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==History==
 
==History==
Some musicologists trace the origins of pop music to 1679, when [[Alessandro Scarlatti]] composed his first opera, or even earlier, when [[Francesco Provenzale]] coined the musical language that Scarlatti popularized: light, lively and catchy.{{Fact|date=December 2008}} They placed the emphasis on arias, clearly separated from the "[[Recitative|recitativo]]", and grounded the arias on a strong sense of rhythm and melody. The song "Slide, Kelly, Slide", released by [[Edison Studios]] in 1894, is sometimes credited as the first "pop hit" record.{{Fact|date=December 2008}}
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Some musicologists trace the origins of pop music to 1679, when [[Alessandro Scarlatti]] composed his first opera, or even earlier, when [[Francesco Provenzale]] coined the musical language that Scarlatti popularized: light, lively and catchy.{{Fact|date=December 2008}} They placed the emphasis on arias, clearly separated from the "[[Recitative|recitativo]]", and grounded the arias on a strong sense of rhythm and melody. The song "Slide, Kelly, Slide", released by [[Edison Studios]] in 1894, is sometimes credited as the first "pop hit" record.{{Fact|date=December 2008}}fucking jews
   
 
== References ==
 
== References ==

Revision as of 20:16, 8 May 2009

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Pop music is a music genre that features a noticeable rhythmic element, melodies and hooks, a mainstream style and a conventional structure.

The term "pop music" was first used in 1926 in the sense of "having popular appeal" (see popular music) as a lighter alternate for rock and roll, but is a refreance of still having a popular appeal.[1][2]

Style

The standard format of pop music is the song, customarily less than five minutes in duration, with instrumentation that can range from an orchestra to a lone singer. Pop songs are generally marked by a consistent and noticeable rhythmic element, a mainstream style and traditional structure. Common variants are the verse-chorus form and the thirty-two-bar form, with a focus on melodies and catchy hooks, and a chorus that contrasts melodically, rhythmically and harmonically with the verse.

History

Some musicologists trace the origins of pop music to 1679, when Alessandro Scarlatti composed his first opera, or even earlier, when Francesco Provenzale coined the musical language that Scarlatti popularized: light, lively and catchy.[citation needed] They placed the emphasis on arias, clearly separated from the "recitativo", and grounded the arias on a strong sense of rhythm and melody. The song "Slide, Kelly, Slide", released by Edison Studios in 1894, is sometimes credited as the first "pop hit" record.[citation needed]fucking jews

References

  1. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary: pop" (html). Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  2. ^ "Allmusic genres: pop" (html). Retrieved 2007-12-01. 

Bibliography

  • Adorno, Theodor W (1942) "On Popular Music". Institute of Social Research.
  • Bell, John L. The Singing Thing: A Case for Congregational Song. GIA Publications, 2000. ISBN 1579991009
  • Billboard Genre Index
  • Frith, Simon; Will Straw; John Street (eds). The Cambridge Companion to Pop and Rock. Cambridge University Press, 2001. ISBN 0521556600
  • Johnson, Julian. Who Needs Classical Music?: Cultural Choice and Musical Value. Oxford University Press, 2002. ISBN 0195146816
  • Pleasants, Henry (1969) "Serious Music and All That Jazz". Simon & Schuster.
  • Roxon, Lillian (1969) "Rock Encyclopedia". Grosset & Dunlap.
  • Gillet, Charlie (1970) "The Sound of the City. The Rise of Rock and Roll." Outerbridge & Dienstfrey.
  • Middleton, Richard (1990) "Studying Popular Music". Open University Press.
  • Bindas, Kenneth J (1992) "America's Musical Pulse: Popular Music in Twentieth-Century Society". Praeger.
  • Clarke, Donald (1995) "The Rise and Fall of Popular Music". St Martin's Press. http://www.musicweb.uk.net/RiseandFall/index.htm]
  • Lonergan, David F. Hit Records, 1950-1975. Scarecrow Press, 2004. ISBN 0-8108-5129-6
  • Negus, Keith. Music Genres and Corporate Cultures Routledge, 1999. ISBN 041517399X
  • Maultsby, Portia K (1996) "Intra- and International Identities in American Popular Music." Trading Culture.
  • Official UK Charts Company information pack
  • Dolfsma, Wilfred (1999) "Valuing Pop Music: Institutions, Values and Economics". Eburon.
  • Shuker, Roy. Popular Music: The Key Concepts. Routledge, (2 edition) 2002. ISBN 0415284252
  • Starr, Larry & Waterman, Christopher (2002) "American Popular Music: From Minstrelsy to MTV". Oxford University Press.
  • Frith, Simon (2004) "Popular Music: Critical Concepts in Media and Cultural Studies". Routledge.
  • Dolfsma, Wilfred. (2004) "Institutional Economics and the Formation of Preferences: The Advent of Pop Music". Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Watkins, s. Craig. Hip Hop Matters: Politics, Pop Culture, and the Struggle for the Struggle for the Soul of a Movement. Beacon Press, 2005. ISBN 0807009822

See also

i don't like pop. rock 4 lyf

External links

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