Port Moody—Coquitlam

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Port Moody—Coquitlam
British Columbia electoral district
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Fin Donnelly
New Democratic
District created2013
First contested2015
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)108,326
Electors (2015)77,368
Area (km²)101
Pop. density (per km²)1,072.5
Census divisionsGreater Vancouver
Census subdivisionsAnmore, Belcarra, Coquitlam, Coquitlam 1, Greater Vancouver A, Port Moody

Port Moody—Coquitlam (formerly known as Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam) is a federal electoral district in British Columbia, Canada, that was represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1997 to 2004 and since 2015.

Geography[edit]

It initially consisted of:

In 1996, it was redefined to consist of the part of Greater Vancouver Regional District lying north and east of a line drawn from the intersection of the northern limit of Greater Vancouver Regional District with the Indian River; south along the Indian River and Indian Arm to the limit of the City of Burnaby, east and south along the northern and eastern limits of Burnaby, east along the southern limit of the City of Port Moody, south along Gatensbury Road, east along Foster Avenue, south along Hillcrest Street, east along Austin Avenue, south along Mundy Street, east along the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway No. 1); thence easterly along the Trans-Canada Highway, south along Leeder Avenue, east along the southern limit of the cities of Coquitlam and Port Coquitlam to the eastern limit of the GRVD.

History[edit]

This riding was created in 1987 as "Port Moody—Coquitlam" from parts of Mission—Port Moody and New Westminster—Coquitlam ridings.

The name of the district was changed in 1998 to "Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam".

In 2003, the district was abolished. A small portion was given to New Westminster—Coquitlam while the remainder was moved into the new Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam riding.

The 2012 electoral redistribution saw this riding resurrected for the 2015 election, taking in territories currently in New Westminster—Coquitlam and Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam.

Demographics[edit]

Ethnic groups in Port Moody Coquitlam (2016)
Source: [1]
Population %
Ethnic group European 65,510 59.7%
Chinese 15,090 13.7%
Korean 6,815 6.2%
South Asian 4,675 4.3%
Filipino 4,035 3.7%
West Asian 3,640 3.3%
Aboriginal 3,630 3.3%
Latin American 1,715 1.6%
Japanese 1,360 1.2%
Southeast Asian 1,280 1.2%
Black 1,250 1.1%
Arab 770 0.7%
Multiple minorities 1,510 1.4%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 375 0.3%
Total population 109,785 100%

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Port Moody—Coquitlam
Riding created from Mission—Port Moody
and New Westminster—Coquitlam
34th  1988–1993     Ian Waddell New Democratic
35th  1993–1997     Sharon Hayes Reform
36th  1997–1997
 1998–2000     Lou Sekora Liberal
Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam
37th  2000–2004     James Moore Alliance
Riding dissolved into Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
and New Westminster—Coquitlam
Port Moody—Coquitlam
Riding re-created from New Westminster—Coquitlam and
Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
42nd  2015–present     Fin Donnelly New Democratic

Election results[edit]

Port Moody—Coquitlam, 2015–present[edit]

2019 Canadian federal election
The 2019 general election will be held on October 21.
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Sara Badiei
People's Jayson Chabot
Conservative Nelly Shin
Marxist–Leninist Roland Verrier
Green Bryce Watts
New Democratic Bonita Zarrillo
Total valid votes/Expense limit 100.0  
Total rejected ballots
Turnout
Eligible voters
Source: Elections Canada[1]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
New Democratic Fin Donnelly 19,706 36.05 -4.41 $108,104.25
Liberal Jessie Adcock 16,888 30.89 +22.36 $46,085.20
Conservative Tim Laidler 16,112 29.47 -17.02 $143,435.34
Green Marcus Madsen 1,878 3.44 -0.82 $7,735.81
Marxist–Leninist Roland Verrier 83 0.15
Total valid votes/Expense limit 54,667 100.00   $212,494.90
Total rejected ballots 174 0.32
Turnout 54,841 69.69
Eligible voters 78,693
New Democratic notional gain from Conservative Swing +6.31
Source: Elections Canada[2][3]
2011 federal election redistributed results[4]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 20,203 46.49
  New Democratic 17,580 40.45
  Liberal 3,706 8.53
  Green 1,849 4.25
  Others 120 0.28

Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, 2000–2004[edit]

2000 Canadian federal election: Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Alliance James Moore 28,631 49.68 +14.12 $59,661
Liberal Lou Sekora 16,937 29.39 -9.97 $71,922
New Democratic Jamie Arden 5,340 9.26 -7.72 $25,248
Progressive Conservative Joe Gluska 4,506 7.82 +3.00 $4,011
Green Dave King 839 1.45 -0.87
Marijuana Paul Geddes 818 1.41 $647
Canadian Action Will Arlow 452 0.78 +0.24 $2,886
Communist George Gidora 98 0.17 $189
Total valid votes 57,621 100.00  
Total rejected ballots 187 0.32
Turnout 57,808 63.37
Alliance gain from Liberal Swing +12.04
Change for the Canadian Alliance is based on the Reform Party.

Port Moody—Coquitlam, 1988–2000[edit]

Canadian federal by-election, 30 March 1998
On the resignation of Sharon Hayes, 1 October 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Lou Sekora 11,284 39.36 +9.87
Reform Jim Cunningham 10,195 35.56 -8.04
New Democratic John Keryluk 4,869 16.98 -2.72
Progressive Conservative Joe Gluska 1,381 4.82 -0.70
Green Dave Norman 666 2.32 +1.01
Canadian Action Will Arlow 156 0.54
Independent François Nantel 86 0.30
Independent True Grit Verrier 35 0.12
Total valid votes 28,672 100.0  
Liberal gain from Reform Swing +8.96
1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Reform Sharon Hayes 23,113 43.60 +9.63 $41,036
Liberal Kwangyul Peck 15,636 29.49 +1.76 $61,017
New Democratic Joy Langan 10,444 19.70 -1.50 $45,967
Progressive Conservative Joe Gluska 2,927 5.52 -7.29 $12,844
Green Debra Lynne Eilers 695 1.31 +0.76
Natural Law Roger Shapka 190 0.35 -0.21
Total valid votes 53,005 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 192 0.36
Turnout 53,197 66.47
Reform hold Swing +3.94
1993 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Reform Sharon Hayes 20,261 33.97 +30.97
Liberal Celso Boscariol 16,541 27.73 +12.27
New Democratic Ian Waddell 12,643 21.20 -23.02
Progressive Conservative Jim Allard 7,639 12.81 -23.36
National Mark Hemming 1,556 2.61
Natural Law William Robert Ayling 333 0.56
Green Geoffrey Berner 329 0.55 -0.13
Libertarian Paul A. Geddes 239 0.40 -0.07
Independent Cathie Sackville 64 0.11
Commonwealth of Canada Elizabeth Smith 44 0.07
Total valid votes 59,649 100.0  
Reform gain from New Democratic Swing +9.35
1988 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Ian Waddell 23,871 44.22
Progressive Conservative Mae E. Reid 19,528 36.17
Liberal Richard R. Popp 8,346 15.46
Reform Bligh Stockwell 1,617 3.00
Green William Roger Marshall 368 0.68
Libertarian Harry W. Bull 253 0.47
Total valid votes 53,983 100.0  
This riding was created from parts of Mission—Port Moody and New Westminster—Coquitlam, which elected a Progressive Conservative and a New Democrat, respectively, in the last election.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  2. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Port Moody—Coquitlam, 30 September 2015
  3. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates
  4. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections

External links[edit]