Political drama

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A political drama can describe a play, film or TV program that has a political component, whether reflecting the author's political opinion, or describing a politician or series of political events.

Dramatists who have written political dramas include Aaron Sorkin[1][2], Robert Penn Warren, Sergei Eisenstein, Bertolt Brecht, Jean-Paul Sartre, Caryl Churchill, and Federico García Lorca.

Television[edit]

Television series that have been classified as political dramas include The West Wing, Borgen, Boss, Jack and Bobby, The Bold Ones: The Senator, Commander in Chief, House of Cards (UK and US versions), Madam Secretary and Designated Survivor.

The Good Wife can also be considered a political drama, especially in its critically acclaimed second season and fifth season. Races for political office, including state's attorney, governor, and even a Presidential run, move in and out of the show's narrative and the story of its main character, Alicia Florrick. However, Alicia's primary profession as a litigator for the most part takes precedence in the narrative, and so the show more often focuses on her cases and related office politics, making it primarily a legal drama.[citation needed]

Film[edit]

There have been notables films that have been labeled as political dramas such as Thirteen Days. A famous literary political drama which later made the transition to film was Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Aaron Sorkin". IMDb. Retrieved 2017-07-04. 
  2. ^ "The Dramatist: How Aaron Sorkin Made Politics Entertaining". TVGuide.com. 2009-12-07. Retrieved 2017-07-04.