Portal:Atlantic Coast Conference

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The  ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE  Portal


ACC 
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The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. Founded in 1953 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the ACC sanctions competition in twenty-five sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its twelve member universities. It also operates an academic consortium known as the Atlantic Coast Conference Inter-institutional Academic Collaborative that helps to foster inter-institutional collaborations between its member's academic and research programs. In 2011, the conference announced it was adding Syracuse and Pittsburgh to expand to fourteen members beginning in the 2013 academic year. In 2012, the ACC announced it would add Notre Dame in all sports but football and hockey. Also in 2012, the University of Maryland's Board of Regents voted to withdraw from the ACC to join the Big Ten Conference. On November 28, 2012, the ACC's Council of Presidents voted unanimously to invite the University of Louisville as a full member, replacing Maryland.[1]

ACC football teams participate in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the higher of two levels of Division I college football. The ACC is considered one of the current six "power conferences," and the ACC football champion receives an automatic bid to one of the Bowl Championship Series games each season.


Selected member institution


Tech Tower
The Georgia Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Georgia Tech, Tech, or GT) is a public research university in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States. It is a part of the University System of Georgia and has satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia; Metz, France; Athlone, Ireland; Shanghai, China; and Singapore.

The educational institution was founded in 1885 as the Georgia School of Technology as part of Reconstruction plans to build an industrial economy in the post-Civil War Southern United States. Initially, it offered only a degree in mechanical engineering. By 1901, its curriculum had expanded to include electrical, civil, and chemical engineering. In 1948, the school changed its name to reflect its evolution from a trade school to a larger and more capable technical institute and research university.

Today, Georgia Tech is organized into six colleges and contains about 31 departments/units, with a strong emphasis on science and technology. It is well recognized for its degree programs in engineering, computing, business administration, the sciences, architecture, and liberal arts. Tech is consistently ranked as one of the top 10 public universities in the nation and is a member of the Association of American Universities.

Georgia Tech's main campus occupies a large part of Midtown Atlanta, bordered by 10th Street to the north and by North Avenue to the south, placing it well in sight of the Atlanta skyline. In 1996, the campus was the site of the athletes' village and a venue for a number of athletic events for the 1996 Summer Olympics. The construction of the Olympic village, along with subsequent gentrification of the surrounding areas greatly enhanced the campus.

Selected athletic program


Carter-Finley Stadium
The NC State Wolfpack are the athletic teams representing North Carolina State University. They compete as a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level (Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) sub-level for football), primarily competing in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) for all sports since the 1953-54 season. Men's sports include baseball, basketball, cheerleading, cross country, football, golf, soccer, swimming & diving, tennis, track & field and wrestling; while women's sports include basketball, cheerleading, cross country, golf, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track & field and volleyball.

The athletic teams of the Wolfpack compete in 24 intercollegiate varsity sports. NC State is a founding member of the Atlantic Coast Conference and has won eight national championships: two NCAA championships, two AIAW championships, and four titles under other sanctioning bodies. Most NC State fans and athletes recognize the rivalry with the North Carolina Tar Heels as their biggest. Men's basketball has won ten ACC conference championships and two national championships. State's unexpected 1983 title was one of the most memorable in NCAA history.

NC State Wolfpack football, a member of the ACC, has won seven conference football championships and participated in 25 bowl games, of which the team has won thirteen.

The primary logo for NC State athletics is a red block 'S' with an inscribed 'N' and 'C'. The block S has been in use since 1890 but has seen many alterations through the years. The color red was adopted from the State bird the Cardinal. It became the sole logo for all NC State athletic teams in 2000 and was modernized to its current design in 2006.

NC State athletic teams are nicknamed the 'Wolfpack' (most women's teams are named the 'Lady Wolfpack'). The name was adopted in 1921 when a disgruntled fan described the behavior of the some of the school's football players as being "as unruly as a pack of wolves." Prior to the adoption of the current nickname, NC State athletic teams went by such names as the Aggies, the Techs, the Red Terrors, and Farmers. Since the 1960s the Wolfpack has been represented at athletic events by its mascots, Mr. and Mrs. Wuf. In print, the 'Strutting Wolf' is used and is known by the name 'Tuffy.' In September 2010, a purebred Tamaskan Dog became the new "Tuffy" Live Mascot.

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Sister portals/WikiProjects


2016–17 ACC Championships


Selected biography


Bobby Bowden
Robert Cleckler "Bobby" Bowden (born November 8, 1929) is a retired college football coach who holds the NCAA record for most career wins and bowl wins by a Division I FBS coach. He coached the Florida State Seminoles football team from the 1976 to 2009 seasons. During his time at Florida State, Bowden led FSU to an Associated Press and Coaches Poll National Title in 1993 and a BCS National Championship in 1999, as well as twelve Atlantic Coast Conference championships since FSU joined the conference in 1991. After a difficult 2009 season, Bowden announced his retirement from FSU on December 1, 2009, just weeks after his 80th birthday. His final coaching appearance was in the 2010 Gator Bowl game on January 1, 2010, which FSU won 33–21 over West Virginia. Bowden finished his career first in all-time wins by a Division I-FBS coach with 389 wins. The field at Florida State's Doak Campell Stadium was named after Bowden in 2004.

WikiProject


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Wikiproject ACC
An invitation to join us!

You are invited to participate in the ACC WikiProject, a WikiProject dedicated to developing and improving articles about, and related to, the Atlantic Coast Conference and its member institutions. Please see the WikiProject ACC page for more information.


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Associated Wikimedia


  1. ^ "ACC Extends Formal Invitation for Membership to the University of Louisville". Atlantic Coast Conference. Nov 28, 2012. Retrieved Nov 28, 2012.