Pop Goes the Weasel (3rd Bass song)

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This article is about the hip hop song "Pop Goes the Weasel" by 3rd Bass. For the nursery rhyme, see "Pop Goes the Weasel".
"Pop Goes the Weasel"
Single by 3rd Bass
from the album Derelicts of Dialect
Released 1991
Recorded 1991
Genre Hip hop
Label Def Jam/Columbia
Writer(s) Michael Berrin, John Dajani, Peter Gabriel, John Gamble, Peter Nash, Dante Ross, Stevie Wonder[1]
Producer(s) MC Serch, Pete Nice, DJ Richie Rich
Certification Gold (RIAA)
3rd Bass singles chronology
"Product of the Environment"
"Pop Goes the Weasel"
"Portrait of an Artist as a Hood"

"Pop Goes the Weasel" is the best-selling single from hip hop trio 3rd Bass; it appears on their third album, Derelicts of Dialect (1991).

Released a year after the ill-fated Cactus Revisited E.P., "Pop Goes the Weasel" instantly became a hit and soon went gold. The song helped the album reach gold status a month later. The song's message was similar to "Gas Face", voicing criticism towards the many mainstream commercial rap artists that had been gaining attention in the early 1990s (such as Vanilla Ice and MC Hammer).

The song features funk samples from the J.B.'s and Stevie Wonder as well as rock samples of The Who's "Eminence Front", and the foundation sample was from Peter Gabriel's #1 hit, "Sledgehammer". Production came from John Gamble, Geeby Dajani, and Dante Ross (noted for their groundbreaking work on Brand Nubian and Grand Puba's debut albums).

The music video featured Henry Rollins as Vanilla Ice.

The song was listed as #70 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of Hip Hop.

Vanilla Ice answered back with a song called "The Wrath" in 1992.

The song was referenced in the movie The Nutty Professor while Sherman Klump's family sat around eating dinner.


Chart (1991) Peak
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 29
U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Club Play 28
U.S. Billboard Hot R&B Singles 26
U.S. Billboard Hot Rap Tracks 1


  1. ^ "BMI Repertoire Search: Pop Goes the Weasel". BMI. Retrieved May 8, 2013. 

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