Politika

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Политика
Politika
Politika
Serpol7nd.jpg
Type Daily newspaper
Format Berliner
Owner(s) Politika AD (50%)
East Media Group (50%)
Founder(s) Vladislav F. Ribnikar
Publisher Politika novine i magazini d.o.o.
Editor Žarko Rakić
Founded 25 January 1904; 113 years ago (1904-01-25)
Political alignment Centre to Centre-right
Language Serbian
Headquarters Trg Politika 1, Belgrade, Serbia
Circulation ~45,000 copies sold (2016)
ISSN 0350-4395
OCLC number 231040838
Website www.politika.rs

Politika (Serbian Cyrillic: Политика; English: Politics) is a Serbian daily newspaper, published in Belgrade. Founded in 1904[1] by Vladislav F. Ribnikar, it is the oldest daily newspaper still in circulation in the Balkans and is considered to be Serbia's newspaper of record.[2] Surprisingly, it was the only significant private newspaper in communist Yugoslavia. It was controlled by the Ribnikar family for 98 years, from 1904 to 2002.

Publishing and ownership[edit]

Politika is published by Politika novine i magazini (PNM), a joint venture between Politika AD and East Media Group.[3][4]

PNM also publishes:

History[edit]

Ever since its launch in January 1904, Politika was published daily, except for several periods:

  • Due to World War I, there were no issues from 14 November 1914 to 21 December 1914, and again from 23 September 1915 to 1 December 1919
  • Due to World War II, there were no issues from 6 April 1941 to 28 October 1944
  • In protest against government's intentions to turn Politika into a state-owned enterprise, a single issue was not published in the summer of 1992

The launch issue had only four pages and a circulation of 2,450 copies, and its record high circulation was the 25 December 1973 issue (634,000 copies).

Editorial history[edit]

  • Vladislav F. Ribnikar (1904-1915)
  • Miomir Milenović i Jovan Tanović (1915-1941)
  • Živorad Minović (1985-1991)
  • Aleksandar Prlja (1991-1994)
  • Boško Jakšić (1994)
  • Dragan Hadži Antić (1994-2000)
  • Vojin Partonić (2000-2001)
  • Milan Mišić (2001-2005)
  • Ljiljana Smajlović (2005-2008)
  • Radmilo Kljajić (2008)
  • Dragan Bujošević (2008-2013)
  • Ljiljana Smajlović (2013-2016)
  • Žarko Rakić (since 2016)

Controversies[edit]

In the run-up to and during the breakup of Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav wars, Politika was under the control of Slobodan Milošević and the League of Communists of Serbia and was used as an information guide to show the truth of what was happening to the Serbs in other republics, together with the Radio Television of Serbia. It blamed the local Kosovo Albanians for sodomizing Đorđe Martinović, and published fabricated reader letters claiming that the Albanians were "raping hundreds of Serbian women". Before and during the Croatian War of Independence, it published opinions on how "blood may shed again" in Croatia because of World War II, published claims on how the Vatican funded Croatia to break up Yugoslavia, etc. At the end of the Battle of Vukovar, it ran the fabricated story of the Vukovar children massacre.[5][6][7][8] The article was however retracted with a statement published the following day.[5]

In 1987, Politika published a controversial text known as Vojko i Savle.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Thomas (January 1999). Serbia Under Milošević: Politics in the 1990s. C. Hurst & Co. Publishers. p. 15. ISBN 978-1-85065-367-7. Retrieved 2 August 2015. 
  2. ^ "Grigorev Commentary in Politika: Serbs Vote is Pragmatic". The Bulletin Arcadia University. 1 February 2011. Retrieved 9 March 2014. ... wrote a commentary in the Jan. 26 issue of Politika, the Serbian newspaper of record and the oldest daily in the Balkans. 
  3. ^ "Germany's WAZ in surprise sale of stake in Serbian daily". B92. 2012-07-17. Retrieved 2012-07-30. 
  4. ^ "Daily Politika has new owner". Tanjug. 2012-07-18. Retrieved 2012-07-30. 
  5. ^ a b Renaud de la Brosse (2003-02-04). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a "State for all Serbs" - Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends - Part 1" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Retrieved 2012-04-16. 
  6. ^ Renaud de la Brosse (2003-02-04). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a "State for all Serbs" - Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends - Part 2" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Retrieved 2012-04-16. 
  7. ^ Renaud de la Brosse (2003-02-04). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a "State for all Serbs" - Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends - Part 3" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Retrieved 2012-04-16. 
  8. ^ Renaud de la Brosse (2003-02-04). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a "State for all Serbs" - Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends - Part 4" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Retrieved 2012-04-16. 

External links[edit]