zone event in Dortmund's Westfalenpark on 30 June and 1 July, and another event in Yokosuka, Japan on 29 August – 2 September.[48][49] The Dortmund event attracted some 170,000 players across the city, thrice the expected amount, with some players reporting network issues during the 2-day event.[50]

Yokosuka's 2018 Safari Zone event, held in three parks, took up large portions of the city, with speakers playing Go's in-game music and businesses handing out Pokémon merchandise.[51] Niantic reported that 65,000 players went to one of the three parks and that 200,000 users played in Yokosuka during the event.[52]

A Safari Zone event was held in Chiayi County of Taiwan between 26 February and 3 March 2018, during the Chiayi Lantern Festival. In total, around 200,000 players went to Chiayi – which had a population of around 500,000 – for the event.[53][54] Between 1 and 5 November 2018, another Safari Zone event was held in Tainan, Taiwan. While initially expected to have 200,000 attendants, the event ended up gathering 560,000 participants, with 80,000 during the last day (a Monday) alone. Around one-tenth of the figure were players from overseas, mainly from Japan and Hong Kong. The event, which generated an estimated NT$ 1.5 billion for the local economy, was the result of a cooperation between Niantic and the local government, though the former did not receive royalties.[55]

The first Safari Zone event of 2019 was held in Porto Alegre, Brazil on 25 January. 130,000 players registered to join the event, though only 25,000 were granted tickets. The event was largely conducted alongside the banks of the Guaíba River.[56][57] Niantic later also announced another Safari Zone, held between 18 and 22 April at Sentosa, Singapore.[58] 125,000 tickets were issued, 20 percent of those to non-Singaporeans.[59] After the event concluded, Niantic reported an attendance of 95,000 players.[60]

Community Days[edit]

Niantic announced Community Days, monthly worldwide in-game events where certain Pokémon species spawn in large amounts, in January 2018, with the first iteration being a "Pikachu day" on 20 January that year.[61] Community Days in 2018 have featured Pikachu (20 January), Dratini (24 February), Bulbasaur (25 March), Mareep (15 April), Charmander (19 May), Larvitar (16 June), Squirtle (8 July), Eevee (11–12 August), Chikorita (22 September), Beldum (21 October), and Cyndaquil (10 November), with a special event between 30 November and 2 December which featured all eleven previous Pokémon.[62] As of June 2019, Community Day events in 2019 have featured Totodile (12 January), Swinub (16 February), Treecko (23 March), Bagon (13 April), Torchic (19 May) and Slakoth (8 June).[63]

Community Days – intended to draw players together especially in major cities -[64] drew crowds in hotspots such as Seattle's Green Lake and Brighton and Hove's Hove Park.[65][66]

Other events[edit]

Outside of the events mentioned above, Niantic has held multiple one-off events, official or in cooperation with other organizations. On 7 May 2017, the first real-life event was held in Charlotte, North Carolina.[67] The first such official Go event in Europe was held in Chester, United Kingdom, on 22–23 July 2017 during the annual Chester Heritage Festival in partnership with local non-profit Big Heritage. It was estimated that during the two days, between 16 and 18 thousand players visited the city.[68][69]

Between 9 and 15 August 2017, during the Pikachu Outbreak event held by TPC, Niantic held Pokémon Go Park events in two parks within the city of Yokohama, Japan.[70] On 14 August, during the aforementioned event, a Pokémon Go Stadium event in which thousands of players attempted to catch Mewtwo.[1] The event was livestreamed.[71] In total, during the seven days of the event 2 million players participated in Yokohama,[1] with the Pikachu Outbreak event overall recording 3 million participants including the Go players.[72] Due to the disruption to the city's traffic caused by the large numbers of attendants, Yokohama declined to host a Go event the following year.[51]

In partnership with the Knight Foundation, an event was held in Akron, Ohio on 26–27 August 2017.[73] Niantic also partnered with the Viva Calle San Jose event on 17 September 2017,[74] and a second iteration of the partnership was held on 23 September 2018.[75] Go also held scavenger hunts in the Philadelphia's 2017 Philly Free Streets[76] and in Los Angeles in partnership with CicLAvia on 10 December 2017.[77]

Held alongside the annual Pokémon Festa, between 4 and 12 November 2017 Go had an event held across South Korea.[78] The event was repeated the following year, centered around Lotte Mall of Seoul, between 21 and 23 September 2018.[79]

On Earth Day of April 2018, an "Earth Day Cleanup" event was launched, which rewarded players globally if sufficient players signed up to join cleanup events across 12 countries.[80] Niantic reported over 4,200 players signing up with 6,600 kg of trash collected across 19 countries.[81]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Skrebels, Joe (16 August 2017). "Pokemon Go: 2 Million Players Participated in Pikachu Outbreak Event in Japan". IGN. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  2. ^ Statt, Nick (5 July 2016). "Pokémon Go is now rolling out for iOS and Android". The Verge. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  3. ^ Perez, Sarah (13 July 2016). "Pokémon Go tops Twitter's daily users, sees more engagement than Facebook". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 21 March 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  4. ^ "Pokémon Go: US holocaust museum asks players to stay away". The Guardian. 13 July 2016. Archived from the original on 2 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  5. ^ Frank, Allegra (13 July 2016). "Pokémon Go to join with business sponsors to get buyers in stores". Polygon. Archived from the original on 16 April 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  6. ^ Plunkett, Luke (10 July 2016). "When Over 2000 People Turn Up To Play Pokémon Go". Kotaku. Archived from the original on 21 June 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  7. ^ "Thousands gather for Pokemon Go event in San Francisco". ABC7 San Francisco. 21 July 2016. Archived from the original on 6 October 2016. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  8. ^ Maffei, Lucia (18 July 2016). "5K people turn up to catch Pokémon in Chicago". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 1 December 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  9. ^ "Bristol Zoo to hold a second Pokémon Go event". ITV News. 2 August 2016. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  10. ^ Kastrenakes, Jacob (23 August 2016). "People are quickly losing interest in Pokémon Go". The Verge. Archived from the original on 19 October 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  11. ^ "Pokemon Go Gets a Huge Revenue Boost Thanks to Halloween Event". Geek.com. 1 November 2016. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  12. ^ Hern, Alex (13 December 2016). "Pokémon Go adds Togepi and Pichu and Christmas Pikachu". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 21 August 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  13. ^ Reynolds, Matthew (24 November 2016). "Pokémon Go Thanksgiving event update – When it ends, using a Lucky Egg and everything else you need to know". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on 9 October 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  14. ^ Ajima, Shinya (11 November 2016). "Rare Pokemon deployed to help recovery in Tohoku quake zones". The Japan Times. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  15. ^ a b Johnson, Eric (4 October 2016). "Full transcript: Niantic CEO John Hanke talks Pokémon Go on Recode Decode". Recode. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  16. ^ Takakashi, Dean (15 October 2013). "Google Niantic's Ingress augmented-reality game grows with real-time events". VentureBeat. Archived from the original on 9 June 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  17. ^ Mac, Ryan (23 August 2016). "The Inside Story Of 'Pokémon GO's' Evolution From Google Castoff To Global Phenomenon". Forbes. Archived from the original on 9 October 2016. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  18. ^ "Ingress Anomalies Mix Live Events with In-App Gameplay". Alternate Reality Gaming Network. 24 April 2014. Archived from the original on 13 June 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  19. ^ Calhoun, Bryan (13 December 2016). "Ingress: The Location Game That Silently Outlasted Pokémon Go – CGMagazine". Computer Gaming Magazine. Archived from the original on 1 March 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  20. ^ Henry, Alan (6 October 2015). "How Ingress, Google's Real-World Smartphone Game, Got Me Out of My Shell". Lifehacker. Archived from the original on 30 March 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  21. ^ Hollister, Sean (8 June 2017). "Pokemon Go's first real-world event hits Chicago on July 22". CNET. Archived from the original on 26 March 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  22. ^ Beck, Kellen (20 June 2017). "Ticket scalpers are ruining the first-ever 'Pokémon Go' festival". Mashable. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  23. ^ Plante, Corey (12 July 2017). "The Fate of 'Pokémon GO' Players Around the World Rests With Chicago". Inverse. Archived from the original on 21 September 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  24. ^ Schmidt, Rose; Ellis, Ralph (22 July 2017). "Pokemon Go festival attendees to get refunds". CNN. Archived from the original on 27 August 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  25. ^ a b c d Farokhmanesh, Megan (25 July 2017). "I went to Pokémon Go Fest, and it was a disaster". The Verge. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  26. ^ a b Hern, Alex (24 July 2017). "Pokémon Go fans enraged as first festival ends in connectivity disaster". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  27. ^ Frank, Allegra (16 August 2017). "After Pokémon Go Fest disaster, Niantic finds some success with outdoor events". Polygon. Archived from the original on 26 November 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  28. ^ Frank, Allegra (24 July 2017). "Niantic 'horrified' by Pokémon Go Fest". Polygon. Archived from the original on 30 July 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  29. ^ "An Update regarding Pokémon GO Fest in Chicago". Niantic Labs. 25 July 2017. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  30. ^ Blain, Louise (20 August 2018). "Harsh headlines, failed festivals and, finally, friends: Pokémon Go, two years on". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  31. ^ Tassin, Paul (31 July 2017). "Pokémon GO Class Action Says Attendees Owed for Failed Festival". Top Class Actions. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  32. ^ Kumparak, Greg (30 March 2018). "Niantic to settle Pokémon GO Fest lawsuit for over $1.5M". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  33. ^ Fogel, Stefanie (7 May 2018). "'Pokémon Go' Fest Returns to Chicago Despite 2017's Disastrous Showing". Variety. Archived from the original on 5 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  34. ^ Ji, Leo (11 July 2018). "Pokémon Go developer, cell service providers say they're ready for weekend Fest". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 24 July 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  35. ^ Gillibrand, Abigail (12 May 2018). "Pokemon GO Fest tickets sell out in half an hour as website suffers problems". Metro. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  36. ^ a b Phillips, Tom (16 July 2018). "Pokémon Go Fest 2018 excised the ghost of Chicago past". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on 26 September 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  37. ^ Frank, Allegra (14 July 2018). "Pokémon Go Fest's surprise new Pokémon is Celebi". Polygon. Archived from the original on 20 August 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  38. ^ Fogel, Stefanie (16 July 2018). "Second Annual Pokémon Go Fest Draws Over 21,000 Attendees". Variety. Archived from the original on 5 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  39. ^ Kim, Yvone (16 July 2018). "Thousands try to catch 'em all at '100 percent' improved Pokémon Go Fest". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 24 July 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  40. ^ McWhertor, Michael (4 April 2019). "Pokémon Go Fest 2019 goes global with three events this summer". Polygon. Archived from the original on 5 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  41. ^ Pelegrin, Williams (12 April 2019). "Niantic announces Pokemon Go snapshot challenge – Android Authority". Android Authority. Retrieved 15 April 2019.
  42. ^ Jones, Gary (24 April 2019). "Pokemon Go Fest tickets get first drawing for Chicago 2019". Express.co.uk. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  43. ^ "Pokemon GO Safari Zone Update: events around the world!". SlashGear. 12 July 2017. Archived from the original on 31 December 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  44. ^ "Pokemon GO Safari Zones Have Player Limits". Game Rant. 18 July 2017. Archived from the original on 23 July 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  45. ^ Hutson, Curt (16 September 2017). "Pokemon Go: How Safari Zone Events Work". Game Rant. Archived from the original on 17 September 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  46. ^ Frank, Allegra (31 July 2017). "More official Pokémon Go events delayed following disastrous Fest". Polygon. Archived from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  47. ^ Cowley, Ric (30 November 2017). "Pokemon GO generates $16 million in tourism revenue for Japan's Tottori Prefecture in three days". pocketgamer.biz. Archived from the original on 10 July 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  48. ^ Jones, Gary (4 July 2018). "Pokemon Go news: New Japan event, Shiny Wingull and Squirtle Community Day reward". Express.co.uk. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  49. ^ Craddock, Ryan (8 May 2018). "Niantic Announces Pokémon GO Summer Tour 2018 For Europe, US And Asia". Nintendo Life. Archived from the original on 15 July 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  50. ^ Schaftnetr, Sandra (2 July 2018). "Pokémon locken 170.000 Spieler nach Dortmund". Ruhr24 (in German). Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  51. ^ a b Goldfarb, Andrew (29 August 2018). "Pokemon Go Took Over a City in Japan for a Massive Safari Zone". IGN. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  52. ^ "An Exciting Yokosuka Safari Zone Wraps Up Pokémon GO Summer Tour 2018!". Pokémon GO Live. Niantic Labs. 3 September 2018. Archived from the original on 6 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  53. ^ "今年燈會最大推手,他如何讓 50 萬遊客湧入嘉義抓寶?". TechNews.tw (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 9 October 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  54. ^ Knezevic, Kevin (16 February 2018). "Pokemon Go Lunar New Year Event Happening Right Now For A Limited Time". GameSpot. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  55. ^ Everington, Keoni (6 November 2018). "Taiwan hosts 2nd biggest Pokémon GO ever". Taiwan News. Archived from the original on 6 November 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  56. ^ Lopes, Fred (25 January 2019). "Pokémon Go Safari Zone devolve ares de Copa à Porto Alegre". Metro Jornal (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  57. ^ Hoffer, Christian (3 January 2019). "'Pokemon Go' Announces Brazil Safari Zone Event". Comic Book. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  58. ^ Chia, Rachel Genevieve (1 March 2019). "SEA's first Pokemon Go Safari Zone will be held in Sentosa – but you'll only get to play if you're lucky". Business Insider Singapore. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  59. ^ Chia, Rachel Genevieve (18 April 2019). "Here's what it's like inside Singapore's Pokemon Go Safari Zone – the first place in the world you can catch shiny Lapras and shiny Shuckle". Business Insider Singapore. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  60. ^ "An exciting Sentosa Safari Zone event wraps up!". Pokémon GO Live. Niantic Labs. 1 May 2019.
  61. ^ Locklear, Mallory (12 January 2018). "'Pokémon Go' Community Days bring exclusive captures every month". Engadget. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  62. ^ "Complete, Updated List of All Community Day events in Pokemon Go in 2018". Future Game Releases. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  63. ^ "Pokemon Go Complete, Updated List of all Community Day Events in 2019". Future Game Releases. 7 April 2019. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  64. ^ Barrett, Brian (6 July 2018). "The Quiet, Steady Dominance of Pokémon Go". Wired. Archived from the original on 6 February 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  65. ^ "Pokémon Go still has the power to bring people together". Eurogamer. 27 February 2018. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  66. ^ "'I just got a Larvitar:' Why throngs of Pokémon Go players are wandering trails, parks and city streets this weekend". GeekWire. 2 December 2018. Archived from the original on 3 December 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  67. ^ Frank, Allegra (4 May 2017). "Pokémon Go's first community event is a hint of the game's future". Polygon. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  68. ^ "Big Heritage and Pokémon GO team up in the ancient city of Chester". Niantic Labs. 6 July 2017. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  69. ^ "Chester transformed by Pokémon GO heritage festival". Place North West. 24 July 2017. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  70. ^ "Pokémon GO Park Events at Pikachu Outbreak". Pokémon GO. Niantic Labs. 8 August 2017. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  71. ^ Borkowski, Alex (10 August 2017). "'Pokémon Go' will live stream a big "Stadium" event from Japan — and fans are freaking out". Mic. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  72. ^ Hoffer, Christian (19 April 2018). "Pikachu Festival Passes on Pokemon Go Event Due to Safety Concerns". Comic Book. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  73. ^ "Pokemon Go in Downtown Akron | Events | Downtown Akron, OH". Downtown Akron Partnership. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  74. ^ "San Jose: Viva Calle goes 'Downtown and Eastbound'". The Mercury News. 17 September 2017. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  75. ^ "Pokémon GO is Back!". Viva Calle San Jose. 24 July 2018. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  76. ^ Slabbers, Bastiaan (28 October 2017). "In second year, Philly Free Streets route was car-free from Old City to North Philly". WHYY. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  77. ^ Kacurov, Dejan (30 November 2017). "Pokemon Go CicLAvia event in Los Angeles on December 10, It's Free to Participate". Future Game Releases. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  78. ^ Jeffery, Maxwell (26 October 2017). "Pokemon GO Announces a New Event". Game Rant. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  79. ^ "Pokémon GO Week in Korea!". Pokémon GO. Niantic Labs. 14 September 2018. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  80. ^ Webster, Andrew (4 April 2018). "Pokémon Go will reward players for picking up trash on Earth Day". The Verge. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  81. ^ "Earth Day Cleanup". Pokémon GO. Niantic Labs. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.

External links[edit]