Portal:Atlantic Coast Conference

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The  ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE  Portal


ACC 
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The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. Founded in 1953 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the ACC sanctions competition in twenty-five sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its twelve member universities. It also operates an academic consortium known as the Atlantic Coast Conference Inter-institutional Academic Collaborative that helps to foster inter-institutional collaborations between its member's academic and research programs. In 2011, the conference announced it was adding Syracuse and Pittsburgh to expand to fourteen members beginning in the 2013 academic year. In 2012, the ACC announced it would add Notre Dame in all sports but football and hockey. Also in 2012, the University of Maryland's Board of Regents voted to withdraw from the ACC to join the Big Ten Conference. On November 28, 2012, the ACC's Council of Presidents voted unanimously to invite the University of Louisville as a full member, replacing Maryland.[1]

ACC football teams participate in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the higher of two levels of Division I college football. The ACC is considered one of the current six "power conferences," and the ACC football champion receives an automatic bid to one of the Bowl Championship Series games each season.


Selected member institution


The Rotunda
The University of Virginia (often abbreviated as UVA, UVa, or Virginia) is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States. It was conceived and designed by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and established in 1819. UVA's initial Board of Visitors included former Presidents of the United States Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. The initial site of the University was farmland owned by Monroe, whose law office and farmhouse are now the site of Brown College at Monroe Hill, a residential college at UVA. UVA is the only university in the United States to be designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The 2013 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranks the University of Virginia as the 2nd best public university in the United States and the overall 24th best university in the nation.

Selected athletic program


Hurricane football
The Miami Hurricanes, of Coral Gables, Florida, (known informally as The U, UM or UMiami) are the varsity sports teams of the University of Miami. They compete in the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The university fields 15 athletic teams for 17 varsity sports. Men's teams compete in baseball, basketball, cross-country, diving, football, tennis, and track and field. Women's teams compete in basketball, cross-country, swimming and diving, golf, rowing, soccer, tennis, track and field, and volleyball. UM has approximately equal participation by male and female varsity athletes in these sports. In 2004, the school became a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Historically, the Hurricanes are one of the most predominant college football programs in the nation. They have won five Division I national football championships (1983, 1987, 1989, 1991, and 2001), and are currently ranked fourth on the list of all-time Associated Press National Poll Championships, behind Notre Dame, Oklahoma and Alabama.

As of 2011, UM has produced two Heisman Trophy winners, Vinny Testaverde (in 1986) and Gino Torretta (in 1992). Five former UM football players — Ted Hendricks, Michael Irvin, Jim Kelly, Cortez Kennedy and Jim Otto — have been voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame following their NFL careers. Two other former UM players, Ottis Anderson and Ray Lewis, have been named Super Bowl MVPs (for Super Bowl XXV and Super Bowl XXXV, respectively). Since the 2008 demolition of the Miami Orange Bowl, the team has played its home games at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens. As of the 2011 National Football League season, UM had the most players active in the NFL of any university in the nation, with 42.

UM baseball has won four national championships (1982, 1985, 1999 and 2001) and reached the College World Series 22 times in the 34 seasons since 1974. Five UM graduates are currently active on MLB teams.

Team colors are green, orange, and white. The school mascot is Sebastian the Ibis. The ibis was selected as the school's mascot because, according to university legend, it is the last animal to flee an approaching hurricane and the first to reappear after the storm, making it a symbol of leadership and courage. The school's athletics logo is a simple green and orange, color of an orange tree, letter "U." The school's marching band is the Band of the Hour.

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Sister portals/WikiProjects


2017–18 ACC Championships


Selected biography


Norm Sloan
Norman Sloan (June 25, 1926 – December 9, 2003), nicknamed "Stormin' Norman," was an American college basketball player and coach. Sloan played college basketball for North Carolina State University, where he played guard for coach Everett Case's NC State Wolfpack that won Southern Conference championships in 1947, 1948 and 1949. He also played quarterback for coach Beattie Feathers' NC State Wolfpack football team and was a member of the Wolfpack track and field team.

Sloan was named head basketball coach at NC State in 1966. His NC State Wolfpack teams won ACC Championships in 1970, 1973 and 1974. His 1973 Wolfpack team was undefeated (27–0), but missed that year's NCAA tournament due to questions about the recruiting of high school phenomenon David Thompson. A year later, he led the Wolfpack to a 30–1 record and the school's first NCAA national championship. En route, the Wolfpack defeated UCLA in the NCAA Final Four, ending UCLA and coach John Wooden's run of seven straight NCAA championships. Known for his garish red-and-white plaid sports coat, Sloan's overall win-loss record at NC State was 266–127 in fourteen seasons. He was selected the National Coach of the Year in 1973 by Basketball Weekly and again in 1974 by the USBWA and the Associated Press.

WikiProject


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Wikiproject ACC
An invitation to join us!

You are invited to participate in the ACC WikiProject, a WikiProject dedicated to developing and improving articles about, and related to, the Atlantic Coast Conference and its member institutions. Please see the WikiProject ACC page for more information.


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Associated Wikimedia


  1. ^ "ACC Extends Formal Invitation for Membership to the University of Louisville". Atlantic Coast Conference. Nov 28, 2012. Retrieved Nov 28, 2012.