Port Hardy

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Port Hardy
District municipality
District of Port Hardy[1]
Harbour of Port Hardy
Harbour of Port Hardy
Port Hardy is located in British Columbia
Port Hardy
Port Hardy
Coordinates: 50°43′21″N 127°29′34″W / 50.72250°N 127.49278°W / 50.72250; -127.49278Coordinates: 50°43′21″N 127°29′34″W / 50.72250°N 127.49278°W / 50.72250; -127.49278
Country  Canada
Province  British Columbia
Region North-Island
Regional District Mount Waddington
Founded 1966
Government
 • Mayor Hank Bood [2]
Area
 • Total 38.73 km2 (14.95 sq mi)
Elevation 23 m (75 ft)
Population (2016)
 • Total 4,132
 • Density 110/km2 (280/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC−8)
Postal code V0N
Area code(s) 250, 778
Climate Cfb
Website http://porthardy.ca/

Port Hardy is a district municipality in British Columbia, Canada located on the northeastern end of Vancouver Island.[3] Port Hardy has a population of 4,132 at last census (2016). It is the gateway to Cape Scott Provincial Park, the North Coast Trail and the BC Marine Trail, located on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. The community has access to spectacular wilderness adventures, such as kayaking, caving, world-class scuba diving, nature viewing, surfing, unique saltwater rapids,[4] fishing and camping.

Port Hardy's twin city is Numata, Japan.

Naming[edit]

Port Hardy was named after Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy who served as the captain of H.M.S. Victory.[3]

Filomi Days[edit]

Once a year, Port Hardy holds a celebration in Rotary Park to acknowledge its natural resource based economy. The three syllables, fi, lo and mi, stand for "fishing, logging and mining". The celebration includes festivities in the park such as activities for children, fundraising concessions, entertainment, beer gardens, bake sales, craft sales, and fireworks. A dance for each age group and a parade are also held on Filomi Days weekend- typically the third weekend in July.

Tourism[edit]

Port Hardy's economy relies greatly on tourism. Ferries to Prince Rupert, another popular tourist destination in British Columbia, depart every other day during peak season. Tourist traffic in the summer is immense, and hotels and restaurants usually find themselves stretched thin, but eager to accommodate all summer travelers.[citation needed]

Wildlife[edit]

A deer near the Quatse river

Deer, black bears, bald eagles, squirrels, seals, stellar sea lions, salmon and many other species of birds and mammals are often spotted along the Quatse Loop Nature Trail or at Storey's Beach which is a short drive from town. Humpback whales can occasionally been seen surfacing in the bay. Since early 2017, one or more elusive Cougars have been plaguing the community. As Northern Vancouver Island has the largest concentration of Cougars in the world, this latest cat increase is not surprising.

A local Facebook site, North Island Wildlife Awareness, has provided a vessel for the multitude of cougar sightings, and missing pet reports. Perhaps the most widely viewed sighting, was a video clip played nationwide by the evening news, a mature Cougar casually laying on a bench in the sunshine, looking through a window, ... the bench was in the courtyard of the Port Hardy Hospital, where the elderly or long term patients could step outside, some to smoke, but most just to be outdoors. No patients were eaten, the cougar strolled away. But a compelling example of how close to nature the rural communities of B.C. truly are. It should be noted that cougars are extremely shy, wary creatures, and any interaction with humans is very rare. The best method to avoid an unpleasant encounter with any of these large beasts, while hiking the beautiful North Vancouver Island terrain, is to make plenty of noise as you travel. Generally the huge predatory animals in B.C. would rather get out of your way if they hear you coming. Conversely, some animals can get very cranky by being surprised... Wolves generally want no part of humans, they are extremely intelligent and very aware of their surroundings, they pose no threat to a visitor and will have politely moved out of the path, prior to arrival. Black bears also have little interest in being aggressive, the exception of course is getting between a mother bear and her cubs. But that's common sense. Make lots of noise, she'll move her cubs out of the way before you get there. Grizzly bears are a bit of a different creature. They mostly want to get out of the way if you give them enough noisy warning. But don't count on it... Grizzly bears can not only be very aggressive, but are very predatory at times. There are a multitude of documented photographs of how a Grizzly has dug a shallow relief in the center of a game trail, just deep enough to lay in and wait ...

I've wollaped dozens of Grizzlies on the forehead with a well thrown egg size rock, and at that point they're happy to leave.

Cougars on the other hand, if they are attacking you, it's not because they're protecting their cubs, or their territory. Or they were surprised, or they felt threatened, or you walked into their territory. A Cougar will only attack you when it views you as prey. Not a threat that can be scared off, but as prey. Prey, as in it wants to kill and eat you, nothing more. Therefore, if you encounter a cougar, never run. Do your best to look big and intimidating. If attacked, never play dead, fight for your life. If your partner is attacked, never run away for help, join the fight with rocks or whatever. The Cougar is only looking for a prey to eat, convince him that you're too much trouble to try and kill. Nearly 60 years old, fourth generation in port hardy,... lol

Climate[edit]

Port Hardy has an oceanic climate (Köppen Cfb) due to its proximity to the Pacific moderating influence. As a result summers are very cool for the latitude, whereas winters instead are very mild. Although there is a strong drying trend in summer, its summer rainfall is still higher than those of the southerly mediterranean climates. Winter rainfall is very high and in general Port Hardy is far wetter than Canada's interior.

Climate data for Port Hardy Airport
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high humidex 14.2 16.8 19.5 22.9 35.3 31.9 30.6 32.8 28.0 25.4 18.8 15.7 35.3
Record high °C (°F) 13.7
(56.7)
16.7
(62.1)
19.8
(67.6)
23.3
(73.9)
33.4
(92.1)
31.7
(89.1)
26.7
(80.1)
28.7
(83.7)
25.8
(78.4)
25.6
(78.1)
18.9
(66)
14.8
(58.6)
33.4
(92.1)
Average high °C (°F) 6.5
(43.7)
7.3
(45.1)
8.9
(48)
11.2
(52.2)
13.9
(57)
15.9
(60.6)
17.8
(64)
18.1
(64.6)
15.8
(60.4)
11.8
(53.2)
8.1
(46.6)
6.0
(42.8)
11.8
(53.2)
Daily mean °C (°F) 4.2
(39.6)
4.4
(39.9)
5.5
(41.9)
7.3
(45.1)
10.1
(50.2)
12.3
(54.1)
14.3
(57.7)
14.4
(57.9)
12.2
(54)
8.8
(47.8)
5.5
(41.9)
3.7
(38.7)
8.6
(47.5)
Average low °C (°F) 1.8
(35.2)
1.4
(34.5)
2.0
(35.6)
3.4
(38.1)
6.1
(43)
8.7
(47.7)
10.7
(51.3)
10.7
(51.3)
8.5
(47.3)
5.7
(42.3)
3.0
(37.4)
1.3
(34.3)
5.3
(41.5)
Record low °C (°F) −14.4
(6.1)
−11.8
(10.8)
−12.8
(9)
−3.3
(26.1)
−1.1
(30)
1.7
(35.1)
2.8
(37)
3.3
(37.9)
−9.9
(14.2)
−5.4
(22.3)
−12.5
(9.5)
−12.2
(10)
−14.4
(6.1)
Record low wind chill −19.8 −23.5 −15.3 −6.9 −4.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 −0.6 −7.7 −20.8 −22.0 −23.5
Average precipitation mm (inches) 247.0
(9.724)
160.2
(6.307)
159.7
(6.287)
125.0
(4.921)
79.3
(3.122)
80.7
(3.177)
53.7
(2.114)
73.1
(2.878)
109.6
(4.315)
256.7
(10.106)
311.7
(12.272)
250.9
(9.878)
1,907.6
(75.102)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 235.0
(9.252)
151.9
(5.98)
154.8
(6.094)
123.5
(4.862)
79.2
(3.118)
80.7
(3.177)
53.7
(2.114)
73.1
(2.878)
109.6
(4.315)
256.5
(10.098)
307.9
(12.122)
239.9
(9.445)
1,865.7
(73.453)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 12.4
(4.88)
8.8
(3.46)
4.9
(1.93)
1.5
(0.59)
0.1
(0.04)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.1
(0.04)
3.9
(1.54)
10.8
(4.25)
42.7
(16.81)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 22.6 18.0 21.1 18.9 16.3 15.7 11.2 11.9 14.5 21.8 23.3 21.6 216.9
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 21.5 17.2 20.8 18.9 16.3 15.7 11.2 11.9 14.5 21.8 22.7 20.6 213.0
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 3.5 2.5 2.0 1.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 1.6 3.7 14.6
Average relative humidity (%) (at 3pm) 81.8 76.6 72.9 70.0 69.6 72.2 72.6 74.8 77.8 81.1 82.5 82.6 76.2
Mean monthly sunshine hours 51.4 73.9 114.2 143.2 174.7 165.8 201.8 189.2 150.0 95.5 56.3 46.3 1,462.4
Percent possible sunshine 19.5 26.2 31.1 34.6 36.4 33.7 40.7 42.0 39.5 28.7 20.8 18.5 31.0
Source: [5]

Radio[edit]

CFNI - 1240 Coast AM

Transportation[edit]

Port Hardy is served by Port Hardy Airport and the Bear Cove Ferry Terminal. There are two taxi companies and a public transport bus.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "British Columbia Regional Districts, Municipalities, Corporate Name, Date of Incorporation and Postal Address" (XLS). British Columbia Ministry of Communities, Sport and Cultural Development. Retrieved November 2, 2014. 
  2. ^ "District of Port Hardy Council Members". 
  3. ^ a b "Port Hardy". BC Geographical Names. 
  4. ^ "Nakwakto Rapids". Retrieved 29 March 2016. 
  5. ^ "Canadian Climate Normals 1981-2010 Station Data - Climate - Environment Canada". Environment Canada. Retrieved February 16, 2017.