Portal:American football

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American football portal

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American football, known as football in the United States, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players with an oval ball on a rectangular field 120 yards long and 53.3 yards wide with goalposts at either end. The team in possession of the ball (the offense) attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball. In order to continue their drive, the offense must advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field in a series of four downs. If they succeed, they receive a new set of four downs to continue their drive, but if they fail, they lose control of the ball to the opposing team.

The team that has scored the most points by the end of the game wins. The offense can score points by advancing the ball into the end zone (a touchdown) or by place or drop kicking the ball through the opponent's goalpost (a field goal), while the defense can score points by forcing an offensive turnover and advancing the ball into the offense's end zone or by tackling the ballcarrier in the offense's end zone (a safety).

American football evolved from early forms of rugby (particularly rugby union) and association football (soccer), with the first game played on November 6, 1869. Rule changes from 1880 on by Walter Camp included the snap, 11-a-side teams and downs; further rule changes legalized the forward pass and created the neutral zone along the width of the football.

Today, American football is the most popular sport in the United States, where the National Football League (NFL) is the most popular league. The league's championship, the Super Bowl, is among the most-watched club sporting events in the world. College football is also popular in the United States, with the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision as the top level competition.

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The National Football League (NFL) playoffs are a single-elimination tournament held after the end of the regular season to determine the NFL champion. Six teams from each of the league's two conferences qualify for the playoffs based on regular season records, and a tie-breaking procedure exists in the case of equal records. The tournament ends with the Super Bowl, the league's championship game, which matches the two conference champions.

NFL post-season history can be traced to the first NFL Championship Game in 1933, though in the early years, qualification for the game was based solely on regular season records. The first true NFL playoff began in 1967, when four teams qualified for the tournament. When the league merged with the American Football League in 1970, the playoffs expanded to eight teams. The playoffs were expanded to ten teams in 1978 and twelve teams in 1990.

The NFL is the only one out of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States to use a single-elimination tournament in all four rounds of its playoffs; Major League Baseball (not including their Wild Card Showdown postseason round), the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League all use a "best-of" format instead.


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Cleveland Browns Stadium
Credit: Chris Brown

Cleveland Browns Stadium is a football stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. Home of the Cleveland Browns National Football League franchise, it sits on 31 acres (13 ha) of land on the shores of Lake Erie and has a capacity of at least 73,200.

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Jim Thorpe
James Francis "Jim" Thorpe
B. May 28, 1888 – d. March 28, 1953

Jim Thorpe was an American athlete of both Native American and European ancestry. Considered one of the most versatile athletes of modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals for the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, played American football (collegiate and professional), and also played professional baseball and basketball. He lost his Olympic titles after it was found he was paid for playing two seasons of semi-professional baseball before competing in the Olympics, thus violating the amateurism rules. In 1983, 30 years after his death, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) restored his Olympic medals. Of Native American and European American ancestry, Thorpe grew up in the Sac and Fox nation in Oklahoma. He played as part of several All-American Indian teams throughout his career, and "barnstormed" as a professional basketball player with a team composed entirely of American Indians. He played professional sports until age 41, the end of his sports career coinciding with the start of the Great Depression. Thorpe struggled to earn a living after that, working several odd jobs. Thorpe suffered from alcoholism, and lived his last years in failing health and poverty.


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Calendar

Dec 2 Pac-12 Championship Game Stanford vs USC
Dec 3 Big 12 Championship Game TCU vs Oklahoma
ACC Championship Game Miami vs Clemson
American Championship Game Memphis vs UCF
Big Ten Championship Game Wisconsin vs Ohio State
SEC Championship Game Auburn vs Georgia
Mountain West Championship Game Fresno State vs Boise State
Dec 9 Army–Navy Game Army vs Navy
Dec 25 NFL on Christmas Day Pittsburgh Steelers vs Houston Texans
Oakland Raiders vs Philadelphia Eagles
Dec 28 Alamo Bowl #13 Stanford vs #15 TCU
Holiday Bowl #16 Michigan State vs #18 Washington State
Dec 29 Cotton Bowl Classic #8 USC vs #5 Ohio State
Dec 30 Fiesta Bowl #11 Washington vs #9 Penn State
Orange Bowl #10 Miami vs #6 Wisconsin
Jan 1 Peach Bowl #12 UCF vs #7 Auburn
Citrus Bowl #17 Notre Dame vs #14 LSU
Rose Bowl #3 Georgia vs #2 Oklahoma
Sugar Bowl #4 Alabama vs #1 Clemson
2017 season: NFLNCAA FBS (Bowl games)


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