Portal:Atlantic Coast Conference

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The  ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE  Portal


ACC 
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The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. Founded in 1953 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the ACC sanctions competition in twenty-five sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its twelve member universities. It also operates an academic consortium known as the Atlantic Coast Conference Inter-institutional Academic Collaborative that helps to foster inter-institutional collaborations between its member's academic and research programs. In 2011, the conference announced it was adding Syracuse and Pittsburgh to expand to fourteen members beginning in the 2013 academic year. In 2012, the ACC announced it would add Notre Dame in all sports but football and hockey. Also in 2012, the University of Maryland's Board of Regents voted to withdraw from the ACC to join the Big Ten Conference. On November 28, 2012, the ACC's Council of Presidents voted unanimously to invite the University of Louisville as a full member, replacing Maryland.[1]

ACC football teams participate in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the higher of two levels of Division I college football. The ACC is considered one of the current six "power conferences," and the ACC football champion receives an automatic bid to one of the Bowl Championship Series games each season.


Selected member institution


Tech Tower
The Georgia Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Georgia Tech, Tech, or GT) is a public research university in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States. It is a part of the University System of Georgia and has satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia; Metz, France; Athlone, Ireland; Shanghai, China; and Singapore.

The educational institution was founded in 1885 as the Georgia School of Technology as part of Reconstruction plans to build an industrial economy in the post-Civil War Southern United States. Initially, it offered only a degree in mechanical engineering. By 1901, its curriculum had expanded to include electrical, civil, and chemical engineering. In 1948, the school changed its name to reflect its evolution from a trade school to a larger and more capable technical institute and research university.

Today, Georgia Tech is organized into six colleges and contains about 31 departments/units, with a strong emphasis on science and technology. It is well recognized for its degree programs in engineering, computing, business administration, the sciences, architecture, and liberal arts. Tech is consistently ranked as one of the top 10 public universities in the nation and is a member of the Association of American Universities.

Georgia Tech's main campus occupies a large part of Midtown Atlanta, bordered by 10th Street to the north and by North Avenue to the south, placing it well in sight of the Atlanta skyline. In 1996, the campus was the site of the athletes' village and a venue for a number of athletic events for the 1996 Summer Olympics. The construction of the Olympic village, along with subsequent gentrification of the surrounding areas greatly enhanced the campus.

Selected athletic program


VT football
The Virginia Tech Hokies are the athletic teams officially representing Virginia Tech in college sports. The Hokies participate in the NCAA's Division I Atlantic Coast Conference in 19 varsity sports. Virginia Tech's men's sports are football, basketball, baseball, cross country, golf, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, and wrestling. Virginia Tech's women's sports are basketball, cross country, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field and volleyball. Although Virginia Tech is still seeking its first national title in a varsity sport, it has won a national championship in bass fishing, as well as individual track and field events.

The word "hokie" originated in the "Old Hokie" spirit yell created in 1896 by O.M. Stull for a contest which was held to select a new spirit yell when the college's name was changed from Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College to Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute and the original spirit yell, which referred to the old name, was no longer usable. Stull's yell won, and he received the $5 award. The official university school colors - Chicago Maroon and Burnt Orange - also were introduced in 1896. The colors were chosen by a committee because they made a "unique combination" not worn elsewhere at the time. The Hokie Bird is a turkey-like creature whose form has evolved from the original school mascot of the Fighting Gobbler. While the modern Hokie Bird still resembles a Fighting Gobbler, the word "Hokie" has all but replaced Fighting Gobbler in terms of colloquial use. The term originated from the Old Hokie spirit yell, in which there was no particular meaning indicated for the word.

They football team has more wins in team history than any other program in the ACC. Their home games are played at Lane Stadium, which seats over 65,000 fans and has been dubbed as the most exciting entrance in college football. Lane Stadium is considered to be one of the loudest stadiums in the country, being voted number one in ESPN's "Top 20 Scariest Places to Play". Also, it was recognized in 2005 by Rivals.com as having the best home-field advantage in the country. The Hokies currently have the third-longest bowl game streak in the country, having participated in the postseason every year since 1993. Only Florida State and Florida have longer current streaks. In program history, the Hokies have finished with a Top-10 ranking six times, won eight conference championships (one Southern Conference three Big East and four ACC), and played once for the national championship, losing to Florida State University 46–29 in the 2000 Sugar Bowl.

Virginia Tech's men's basketball team has seen a resurgence of fan support since the arrival of coach Seth Greenberg in 2003–04 and its entry into the ACC in 2004–05.

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Sister portals/WikiProjects


2014–15 ACC Championships


Selected biography


Mike Krzyzewski
Michael William "Mike" Krzyzewski (nicknamed "Coach K"; born February 13, 1947) is an American basketball coach and former player. Since 1980, he has served as the head men's basketball coach at Duke University. At Duke, Krzyzewski has led the Blue Devils to four NCAA Championships, 11 Final Fours, 12 Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) regular season titles, and 13 ACC Tournament championships. Krzyzewski is also the coach of the United States men's national basketball team, whom he led to two gold medals at the 2008 Summer Olympics and 2012 Summer Olympics. He was the head coach of the American team that won the gold medal at the 2010 FIBA World Championship. He was also an assistant coach on the 1992 "Dream Team". Krzyzewski has amassed a record 79 NCAA tournament victories, while averaging 25 wins per season. He was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame following the 2001 season. On November 15, 2011, Krzyzewski led Duke to a 74–69 victory over Michigan State at Madison Square Garden to become the winningest coach in NCAA Division I men's basketball history. Krzyzewski's 903rd victory surpassed the previous record of 902, held by his former coach, Bob Knight.

WikiProject


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Wikiproject ACC
An invitation to join us!

You are invited to participate in the ACC WikiProject, a WikiProject dedicated to developing and improving articles about, and related to, the Atlantic Coast Conference and its member institutions. Please see the WikiProject ACC page for more information.


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  1. ^ "ACC Extends Formal Invitation for Membership to the University of Louisville". Atlantic Coast Conference. Nov 28, 2012. Retrieved Nov 28, 2012.