Portal:Atlantic Coast Conference

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The  ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE  Portal


ACC 
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The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. Founded in 1953 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the ACC sanctions competition in twenty-five sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its twelve member universities. It also operates an academic consortium known as the Atlantic Coast Conference Inter-institutional Academic Collaborative that helps to foster inter-institutional collaborations between its member's academic and research programs. In 2011, the conference announced it was adding Syracuse and Pittsburgh to expand to fourteen members beginning in the 2013 academic year. In 2012, the ACC announced it would add Notre Dame in all sports but football and hockey. Also in 2012, the University of Maryland's Board of Regents voted to withdraw from the ACC to join the Big Ten Conference. On November 28, 2012, the ACC's Council of Presidents voted unanimously to invite the University of Louisville as a full member, replacing Maryland.[1]

ACC football teams participate in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the higher of two levels of Division I college football. The ACC is considered one of the current six "power conferences," and the ACC football champion receives an automatic bid to one of the Bowl Championship Series games each season.


Selected member institution


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North Carolina State University at Raleigh (NCSU) is a public, coeducational, research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. Commonly known as N.C. State or simply 'State, the university is part of the University of North Carolina system and is a land, sea, and space grant institution. The university forms one of the corners of the Research Triangle together with Duke University in Durham and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The North Carolina General Assembly founded the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, now NC State, on March 7, 1887, as a land-grant college. Today, NC State has an enrollment of more than 34,000 students, making it the largest university in North Carolina. NC State has historical strengths in agriculture, life sciences, design, engineering and textiles and now offers 106 bachelor's degrees. The graduate school offers 104 master's degrees, 61 doctoral degrees, and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.

Selected athletic program


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The Wake Forest Demon Deacons are the various sports teams of Wake Forest University. Originally, Wake Forest's athletic teams were known as the Fighting Baptists, due to its association with the Baptist Convention (from which it later separated itself). However, in 1923, after a particularly impressive win against the Duke Blue Devils, a newspaper reporter wrote that the Deacons "fought like Demons", giving rise to the current team name, the "Demon Deacons".

Wake Forest has won a total of eight national championships in four different sports; four of these championships have come since 2002. Wake Forest is sometimes referred to as being a part of "Tobacco Road" or "The Big Four", terms that refer to the four North Carolina schools that compete heatedly against each other within the ACC; these include Duke University, North Carolina, and North Carolina State, as well as Wake Forest.

Wake Forest is generally regarded as a competitive program in men's basketball, frequently qualifying for the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship (20 times in the school's history). The men's basketball team has made 16 straight postseason appearances (through their NIT appearance in 2006), the longest such streak in the ACC. They reached the Final Four once, in 1962. The school's famous basketball alumni include Billy Packer, a guard on the 1962 Final Four team who became far more famous as a basketball broadcaster; "Muggsy" Bogues, the shortest player ever to play in the NBA; Randolph Childress, for his MVP performance in the 1995 ACC Tournament; Dallas Mavericks star Josh Howard; 2006 NBA Rookie of the Year Award winner and Los Angeles Clippers star Chris Paul; and two-time league MVP, three-time NBA Finals MVP and four-time NBA Champion, San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan. Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum is the home venue for the Demon Deacons basketball team.

Wake Forest's football team competes in the Atlantic Division of the ACC and plays its home football games at BB&T Field. It is the third-smallest school in FBS in terms of undergraduate enrollment (behind only Rice and Tulsa) and is by far the smallest school playing in a BCS conference. Since the start of the 21st century, the Deacons have been mostly competitive. Wake Forest was ranked in the Top 25 in the nation by the AP Poll during most of the 2006 season when it won the 2006 ACC Atlantic Division Title and the 2006 ACC Conference Championship by defeating Georgia Tech 9-6 on December 2 in the ACC Championship Game. The win sent Wake Forest to the Orange Bowl to play future ACC member Louisville. This made Wake Forest the smallest school to ever compete in the Bowl Championship Series. For his part in the record-setting season, coach Jim Grobe was unanimously selected ACC Coach of the Year, and handily won the AP Coach of the Year award several weeks later.

Wake Forest won the 1955 College World Series in baseball. Starting in 2009, they will be playing on Ernie Shore Field, in Winston-Salem, NC.

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2017–18 ACC Championships


Selected biography


Ralph Sampson
Ralph Lee Sampson, Jr. (born July 7, 1960) is a retired American basketball player. A 7-foot-4 phenom who played center for the University of Virginia, he led the Cavaliers to an NIT title in 1980, an NCAA Final Four appearance in 1981 and an NCAA elite 8 appearance in 1983. He earned three Naismith Awards as the National Player of the Year, only the second athlete to do so, and an unprecedented pair of Wooden Awards. As the overall No. 1 pick in the 1983 NBA draft, Sampson brought heavy expectations with him to the NBA where he won the NBA Rookie of the Year.

Sampson averaged 20.7 points and 10.9 rebounds for his first three seasons with the Houston Rockets before injuries began to take their toll. Three knee surgeries later he retired a four-time All-Star who had helped lead the Rockets to the 1986 NBA Finals during which he averaged 14.8 points on .438 shooting, 9.5 rebounds, and 3.3 assists per game in a six game series loss to the Boston Celtics.

In 2002, Sampson was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the fifty best players in ACC history, one of only three Virginia Cavaliers so honored. In 2011, Sampson was inducted into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame and in 2012 he was named a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

WikiProject


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An invitation to join us!

You are invited to participate in the ACC WikiProject, a WikiProject dedicated to developing and improving articles about, and related to, the Atlantic Coast Conference and its member institutions. Please see the WikiProject ACC page for more information.


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Associated Wikimedia


  1. ^ "ACC Extends Formal Invitation for Membership to the University of Louisville". Atlantic Coast Conference. Nov 28, 2012. Retrieved Nov 28, 2012.