Portal:Astronomy/Picture

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This is the directory of selected pictures for Portal:Astronomy. For the old (no longer functional) version of this page, see Portal:Astronomy/Picture/Old.

Purge

Layout

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Instructions

  • Use the template above. Fill out the Image, Text, Credit, and Link fields. You do not need to fill out the other two.
  • All selections must be a Featured Picture on English Wikipedia or Wikimedia Commons.
  • Use images that are roughly square shaped. If an image is too wide, it will wind up outside of its section on the Portal mainpage. If it is too tall, it will unbalance the columns.
  • When adding new items, remember to update the max= field on the Portal:Astronomy page.

Selections

Picture 1

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/1

Mimas Cassini.jpg
Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute

Mimas is a moon of Saturn. It was discovered in 1789 by William Herschel, after whom the large crater in the image is named. It is the twentieth-largest moon in the Solar System, and the smallest astronomical body that is known to be rounded in shape because of self-gravitation. This photograph of Mimas was taken by the unmanned spacecraft Cassini in 2010.

Picture 2

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/2

M82 HST ACS 2006-14-a-large web.jpg
Credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Messier 82, also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy, and M82, is the prototype starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The starburst galaxy is five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way, and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy's center. This mosaic image, taken by the Hubble Telescope, is the sharpest wide-angle view ever obtained of Messier 82.

Picture 3

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/3

Flaming Star Nebula
Credit: User:Hewholooks

IC 405, also Sharpless 229 (Sh2-229), Caldwell 31 and The Flaming Star Nebula, is an emission/reflection nebula and a Caldwell object in the constellation Auriga, surrounding the bluish star AE Aurigae. It shines at magnitude +6.0. The nebula is about 5 light-years across. This is a white light image of the Flaming Star Nebula showing the "smoke" of reflection nebula.

Picture 4

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/4

Artist's concept of the surface of Pluto's small satellite Hydra
Credit: NASA/ESA - G. Bacon (STScI)

Artist's concept of the surface of Pluto's small satellite Hydra. Pluto & Charon (right) & Nix (bright dot on left).

Picture 5

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/5

A large sunspot group
Credit: NASA

Sunspots are temporary phenomena on the surface of the Sun (the photosphere) that appear visibly as dark spots compared to surrounding regions. They are caused by intense magnetic activity, which inhibits convection, forming areas of reduced surface temperature. Although they are at temperatures of roughly 3,000–4,500 K (4,940–7,640 °F), the contrast with the surrounding material at about 5,780 K leaves them clearly visible as dark spots, as the intensity of a heated black body (closely approximated by the photosphere) is a function of T (temperature) to the fourth power.

Picture 6

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/6

Cassiopeia A
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Cassiopeia A (Cas A) is a supernova remnant in the constellation Cassiopeia and the brightest astronomical radio source in the sky, with a flux of 2720 Jy at 1 GHz. The supernova occurred approximately 11,000 light-years (3.4 kpc) away in the Milky Way.

Picture 7

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/7

Cassiopeia A
Credit: Digitized Sky Survey, ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator

Orion's Belt or The Belt of Orion is an asterism in the constellation Orion. It consists of the three bright stars: ζ Ori (Alnitak), ε Ori (Alnilam), and δ Ori

Picture 8

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/8

NGC 1300
Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA

NGC 1300 is a barred spiral galaxy about 61 million light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. The galaxy is about 110,000 light-years across; just slightly larger than our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

Picture 9

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/9

A color-composite image of the Pleiades from the Digitized Sky Survey
Credit: NASA/ESA/AURA/Caltech

In astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky.

Picture 10

Portal:Astronomy/Picture/10

A color-composite image of NGC 4565 by Ken Crwford
Credit: Ken Crawford

NGC 4565 (also known as the Needle Galaxy or Caldwell 38) is an edge-on spiral galaxy about 30 to 50 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. The 10th magnitude galaxy sits perpendicular to our own Milky Way galaxy and is almost directly above the North Galactic Pole. First spotted in 1785 by Sir William Herschel (1738–1822), this is one of the most famous examples of an edge-on spiral galaxy.