Portal:Atlantic Coast Conference

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The  ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE  Portal


ACC 
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The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. Founded in 1953 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the ACC sanctions competition in twenty-five sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its twelve member universities. It also operates an academic consortium known as the Atlantic Coast Conference Inter-institutional Academic Collaborative that helps to foster inter-institutional collaborations between its member's academic and research programs. In 2011, the conference announced it was adding Syracuse and Pittsburgh to expand to fourteen members beginning in the 2013 academic year. In 2012, the ACC announced it would add Notre Dame in all sports but football and hockey. Also in 2012, the University of Maryland's Board of Regents voted to withdraw from the ACC to join the Big Ten Conference. On November 28, 2012, the ACC's Council of Presidents voted unanimously to invite the University of Louisville as a full member, replacing Maryland.[1]

ACC football teams participate in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the higher of two levels of Division I college football. The ACC is considered one of the current six "power conferences," and the ACC football champion receives an automatic bid to one of the Bowl Championship Series games each season.


Selected member institution


The Rotunda
The University of Virginia (often abbreviated as UVA, UVa, or Virginia) is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States. It was conceived and designed by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and established in 1819. UVA's initial Board of Visitors included former Presidents of the United States Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. The initial site of the University was farmland owned by Monroe, whose law office and farmhouse are now the site of Brown College at Monroe Hill, a residential college at UVA. UVA is the only university in the United States to be designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The 2013 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranks the University of Virginia as the 2nd best public university in the United States and the overall 24th best university in the nation.

Selected athletic program


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The Clemson Tigers are the athletic teams representing Clemson University. They compete as a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level (Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) sub-level for football), primarily competing in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) for all sports since the 1953-54 season. Men's sports include baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer, tennis and track & field; while women's sports include basketball, cross country, golf, rowing, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, track & field and volleyball.

In 1896, football coach Walter Riggs came to Clemson, then Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, from Auburn University. He had always admired the Princeton Tigers, and hence gave Clemson the Tiger mascot. The Clemson Tigers field seventeen athletic teams. In men's sports there are: football, basketball, baseball, soccer, tennis, golf, track and field (indoor and outdoor) and cross-country. For women's sports, there are: basketball, soccer, tennis, volleyball, track and field (indoor and outdoor), cross-country and rowing. The South Carolina Gamecocks are Clemson's in-state athletic rival. The two institutions compete against each other in many sports, but the annual football game receives the most attention. Clemson's main rivals within the Atlantic Coast Conference are Georgia Tech, NC State, Florida State, Miami, and Boston College.

The Tiger football program has won 59.1% of its games through the 2010 season, placing it 34th on the all-time winning percentage list. Clemson is also currently the leader among ACC schools for conference championships at 14, having last won a title in 2011. Clemson also won two Southern Conference titles before joining the ACC. The program has participated in 33 bowl games over the years, winning 16. The 1981 squad, led by Head Coach Danny Ford, became the first athletic team in school history to win a national championship. Clemson defeated Nebraska 22–15 in the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida to win the 1981 NCAA Football National Championship. Stars of the game included Homer Jordan (QB) and Perry Tuttle (WR). Clemson finished the year 12–0 and ranked #1 in the Associated Press and Coaches polls.

Some of the most notable coaching names in Clemson football history are John Heisman (also coached at Akron, Auburn, Georgia Tech, Penn, Washington & Jefferson, and Rice; the Heisman Trophy is named after him), Jess Neely, Frank Howard (whom the playing field at Death Valley is named after), and Danny Ford.

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Sister portals/WikiProjects


2016–17 ACC Championships


Selected biography


John Heisman
John William Heisman (October 23, 1869 – October 3, 1936) was an American player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Georgia Tech from 1904 to 1919 where he put together 16 consecutive non-losing seasons, including three undefeated campaigns and a 32-game undefeated streak. He lead Georgia Tech to a football national championship in 1917. At Tech, Heisman also coached basketball and baseball in addition to football. In a game played in Atlanta in 1916, Heisman's Georgia Tech squad defeated the Cumberland College Bulldogs, 222–0, in the most one-sided college football game ever played. Heisman's running up the score was supposedly motivated by revenge against Cumberland's baseball team for running up the score the previous year.

Also a Shakespearean actor off the field, Heisman was known for his use of polysyllabic language in coaching. After a divorce in 1919, Heisman left Atlanta to prevent any social embarrassment to his former wife. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954. The Heisman Trophy, awarded annually to the season's most outstanding college football player, is named after him.

WikiProject


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Wikiproject ACC
An invitation to join us!

You are invited to participate in the ACC WikiProject, a WikiProject dedicated to developing and improving articles about, and related to, the Atlantic Coast Conference and its member institutions. Please see the WikiProject ACC page for more information.


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Associated Wikimedia


  1. ^ "ACC Extends Formal Invitation for Membership to the University of Louisville". Atlantic Coast Conference. Nov 28, 2012. Retrieved Nov 28, 2012.