Portal:Aviation/Anniversaries/July

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July 1

  • 2012 – A MAFFS-equipped Air Force Lockheed C-130H Hercules, assigned to the 145th Airlift Wing, North Carolina Air National Guard, crashed in southwest South Dakota while fighting White Draw Fire, killing four crew and seriously injuring two.
  • 2004 – Cassini – Huygens, flagship-class NASA-ESA-ASI spacecraft, enters into orbit around Saturn.
  • 2002America West Flight 556, an Airbus A319, is ordered back to the terminal at Miami before take-off after security screeners report that the pilots appear intoxicated; the pilots are eventually given prison sentences.
  • 2002 – In the Überlingen mid-air collision, Bashkirian Airlines Flight 2937, a Tupolev Tu-154 with 57 passengers and 14 crew members on board, collides with DHL Flight 611, a Boeing 757 cargo plane with 2 pilots on board near Lake Constance, Germany; all people on both planes perish.
  • 2000 – British Midland becomes the 15th airline to join the Star Alliance, the world's largest airline grouping.
  • 1998 – A MK.51 BAE Hawk, 'HW-324', c/n 312221, of the Finnish Air Force crashes into the forest near Luopioinen due to Engine failure. Both pilots ejected. One of the pilots sustained minor injuries.
  • 1997 – Launch: Space Shuttle Columbia STS-94 at 2:02:02 pm EDT. Mission highlights: Spacelab mission.
  • 1994 – Launch of Soyuz TM-19, Russian mission to the space station Mir.
  • 1993 – STS-57, Shuttle-Spacehab mission of Space Shuttle Endeavour, is back on earth
  • 1993 – Launch of Soyuz TM-17, Russian mission to the space station Mir.
  • 1989 – The crowd at the Paris air show is stunned when the Soviet Sukhoi Su27 performs its 'Cobra' manoeuvre. The Cobra sees the aircraft transfer from level flight to a vertical attitude and back to level flight with negligible changes in altitude.
  • 1988 – CAAC (Civil Aviation Administration of China), the Chinese state airline, changes its name to become Air China.
  • 1978 – Death of Kurt Arthur Benno Student, German WWI Flying ace, Luftwaffe general and commander of German Fallschirmjäger (Paratroopers) during WWII.
  • 1976 – The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution opens in Washington, D. C., United States, it is a center for research into the history and science of aviation and spaceflight, as well as planetary science and terrestrial geology and geophysics.
  • 1975 – First flight of the Valmet L-70 Vinka, a Finnish-designed piston-powered military basic trainer aircraft.
  • 1969 – Death of Will Hubbard, British WWI flying ace, who served in the RAAF in WWII.
  • 1965 – The U. S. Army combines the 11th Air Assault Division (Test) with the 2nd Infantry Division to form the first Cavalry Division (Airmobile), a unique division that includes three airborne-qualified battalions and several battalions of helicopters which are integral to its combat elements, allowing it to engage in helicopter assault operations.
  • 1965Continental Airlines Flight 12, a Boeing 707, runs off the end of the runway at Kansas City Downtown Airport, breaking into three pieces; all 66 on board survive.
  • 1961 – The Royal Air Force deploys Hawker Hunter combat aircraft to reinforce Kuwait, which is under threat from Iraq. Simultaneously it deploys Canberras and Valiant aircraft to Malta.
  • 1961 – The RAF deploys combat aircraft to reinforce Kuwait, which is under threat from Iraq.
  • 1957 – Death of August Heinrich Euler, German aviation pioneer and aircraft designer and holder of the first Germany Pilots license
  • 1955 – South Vietnam’s air force, the Vietnam Air Force, is established.
  • 1954 – Vought becomes an independent company for the first time since 1929, taking the name Chance Vought Incorporated.
  • 1954 – Second of 13 North American X-10s, GM-19308, c/n 2, on Navaho X-10 flight number 7, crashes and burns after 8 minutes of flight out of Edwards AFB, California, when a fire develops on board.
  • 1952 – No. 407 Squadron was reformed at Comox and equipped with Avro 683 Lancaster 10 MR aircraft.
  • 1952 – No. 434 Squadron was reformed at Uplands, Ottawa and equipped with North American Sabre fighters.
  • 1951 – Death of Maurizio Ramassotto, Early Italian aviator, and race car driver.
  • 1950 – The United States Air Force discontinues the Air Defense Command.
  • 1947 – The Philippine Air Force (PAF), air force of the Republic of the Philippines, is formed.
  • 1946 – The U. S. Navy establishes Experimental Squadron 3 (VX-3). Equipped with Piasecki HRP-1 Rescuer helicopters, it probably is the world’s first official all-helicopter squadron.
  • 1945 – (1-3) The U. S. Navy escort aircraft carriers USS Suwannee (CVE-27), USS Chenango (CVE-28), and USS Gilbert Islands (CVE-107) with Marine Air Group 2 embarked support Australian Army amphibious landings at Balikpapan, Borneo.
  • 1944Orenda Engines, Canadian aircraft engine manufacturer and parts supplier, is incorporated
  • 1943 – US Navy Consolidated PBY-5 Catalina, BuNo 04447, returning to NAS Pensacola, Florida, after anti-submarine patrol flight over the Gulf of Mexico, attempts ill-advised landing in a storm brought on by a passing weather front, hits swell, bounces twice and overturns in Pensacola Bay. Nose section breaks away right at the wing tower and sinks, taking with it U.S. Coast Guard Motor Machinists Mate Chief Dana W. Heckart, in the co-pilot's seat as a pilot trainee. Rest of crew, all U.S. Navy personnel, pilot Ltjg. John W. Nichols, Lt. Norman Bennett, Ens. Francis R. Young, AMM3c Van C. Hardin, AM3c William E. Mutch, AMM2c Robert H. Ovink, ASM3c Albert W. Smith, and ARM3c Ralph E. Stuckey, survive as rest of airframe floats. Hardin, Mutch, Ovink and Smith suffer minor injuries, rest of crew more seriously injured. A seaplane wrecking derrick (YSD) retrieves floating section the following day. Heckart's body never recovered. Investigation finds pilot Nichols at fault for trying to land in storm conditions.
  • 1943 – Municipal authorities in Hamburg, Germany, have logged 137 air attacks on the city and the deaths of 1,387 people and injuries to 4,496 in air raids since the beginning of World War II.
  • 1942 – The United States Army Air Forces establish the Air Transport Command, a centralized, strategic air transport service directed by the United States Department of War.
  • 1941 – No. 413 (Coastal) Squadron was formed in England.
  • 1933 – First flight of the Douglas DC-1, an American prototype and first model of the famous United States DC (Douglas Commercial) commercial transport aircraft series
  • 1933 – Start of the 2nd and ultimate air raid of Italo Balbo with 25 SIAI-Marchetti S.55X seaplanes (Air cruise of the decade) from Orbetello, Italy
  • 1931 – The first mail delivered by rocket in the United States is claimed by three Struthers, Ohio high school students led by philatelist, John Kiktavi. He sends mail from Struthers to Poland, Ohio.
  • 1929 – C. H. (“Punch”) Dickens was the first airman to reach any point on the western Canadian Arctic shore by air when he arrived at Aklavick, NWT 01 July 1929.
  • 1929 – Death of Wilmer Lower Stultz, American pioneering aviator, test pilot and raid pilot, killed in a crash during a test flight.
  • 1928 – The first aviation weather reports were sent through teletype from Washington, D. C. to stations in Cleveland, Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois.
  • 1927Richard Evelyn Byrd with crew (Balchen, Acosta, and Noville) with their Fokker F.VIIa/3m "America" arrive from Roosevelt Field East Garden City, New York over Paris. Cloud cover prevented a landing in Paris; they returned to the coast of Normandy, crash-landing near the beach at Ver-sur-Mer without fatalities
  • 1925 – The U. S. Air Mail Service begins overnight flights between New York and Chicago over the Allegheny Mountains.
  • 1920Belgium establishes the first internal air-service of any European colony with the Lara-Ligne Aérienne Roi Albert in Belgian Congo
  • 1918 – John Ingles Gilmour, Scottish WWI fighter ace, scores 5 on that single day.
  • 1916 – Roland Robert Tuck, British fighter ace during World War II was born.
  • 1916 – beginning of the Battle of the Somme. In the five months of the battle, the British lose 782 aircraft and 576 pilots but maintain air superiority over the battlefield.
  • 1915 – The United States Department of the Navy establishes an Office of Naval Aeronautics, the first formal recognition of naval aviation within the United States Navy bureaucracy.
  • 1915 – The French Navy seaplane carrier Pas-de-Calais is commissioned. She is the first paddle steamer to serve as an aviation vessel.
  • 1914 – The Naval Wing of the Royal Flying Corps is separated from the RFC and established it as a separate service, the Royal Naval Air Service, under the control of the Royal Navy.
  • 1914 – The United States Navy establishes its first air department, the Bureau of Aeronautics.
  • 1912Harriet Quimby, the first licensed female pilot in the United States, as part of an Air Show spectacular flew around the Boston Light. During the flight, her Berliot plane was caught in turbulent air and nose-dived, plummeting both Quimby and a meet organizer passenger to their deaths in Dorchester Bay.
  • 1911 – First US Navy airplane. Curtiss D Triad as Navy A-1, first flown by Lt T G Ellyson. This was followed by a Curtiss A-2 and Wright B-1.
  • 1893 – Birth of Mario de Bernardi, Italian WWI fighter pilot, seaplane air racer of the 1920s, and test pilot of early Italian experimental jets.
  • 1887 – Birth of Leighton Wilson Hazelhurst Jr., American aviation pioneer.
  • 1884 – Birth of René Caudron, French aviation pioneer and aircraft designer along with his brother Gaston.
  • 1872Louis Blériot, the pioneer aviator who made the world’s first airplane flight across the English Channel, is born in Cambrai, France. After experimenting first with gliders, he designed and built his own monoplane with a 25-hp engine, which took him across the channel.
  • 1862 – (1-2) The Confederate States Navy steamer Teaser operates a coal-gas silk observation balloon to reconnoitre Union Army positions along the James River in Virginia, the only use of a balloon by the Confederate States Navy. Her capture on July 4 by the steamer USS Maratanza ends Confederate naval balloon operations.

References[edit]

Edit today's anniversaries

July 2

  • 2009 – A Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado F.3 crashes near the Rest and Be Thankful beauty spot in Glen Kinglass, Arrochar, Scotland. The aircraft was on a routine training flight from No. 43 Squadron RAF Leuchars in Fife resulting in 2 crew killed in the accident. The crew were pilot Kenneth Thompson and weapons systems officer Nigel Morton.
  • 2007 – OH-58D Kiowa 91-0560 from 3–17 Cavalry Regiment is shot down along a canal south of Baghdad in Babil province with small arms, both pilots were rescued by strapping themselves onto the stub wings of an AH-64 Apache. Helicopter was later destroyed.[7][8]
  • 2005First Trans-Atlantic flight re-enactment: Steve Fossett and co-pilot Mark Rebholz recreated the Firstdirect crossing of the Atlantic by the British team of John Alcock and Arthur Whitten-Brown. Their flight from St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada to Clifden, Ireland in the open cockpit Vickers Vimy replica took 18 hours 25 min with 13 hours flown in instrument flight conditions. Because there was no airport in Clifden, Fossett and Rebholz landed on the 8th fairway of the Connemarra Golf Course.
  • 2005 – A CH-47D Chinook 85-24335 from C Company/159th Aviation Brigade destroyed in a fire on the ground at Ramadi Camp.[9]
  • 2004 – Cassini – Huygens makes its First distant flyby of Saturn's largest moon, Titan.
  • 2000 – Philippine Air Force General Santiago Madrid and Palawan Governor Salvador Socrates were among those killed when a Philippine air force Fokker 50 GAF Nomad N.22 C crashed into the sea off the western province of Palawan.
  • 1994US Airways Flight 1016, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9, crashes while attempting to land at Charlotte, North Carolina during a thunderstorm. 37 of the 51 people on board are killed.
  • 1992 – Braniff Airlines (Braniff III) goes out of business.
  • 1987Per Lindstrand and Richard Branson lift off their balloon 'Virgin Atlantic' (at the time, the largest ever flown at 2.3 million cubic feet of capacity) from Sugarloaf Mountain for the Firsttransatlantic flight in a hot air balloon.
  • 1985 – Launch of Giotto, European robotic spacecraft mission from the European Space Agency, intended to fly by and study Halley's Comet.
  • 1985 – Death of David Charles Purley, GM, British racing driver in the crash of his Pitts Special aerobatic biplane. Purley is perhaps best known for his actions at the 1973 Dutch Grand Prix, where he abandoned his own race and attempted to save the life of fellow British driver Roger Williamson, whose car was upside down on fire following a horrific accident.
  • 1984 – Entered Service: Mirage 2000 with Escadron de Chasse 1/2.
  • 1982 – Death of Tow Jewett, co-founder of the Quickie Aircraft Corporation, builder of the successful Quickie tandem-winged kitplane, Killed in the crash of the sole Quickie Aircraft Corporation Free Enterprise (Big Bird) prototype during a test flight.
  • 1982 – In the homemade Inspiration I, consisting of a patio chair attached to 45 eight-foot (2.4-m) helium-filled weather balloons, American truck driver Larry Walters lifts off from the back yard of a home in San Pedro, California, planning to drift at an altitude of about 30 feet (9.1 m) for a few hours before using a pellet gun to shoot out some balloons and descend gradually. Instead, Inspiration 1 quickly ascends to an altitude of 15,000 feet (4,572 m). After drifting into controlled airspace near Long Beach Airport, he uses the pellet gun to shoot out several of his balloons before accidentally dropping the pellet gun overboard. He gradually descends, becomes entangled in power lines, climbs down safely, and is arrested.
  • 1963Mohawk Airlines Flight 121, a Martin 4-0-4, crashes near Rochester, New York while attempting takeoff, killing seven of the 43 people on board.
  • 1960 – Textron Inc. purchases Bell Aircraft Corporation.
  • 1959 – First flight of the Kaman SH-2 Seasprite, American ship-based helicopter with anti-submarine, anti-surface threat capability, including over-the-horizon targeting.
  • 1959 – Birth of Wendy Barrien Lawrence, USN Captain, helicopter pilot, engineer, and NASA astronaut, First female graduate of the US Naval Academy to fly in space.
  • 1945 – 532 B-29 Superfortresses drop 3,709 tons (3,364,783 kg) of bombs on Kure, Kumamoto, and other cities in Japan.
  • 1945 – The Okinawa campaign is officially declared over with the complete defeat of Japanese forces there. During the campaign, the Allies have lost 32 ships and naval craft sunk and 368 damaged and over 4,900 naval personnel killed and 4,824 wounded. Most of the ships sunk were victims of kamikazes. The Allies also have lost 763 aircraft during the campaign.
  • 1943 – Lt Charles Hall, becomes First black pilot to shoot down Nazi plane.
  • 1943 – An airstrike on American forces on Rendova Island by 24 Japanese bombers escorted by 48 fighters achieves complete surprise, killing 55 and wounding 77.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) The Allied Northwest African Air Force begins heavy day-and-night attacks against Axis airfields in Sicily, Sardinia, and Italy in preparation for the upcoming invasion of Sicily. Italy claims to fly 650 fighter sorties and Germany 500 between July 1 and 9 in defending against the Allied bombing campaign, but almost all Axis airfields on Sicily are knocked out by the time of the invasion.
  • 1940 – Birth of Georgi Ivanov Kakalov, Bulgarian pilot, First Bulgarian cosmonaut and politician.
  • 1938 – A Heinkel He-116R, German 4 engine long-range mail plane, sets an endurance record, covering 9,942 km (6,178 mi) un-refueled, at an average speed of 214 km/h (133 mph) after a 48 hours 18 min flight.
  • 1937 – Russian pilot Paulina Osipenka sets a women non-stop flight record of 2416 km between Novgorod and Archangelsk with a Beriev MP-1bis, Variant of the Beriev MBR-2, Soviet reconnaissance flying boat.
  • 1934 – The Armée de l’Air is separated from the French Army to become the independent French Air Force, although retaining the name Armée de l’Air.
  • 1926 – Distinguish Flying Cross authorized.
  • 1919U.S. Navy blimp C-8 explodes while landing at Camp Holabird, Maryland, injuring ~80 adults and children who were watching it. Windows in homes a mile away are shattered by the blast.
  • 1919 – The British airship R34 begins the first airship crossing of the Atlantic Ocean and the first east-to-west Atlantic flight, leaving East Fortune, Scotland, to arrive in New York on July 6. The journey becomes a successful two-way crossing when the airship arrives back in the United Kingdom on July 13.
  • 1918 – Death of Percy Griffith Jones, Welsh WWI flying ace, killed in action in his Bristol F.2b.
  • 1918 – Death of Joseph Creuss Callaghan (the mad major), Irish/American WWI flying ace, killed in his Sopwith Dolphin.
  • 1916 – Birth of Hans-Ulrich Rudel, Famous German dive-bomber pilot and The most highly decorated German serviceman of WWII.
  • 1912 – Death of Chester Melvin Vaniman, American acrobatic photographer, adventurer, businessman, famous aviator and balloonist, killed when his airship, the 'Akron', exploded off the New Jersey shore during his 2nd attempt at a trans-Atlantic airship crossing.
  • 1910Claude Grahame-White, in his Farman biplane, won the £1,000 first prize for Aggregate Duration in Flight (1 hr 23 min 20 secs) at the Midlands Aviation Meeting at Wolverhampton
  • 1909 – The first Canadian-built powered heavier-than-air craft, the Baddeck No. 1, nearing completion, in Canada’s first aircraft factory.
  • 1899 – Birth of Cyril Richard Smythe, British WWI flying ace

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kids feared among 21 dead in Siberia copter crash", Russia Today, July 2, 2013
  2. ^ "Children die in air crash in Russia's Sakha Republic", BBC News, July 2, 2013
  3. ^ "Russian helicopter crash kills at least 19", Reuters, July 2, 2013
  4. ^ "23 die in Yakutia helicopter crash, 5 survive", ITAR-TASS, July 2, 2013
  5. ^ "Helicopter Crash in Siberia Kills at Least 19 - Officials", RIA Novosti, July 2, 2013
  6. ^ Schreck, Adam (3 July 2011). "NATO Boosts Airstrikes on Military Targets in Libya". The Boston Globe. Tripoli. Associated Press. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  7. ^ "Task Force Marne pilots rescued from downed helicopter". Official press release. 2007-07-03. Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  8. ^ "1991 USAF Serial Numbers". Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  9. ^ "Boeing's CH-47 Chinook 85-24335". Retrieved 2010-07-16. On 2 July 2005, 85-24335 was lost near Ramadi, Iraq, due to an accident. While conducting a cargo transport mission at night under night vision goggles, 85-24335 sat down in a landing zone near Ramadi. A sister ship came in with a sling load and hovered nearby. The rotor wash from the second Chinook loosened the stakes securing the pad to the ground and one or more pads lifted into the rotor system causing the subsequent destruction of 85-24335. Of the crew of five and two passengers, there were some minor injuries, but no personnel were killed. When lost, 85-24335 was 38.74 years old. 

Edit today's anniversaries

July 3

  • 2012 – Two UK Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado GR4s crashed in Moray Firth, Scotland.
  • 2009 – A Belgian Air Component Piper L-21B Super Cub crashes on take-off at Goetsenhoven Military Airfield, Flanders, Belgium killing the 2 crew. The aircraft which was used as a gilder-tug collided with a nearby hangar, crashing into a field and caught fire.
  • 2009 – A Fuerza Aérea Argentina Dassault Aviation Mirage III from Grupo 6 de Caza based at Tandil Airport, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina crashed into open countryside near Benito Juárez and the pilot successfully ejected from the aircraft.
  • 2002 – Steve Fossett completes round-the-world balloon flight, landing after 14 days, 19hrs. He broke three balloon records along the way; fastest time around the world (13 days, 3 mins), longest distance flown solo (20,483.25 mi; 32,963.35 km), and longest time flown solo (355 hrs, 50 min).
  • 2002 – Launch of The Comet Nucleus TOUR (CONTOUR), NASA Discovery-class space probe.
  • 2001Vladivostok Air Flight 352, a Tupolev Tu-154 belonging to Vladivostok Air crashed while attempting to land in Irkutsk, Russia, killing all 145 people aboard.
  • 2001 Hainan Island incident – More than 3 months after its emergency landing at Lingshui airbase in China, the US Navy EP3E Aries III is air freighted back to America on a chartered Russian Antonov An-124-100. The Chinese Government insist that a civilian aircraft be used to remove the aircraft.
  • 1998 – Launch of Nozomi (spacecraft), Japanese space probe designed to study the upper Martian atmosphere and its interaction with the solar wind and to develop technologies for use in future planetary missions.
  • 1988Iran Air Flight 655, an Airbus A300, is shot down over Iranian waters by the missile cruiser USS Vincennes; all 290 people on board are killed.
  • 1987 – 2 men, Per Lindstrand and Richard Branson, became First hot-air balloon travelers to cross Atlantic. Their balloon, at the time, is the largest ever flown at 2.3 million cubic feet of capacity.
  • 1982 – Death of William Ellsworth Kepner, US Army, US Army Air Corps, pioneer balloonist and airship pilot. WWII high-ranking officer, he flew some missions in Bombers and fighters.
  • 1982 – First flight of The prototype General Dynamics F-16XL, derivative of the F-16 Fighting Falcon, with a cranked arrow delta wing, similar in appearance to the wing planform of the earlier Saab 35 Draken from Sweden, that is over twice the size of that of the standard F-16 wing.
  • 1974 – Launch of Soyuz 14, Soviet manned spaceflight to the Salyut 3 space station
  • 1973 – Death of Laurens Hammond, American engineer and inventor (most famously, the Hammond organ, the Hammond Clock, and the world's First polyphonic musical synthesizer, the Novachord). In WWII he helped design guided missile controls and was awarded patents for infrared and light sensing devices for bomb guidance, glide bomb controls, a camera shutter and a new type of gyroscope.
  • 1971Toa Domestic Airlines Flight 533, a NAMC YS-11, hits Yokotsudake (Yokotsu Mountain) near Hakodate Airport, Hokkaidō, Japan, killing all 68 passengers and crew in the worst ever disaster involving the YS-11.
  • 1968 – In the 1968 BKS Air Transport Heathrow crash, an Airspeed Ambassador freight aircraft experiences metal fatigue and crashes while landing, striking two unoccupied British European Airways airliners. Six of the freighter's crew of eight are killed, as are eight racehorses being transported. All Airspeed Ambassadors are grounded until a redesign strengthens the flaps. One of the BEA aircraft is repaired but is lost in the 1972 Staines air disaster.
  • 1962 – No. 425 Squadron, the first RCAF Squadron to be equipped with McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo fighters, was moved to its permanent station at Bagotville, after re-equipping at Namao, AB.
  • 1951 – Female members of the Royal Canadian Air Force are the first military women to train with the post-war Canadian military when they enter the RCAF Manning Depot at St. Jean, Quebec.
  • 1951 – United States Navy Lieutenant junior grade John K. Koelsch and his crewman, Aviation Mate Third Class George M. Neal, are shot down in an HO3 S helicopter by enemy ground fire while trying to rescue United States Marine Corps Captain James V. Wilkins, who had been shot down behind enemy lines and was badly burned. Koelsch and Neal rig a litter to carry Wilkins out of the area, but eventually are captured on July 12, and Koelsch dies on October 16, 1951, while in captivity. For his actions, Koelsch posthumously becomes the first helicopter pilot to receive the Medal of Honor.
  • 1950 – F9 F Panther's of VF-51 flying from USS Valley Forge become the first US jet fighters to go into combat. A North Korean Yak-9 is shot down.
  • 1947 – The Philippine Air Force is formed.
  • 1943 – Birth of Norman Earl Thagard, American scientist and NASA astronaut. First American to ride to space on board a Russian vehicle, and can be considered the First American cosmonaut.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) 653 British bombers attack Cologne. During the raid, the Luftwaffe experiments for the first time with Wilde Sau (“Wild Boar”) night fighter tactics, in which single-engine day fighters use any illumination – From searchlights, flares, fires, etc., – Available over a city to visually identify and attack enemy bombers at night. Wilde Sau pilots and antiaircraft artillery both claim the same 12 bombers shot down over Cologne and officially each receive credited for six. The experiment’s success will lead to the formation of Jagdgeschwader 300, which will specialize in Wilde Sau operations.
  • 1942 – First airborne test firing of a retrocrocket at Goldstone Lake, Calif., from a PBY-5 A piloted by Lt. Comdr. J. H. Hean (USN).
  • 1941 – Luftwaffe ace Major Wilhelm Balthasar, (47 credited kills), Geschaderkommodore of Jagdgeschwader 2, and winner of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oakleaves, is killed in action on this date when his Messerschmitt Bf 109F-4 suffers failure of a wing and he crashes into Ferme Goset, Wittes, France, near Saint-Omer. The airframe is recovered in March 2004.
  • 1941 – Royal Air Force Boeing Fortress I, AN528, of 90 Squadron, RAF Polebrook, is destroyed when a troublesome engine catches fire during a late-night ground run.
  • 1941 – (overnight) – 90 British bombers attempting to attack the Krupp arms works and rail targets in Essen, Germany, scatter their bombs so widely that they bomb Bochum, Dortmund, Duisburg, Hagen, Wuppertal, and other cities as well as Essen. In Essen, they succeed only in inflicting minor housing damage, injuring two people.
  • 1940 – British bombers make a daylight attack against German barges assembling at Rotterdam in anticipation of an invasion of the United Kingdom, their first attack against German efforts to build an invasion force. Such raids will peak in September and end in October after the threat of a German invasion abates.
  • 1940 – During the British attack on the French fleet at Mers-el-Kébir, Algeria, Fairey Swordfish aircraft from the aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal mine the harbor and unsuccessfully attack the French battlecruiser Strasbourg as she flees to Toulon. French Curtiss Hawk 75 fighters and Blackburn Skua fighters from Ark Royal engage in a dogfight, during which the French shoot down one Skua.
  • 1937July 3-6Pan Am and Imperial Airways flying boats conduct joint survey flights over the Atlantic in preparation for the commencement of regular services.
  • 1937 – Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan disappear over the Pacific Ocean on a flight from Lae, New Guinea, to Howland Island, and are never seen again.
  • 1936 – First flight of the Short Empire S.23prototype RMA Canopus. The flying boat built by Shorts as the S.23 design, makes a brief 14-min. first flight piloted by John Lankester Parker.
  • 1933 – First flight of Tupolev ANT-16 (also known as TB-4) experimental Russian heavy bomber aircraft.
  • 1931 – First prototype Breguet 393 T (390 T), French 3 engine sesquiplane of all-metal construction airliner, loses a propeller during test flight, pilot losing his life when his parachute failed to open after he abandoned the aircraft.
  • 1921Zeppelin LZ120 'Bodensee' is transferred, renamed as Esperia, to Italy in the context of war reparations.
  • 1920 – The first Royal Air Force Pageant is held, at Hendon
  • 1919 – Designed and built by the Engineering Division of the U. S. Bureau of Aircraft Production, the first of four XB-1As (originally designated USXB-1 A) makes its first flight at McCook Field, Dayton, Ohio.
  • 1918 – Death of Wilhelm "Willi" Reinhard, German WWI fighter ace, killed while test flying a Zeppelin-Lindau D. I, when a strut broke and the top wing collapsed
  • 1886 – Birth of Giovanni 'Gianni' Battista Caproni, Italian aeronautical engineer, civil engineer, electrical engineer, and aircraft designer who founded the Caproni aircraft-manufacturing company.

References[edit]

Edit today's anniversaries

July 4

  • 2012 – The American deep-sea exploration vessel Nautilus discovers the wreckage of the Turkish Air Force F-4 Phantom II shot down on 22 June and the bodies of its two-man crew on the floor of the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of about 1,000 meters (3,281 feet). The Turkish armed forces announce that they have begun an effort to recover the bodies.[2]
  • 2011 – Missinippi Airways Cessna 208 crash: A pilot attempted to abort its take off from Pukatawagan Airport. The aircraft overran the runway and crashed into a ravine where it caught fire and was destroyed. One passenger was killed, the pilot and seven other passengers were injured and transported to hospital. None of those transported to hospital received life-threatening injuries.
  • 2007 – An OH-58 Kiowa 95-0002 crashes into power lines in Mosul, killing the pilot and injuring the copilot.[3]
  • 2006 – Launch: Space Shuttle Discovery STS-121 at 18:37:55 UTC. Mission highlights: ISS Flight ULF1.1: Supply, crew rotation, MPLM Leonardo.
  • 2005Deep Impact's impactor successfully collided with the 9P/Tempel 1 comet's nucleus.
  • 2002 – An Egyptian-American man, Hesham Mohamed Hadayet, opens fire on the El Al ticket counter at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, killing two Israelis and wounding four other people before an El Al security guard shoots him to death.
  • 2002Benjamin O. Davis Jr., leader of the famed all-black Tuskegee Airmen during World War II and the first black general in the Air Force, died in Washington at age 89.
  • 2001Vladivostok Air Flight 352, a Tupolev Tu-154 enters a flat spin on approach to Irkutsk Airport in Irkutsk, Russia, crashes down onto its belly and bursts into flames in a wooded area, killing all 145 aboard.
  • 2000Malév Flight 262, a Tupolev Tu-154, lands on its belly at Thessaloniki International Airport in Greece. There are no serious injuries or fatalities.
  • 1997Mars Pathfinder (MESUR Pathfinder), American spacecraft carrying a base station with roving probe, lands on Mars
  • 19891989 Belgian MiG-23 crash: The pilot of a Soviet Air Force Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23M (Flogger-B) ejects shortly after take-off in Poland. The "runaway" pilotless aircraft flies across Europe before crashing into a Belgian farmhouse, killing an 18-year-old man.
  • 1988 – Death of Donald Roderick MacLaren, Canadian WWI fighter ace, who helped to found the Royal Canadian Air Force, and later formed Pacific Airways
  • 1983 – Launch of BOR-5, Russian space vehicle, 1:8 Buran model designed to test the main aerodynamic characteristics, thermal and acoustic loads and stability for the Shuttle Buran program.
  • 1982 – Landing: Space shuttle Columbia STS-4 at 16:09:31 UTC. Mission highlights: Last shuttle R&D flight, first DoD payload.
  • 1980 – A seven-year-old boy is killed and several others are injured when he manages to fire an ejection seat in Lockheed S-3A Viking, BuNo 159769, c/n 394A-1098, of VS-24, at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania during an open house.
  • 1979 – Death of Frank H. Ellis, early Canadian aviator, aircraft designer and author ("Canada's Flying Heritage", the first major study of the History of aviation in Canada). He was the First Canadian to make a parachute jump from an airplane in Canada.
  • 1977 – Patricia Undall and Nan Gaylord win the 30th and final annual women's United States transcontinental air race, nicknamed 'The Powder Puff Derby'.
  • 1975 – First flight of the Boeing 747SP, modified version of the Boeing 747 jet airliner which was designed for ultra-long-range flights. The SP stands for "Special Performance".
  • 1973 – A Grumman HU-16 Albatross, American large twin-radial engine amphibious flying boat, sets a world record for twin-engine amphibians reaching 32,883 feet.
  • 1961 – Birth of Richard Allen Garriott (Richard Garriott de Cayeux), British / American video game developer and entrepreneur and space self-funded tourist.
  • 1956 – A Lockheed U-2 reconnaissance aircraft makes its first operational overflight. It is designed to fly at subsonic speeds and photograph the earth from above 60,000 feet.
  • 1955 – An Anti-Submarine Helicopter Squadron was formed at HMCS Shearwater, Dartmouth, NS.
  • 1952 – 58 Republic F84 Thunderjets take off for a trans-ocean flight of 10,895 miles, with seven stops, from Georgia in the USA to Yokota in Japan.
  • 1950 – Seafires and Fireflies from Triumph strikes targets of opportunity in Korea, including a railway bridge and a column of North Korean troops.
  • 1948 – The Northwood mid-air collision between a Scandinavian Airlines System-operated Douglas DC-6 and an RAF Avro York kills all 39 passengers and crew in Britain's worst mid-air collision
  • 1946 – The aircraft carriers USS Antietam (CV-36) and USS Boxer (CV-21) are among ten U. S. Navy ships participating in the celebration at Manila of the independence of the Republic of the Philippines.
  • 1946 – Pacific Theatre ace Lt. Col. John C. "Pappy" Herbst (18 credited victories) is mortally injured at the age of 36 in front of 30,000 people at the San Diego County Fair when his Lockheed P-80A-1-LO Shooting Star, 44-85083, of the 445th Fighter Squadron, 412th Fighter Group, March Field, California, crashes after failing to pull up in a dive just west of the Del Mar Fairgrounds while flying with an early jet demonstration team. Herbst crashed in a dry riverbed near the Del Mar Racetrack after his aircraft stalled during an encore of their routine finale in which the pair of P-80s did a loop while configured to land. Herbst had married his second wife less than 24 hours before. Herbst's wingman, Major Robin Olds narrowly avoided the same fate while flying in formation
  • 1945 – 483 B-29 s drop 3,752 tons (3,403,792 kg) of bombs on Kōchi and other cities in Japan.
  • 1944 – Allied assault on Carpiquet airport at Caen.
  • 1943 – 17 Japanese bombers escorted by 66 fighters raid Rendova, destroying and damaging several landing craft.
  • 1943 – The prototype Platt-LePage XR-1 helicopter, 41-001, tested at Wright Field, Ohio, by the Rotary Branch of the Air Technical Service Command from May 1943, is damaged this date by the failure of a rotor blade spinner. Never ordered into production, its last flight will take place on 21 June 1946 with 91 hours, 45 minutes of flight time, and it will be donated the National Air Museum in Washington, D.C., where it remains in storage at the Paul Garber Facility at Silver Hill, Maryland.
  • 1943 – RAF Consolidated LB-30 Liberator II, AL523, crashes on takeoff from RAF North Front Field, Gibraltar, killing the exiled Polish Prime Minister General Władysław Sikorski, together with his daughter, his Chief of Staff, Tadeusz Klimecki, and seven others. The flight departed at 2307 hrs., coming down in the sea after only 16 seconds of flight. Only the pilot, Eduard Prchal (1911–1984), survives. "This crash is shrouded in mystery and intrigue. Throughout World War II Sikorski tried to organize the Polish Army and constantly negotiated with Churchill and Roosevelt to circumvent any appeasement deals between the Allies, Russia, and Germany which would come at Poland's expense. By this time, the Free Poles had found out about the Katyn Massacre, and thus terminated relations with the Soviet Union on 26 April 1943. As Sikorski was the most prestigious leader of the Polish exiles, his death was a severe setback to the Polish cause, and was certainly highly convenient for Stalin. It was in some ways also convenient for the western Allies, who were finding the Polish issue a stumbling-block in their efforts to preserve good relations with Stalin. This has given rise to persistent suggestions that Sikorski's death was not accidental. This has never been proved."
  • 1942 – US air offensive against nazi-Germany begins.
  • 1940 – In retaliation for the British attack at Mers-el-Kébir, French Air Force bombers raid Gibraltar, causing little damage.
  • 1940 – Last scheduled airmail flight by autogiro Kellett KD-1 is flown.
  • 1933 – Death of Henri Robida, French raid aviator.
  • 1930 – Brothers John, Kenneth, Albert, and Walter Hunter set a new record after a flight of 553 hours 40 min over Chicago using two Stinson SM-1 Detroiters as refueler and receiver.
  • 1929 – The Japanese aviator Masashi Goto crashes and is killed in Utah’s Uinta Mountains in the beginning stages of an attempted flight around the world by crossing the continents of North America, Europe and Asia.
  • 1922 – Death of Lothar-Siegfried Freiherr von Richthofen, German WWI fighter ace, younger brother of top-scoring ace Manfred von Richthofen, killed in the crash of his LVG C VI at Fuhlsbüttel due to an engine failure.
  • 1920 – Death of Jaime Gonzáles Grocier, early Cuban aviator, in a crash.
  • 1917 – Death of Ivan Alexandrovich Orlov, Russian WWI flying ace, Self Glider and Aircraft designer, killed in a dogfight with 4 Germans, Losing the lower right wing of his Nieuport and fatally crashing.
  • 1915 – Lt Oswald Boelcke claims his First victory, a Blériot Parasol, while flying an Albatros C. I two-seater with Lt von Wühlisch as the observer & gunner.
  • 1910 – Hubbard failed one attempted flight at the Montreal Air Meet. The Hubbard monoplane was the first aircraft ever sold in Canada and the first to be exported.
  • 1908 – The Zeppelin LZ-4 makes a 12-hour flight crossing the Alps. It covers the 235 miles from Friedrichshafen to Zürich and reaches speeds of 32 mph.
  • 1895 – A large German military balloon burst at the German Army's Balloon Department grounds. Five balloonists were injured.
  • 1894 – Birth of Arthur Laumann, German WWI flying ace who scored 28 victories in just over three months.
  • 1892] – Birth of Henry Maston Mullinnix, American aviator, engineer and Admiral of the US Navy during WWII, mainly responsible for developing the air-cooled engine for naval aircraft.
  • 1891 – Birth of William James Arthur "A rt" Duncan, Canadian WWI flying ace, Hockey player and coach post WWI.
  • 1858 – Birth of Marie Paul Jules Lebaudy, French industrial and politician, early dirigible pioneer along with his brother Joseph Marie Pierre Lebaudy.
  • 1798 – At least one balloon of the French army‘s Company of Aeronauts is transported aboard the French Navy warship Le Patriote for use ashore in conducting a reconnaissance of the coast of Egypt, but Le Patriote strikes a rock and sinks off Alexandria, Egypt.
  • 1753 – Birth of Jean-Pierre Blanchard, aka Jean Pierre François Blanchard, French inventor, most remembered as a pioneer in aviation and ballooning.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Teddy bear air invasion leads to ouster of 2 top generals in authoritarian Belarus" Associated Press, August 1, 2012.[dead link]
  2. ^ Weaver, Matthew (4 July 2012). "Syria crisis: Turkey finds bodies of downed pilots". Guardian. Retrieved 21 July 2012. 
  3. ^ Michael Gilbert (2007-07-06). "Fort Lewis soldier dies in copter crash". The News Tribune. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-07-07. 

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July 5

  • 2009 – SU-TYB, an Antonov An-28 operated by El Dinder Aviation, is damaged beyond repair when the nosewheel collapses on landing at Saraf Omra Airfield, Sudan.
  • 2009 – ZK-LGR, Britten-Norman Trislander operated by Great Barrier Airlines suffers an in-flight propeller disintegration, and débris penetrates the passenger cabin. An emergency landing is made at Great Barrier Aerodrome, New Zealand. No injuries are reported among the 11 people on board. The aircraft is substantially damaged.
  • 2007 – Two people have been killed and seven others injured following a plane crash in Indreabhán in Connemara, Galway.
  • 2007 – Unofficial reports indicate that at least nine people died as a result of a plane crash next to the airport of Culiacán in Mexico.
  • 2006North Korean missile test, 2006: North Korea tests four short-range missiles, one medium-range missile, and a long-range Taepodong-2. The long-range Taepodong-2 reportedly fails in mid-air over the Sea of Japan.
  • 1982 – An Italian Army Agusta-Bell 205 crashed in the Val Ridanna, pilot killed.
  • 1979 – French aviation pioneer and aircraft manufacturer Emile Dewoitine died at the age of 87.
  • 1972 – Ethiopian Airlines Flight 708 was a Boeing 720-060 B, due to operate an international scheduled Addis Ababa – Asmara – Athens – Rome – Paris passenger service, which experienced a hijacking attempt.
  • 1970Air Canada Flight 621, a Douglas DC-8, explodes following a failed landing at Toronto Pearson International Airport, with 109 fatalities.
  • 1969 – First flight of the Shenyang J-8, high-speed, high-altitude Chinese-built single-seat interceptor fighter aircraft.
  • 1955 – Sole prototype Supermarine Type 529, VX136, crashes while flying out of Boscombe Down, this date. Aircraft entered a spin at 10,000 ft which deteriorated into a flat spin from which the pilot, Lt. Cdr. Rickell, could not recover. Late ejection due to problems with jettisoning the canopy and operating the ejector seat - the seat did not have time to separate, nor did the parachute have time to fully deploy - Pilot killed on impact with the ground. The aircraft was completely destroyed.
  • 1945 – First prototype Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250, completed 26 February 1945, suffers failure of port tailplane at low altitude, killing test pilot Alexandr Deyev, when his parachute fails to open in time. Post-crash analysis revealed that he had exceeded the airframe's G limit while maneuvering.
  • 1945 – American Airlines acquires American Export Airlines and forms American Overseas Airlines.
  • 1945 – (5-11) Aircraft from the British aircraft carriers HMS Ameer and HMS Emperor strike Japanese airfields and shipping at Car Nicobar.
  • 1944 – The first U. S. rocket-powered military aircraft, the MX-324, flies at Harper Dry Lake, California. The pilot, Harry Crosby, makes the voyage.
  • 1943 – Death of Leonardo Ferrulli, Italian WWII fighter pilot bailing out too low from his damaged Macchi M. C. 205.
  • 1943 – Death of Franco Lucchini, Spanish War and WWII fighter Ace, shot down by heavy defensive fire of a B-17 formation over Catania.
  • 1942 – An American reconnaissance plane discovers that the Japanese are building an airfield on Guadalcanal.
  • 1940 – The first American paratrooper unit is formed at Fort Benning, Georgia.
  • 1940 – Shore-based Swordfish of the Fleet Air Arm’s No. 813 Squadron make a torpedo strike against Italian ships at Tobruk, sinking a transport and a destroyer, blowing the bow off another destroyer, and damaging an ocean liner.
  • 1939 – First scheduled airmail flight by autogiro from Philadelphia's 30th Street Post Office roof to Camden, New Jersey's Central Airport is made by John M. Miller with a Kellett KD-1 B.
  • 1938 – 400 aircraft support a Spanish Nationalist offensive in Valencia.
  • 1929Curtiss-Wright Corporation is formed, result of a merger of 12 companies associated with Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company of Buffalo, New York, and Wright Aeronautical of Dayton, Ohio.
  • 1928 – Arturo Ferrarin and Carlo Del Prete, Land their Savoia-Marchetti S.64 near Natal, Brazil, coming from Montecelio, Italy after a 49 h 19 m and 7 188 km flight.
  • 1927Lady Bailey establishes a new light airplane altitude record of 17,283 feet, in a de Havilland D. H. 60 Moth, at the company’s airfield in Edgeware, Middlesex.
  • 1920 – Dundalk Flying Field, opened in Baltimore, Maryland in 1920, is almost immediately renamed Logan Field when, on this date, Army Lt. Patrick H. Logan is fatally injured after his Nieuport 28, F6506, nicknamed the "Red Devil", of the 104th Observation Squadron, crashes at the airport's inaugural air show following a stall/spin. In response to the tragedy, the airfield is renamed in his honor, with the announcement of the new name being made at the closing ceremonies of the airshow during which he died.
  • 1920 – Camp Borden Ontario was taken over by the CAF from Department of Militia and Defence, to serve as a training centre.
  • 1919 – The first parachute jump by a Canadian from an airplane flying in Canada occurred at Crystal Beach, Ontario on this date.
  • 1919 – A Handley Page V/1500, on an attempt a non-stop Transatlantic flight from Newfoundland to New-York is forced to land in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia for repairs.
  • 1917 – First flight of The Fokker Dr.I Dreidecker, famous WWI German triplane fighter aircraft.
  • 1913 – A seaplane carrier participates in the Royal Navy’s annual maneuvers for the first time, as HMS Hermes embarks two seaplanes, the Short Folder S.64 biplane and a Caudron G.3 amphibian. The Short aircraft is the first with folding wings to be used aboard a ship. The maneuvers, which conclude on October 6, demonstrate both the feasibility of extended operations by aircraft at sea and the value of folding wings.
  • 1912Royal Flying Corps (RFC) Captain Eustace Loraine and his observer Staff Sergeant R H V Wilson were flying a Nieuport Monoplane out of Larkhill, Wiltshire, England on a routine morning practice sortie. They were executing a tight turn when the aircraft fell towards the ground and crashed. Wilson was killed outright and although Loraine was speedily transported to Bulford Hospital in a horse-drawn ambulance, he succumbed to his wounds only a few minutes after arriving at the Hospital. Loraine and Wilson were the first Flying Corps personnel to die in an aircraft crash while on duty. Later in the day an order was issued which stated "Flying will continue this evening as usual", thus beginning a British aviation tradition.
  • 1912 – Captain Charles Chandler and Lieutenants Thomas Milling and Henry Arnold are presented with certificates qualifying them as the U. S.’s first “Military Aviators. ”
  • 1910Bert Pither is reputed to have flown the first metal-framed aircraft at Riverton, New Zealand.
  • 1874 – Belgian Vincent de Groof is killed in an accident as he tries to do a flight using flapping wings.
  • 1802 – French André-Jacques Garnerin made a balloon ascent with Edward Hawke Locker from Lord's Cricket Ground, traveling the 17 miles from there to Chingford in just over 15 min and carrying a letter of introduction signed by the Prince Regent.

References[edit]

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July 6

  • 2013Asiana Airlines Flight 214, a Boeing 777, crashes short of the runway on landing at San Francisco International Airport, killing three of 307 on board and injuring 182. The crash is the first fatal accident involving the Boeing 777, the first fatal accident in the United States since 2009, and the first fatal accident in North America involving a major airline since 2001.
  • 2011 – The 2011 Silk Way Airlines Ilyushin Il-76 crash: An Ilyushin Il-76 crashes into a mountain 25 kilometers short of Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan, killing all 9 people on board the cargo flight from Baku, operated on behalf of NATO.
  • 2008 – Death of Joseph Otis Fletcher, American Air Force pilot and polar researcher, first pilot to land at the North pole along with William Pershing Benedict with a C-47.
  • 1998 – Hong Kong’s Kai Tak Airport was closed at 1:28 am with the lights of its 13/31 runway being switched off. Operation of the new Hong Kong International Airport at Chek Lap Kok commenced on the same day, with the first commercial flight landing at 6:25 am.
  • 1996Delta Air Lines Flight 1288, a McDonnell Douglas MD-88, experiences an uncontained engine failure during takeoff on Runway 17 at Pensacola, Florida. Fragments from the number one (left) Pratt & Whitney JT8D-219 turbofan engine penetrated the fuselage, killing two and seriously injuring one of the 148 people on board.
  • 1993 – Death of Olive Ann Beech, U. S. aviation pioneer and businesswoman, who founded the Beech Aircraft Company with her husband Walter Herschel Beech.
  • 1996Delta Air Lines Flight 1288, a McDonnell Douglas MD-88 with 142 people on board, experiences an uncontained catastrophic turbine engine failure during its takeoff roll at Pensacola Regional Airport in Escambia County, Florida. The failure causes debris from the front compressor hub of the left engine to enter the passenger compartment, killing two passengers and injuring five others, two of them seriously. The pilot aborts the takeoff.
  • 1989 – One of two McDonnell-Douglas F-15 Eagles of the 33rd TFW, Eglin AFB, Florida, engaged in 2V2 (two versus 2) aerial combat maneuvers with two Lockheed Martin F-16 Fighting Falcons of the Alabama Air National Guard, crashes at 1456 hrs. near Lamison, Alabama a small community ~80 miles SW of Montgomery, the pilot, Capt. Leo Moore of the 58th Tactical Fighter Squadron, ejecting safely. Moore, unhurt, is rescued less than an hour later, said Sandy Mau, a Selma Times-Journal reporter, by an Air National Guard helicopter vectored to him from Danley Field by the F-16 pilots who were flying close enough to Moore to pinpoint his location, said S/Sgt. Dave Beaulieu, 33rd TFW spokesman. Tim Henderson, of nearby Millers Ferry, said that he saw Moore's jet flying low across his pasture minutes before the crash. "It was flying maybe a little over the treetops, very low", Henderson said. "He wasn't flying very fast to be flying so low, and it kind of sounded like the engine was cutting out." The fighter impacted on a ridge in a rural, virtually inaccessible area and Air Force investigators were having difficulty reaching the site, said Mau. The Eagle was completely destroyed. "It just burned up", said Beaulieu. The two F-15s had departed from Eglin at ~1410 hrs. to rendezvous with the F-16s. Moore's fighter was carrying an inert infrared-guided Sidewinder, Beaulieu said. He didn't know how much training the airmen got in before the crash, which occurred ~120 miles NE of Eglin. The pilot underwent a medical check at Eglin regional Hospital and then was sent home, said Beaulieu. "He's fine. He's pretty shaken up, but doing well."
  • 1982 – After the engine fire warning lights illuminate for two of their Ilyushin Il-62′s four engines shortly after takeoff from Moscow’s Sheremetyevo International Airport, the pilots of Aeroflot Flight 411 shut down the engines and attempt to return to the airport on their two remaining engines. The plane crashes in a field in Mendeleyevo, killing all 90 people on board. The engine fire warnings are later reported to be have been false alarms.
  • 1982 – A United States Navy F-4S crashed off USS Forrestal following failure of the catapult strap, pilot missing.
  • 1976 – Launch of Soyuz 21, Soviet manned mission to the Salyut 5 space station.
  • 1965 – The 1965 Little Baldon Hastings accident occurred when a Handley Page Hastings C1 A transport aircraft operated by No. 36 Squadron Royal Air Force, registration TG577, crashed into a field in Little Baldon, near Chiselhampton, Oxfordshire, shortly after taking off from RAF Abingdon. All 41 aboard, including six crew, perished in the crash, making it the third worst air crash in the United Kingdom at the time.
  • 1964 – U. S. Marine Corps UH-34D transport helicopters airlift a 93-man relief force during the Battle of Nam Dong in South Vietnam.
  • 1960 – Sikorsky’s S-62 amphibious helicopter wins federal approval for operation as a commercial passenger aircraft.
  • 1960 – Goodyear ZPG-3W, BuNo 144242, lost hull pressure, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off of New Jersey, eighteen of twenty-one crew lost. This was the last U.S. Navy lighter-than-air loss as it leads to cancellation of airship operations on 28 June 1961. Contributing reason of suspension of airship operations is improved speed of Soviet subs.
  • 1959 – A USAF Douglas C-124A-DL Globemaster II, 49-254A, c/n 43183, Jumbo 14, of the 3d Strategic Support Squadron, Strategic Air Command, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, is involved in a Broken Arrow when it crashes on takeoff from that base at 1411 hrs. CST, two minutes after the start of the takeoff roll, coming down 3,300 feet (1,000 m) S and slightly to the right of runway 14. The cargo load of an unspecified number and type of nuclear weapons was to be transported to Little Rock AFB, Arkansas. One weapon was destroyed by the post-crash fire which also burned out the airframe. No nuclear or high explosive detonation occurred, and contamination was limited to a confined area directly below the weapon. Six flight crew of crew R-41, and one substitution, all survived the crash. Although they denied any knowledge of engine malfunctions during the takeoff roll, witnesses stated that one or more engines were after firing or backfired from the beginning of the roll throughout the entire flight. After approximately 6,000 feet (1,800 m) of ground roll, the airframe assumed a nose high attitude as it climbed to between 50 and 100 feet (30 m), with one or more engines after firing excessively during the climb. The aircraft leveled off briefly before again assuming a nose high attitude when it then settled back to earth amidst smoke and dust. An intense fire then broke out (the aircraft was carrying ~5,000 gallons of fuel). After firefighters extinguished the blaze, weapons were removed using a M246 wrecker and a 40-foot (12 m) trailer.
  • 1952 – Death of Carl Oskar Ursinus, pioneer of German aviation and is remembered mainly for his contributions to sailplane designs and the sport of gliding. He has been nicknamed the Rhönvater ("Rhön father") because he founded Germany’s first gliding club at the Wasserkuppe in the Rhön Mountains. He also pursued experiments in human-powered flight.
  • 1952 – Death of Maryse Bastié, Born Marie-Louise Bombec, French Aerobatic and raid aviator, Crashing with the 2nd prototype Nord 2501 Noratlas in Lyon-Bron, France.
  • 1950 – U. S. Navy Patrol Squadron 46 (VP-46), based at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, begins maritime air patrols of the Taiwan Strait and coast of China to guard against any People’s Republic of China action against Taiwan while the Korean War is raging.
  • 1948 – The US Navy's first two carrier-based AEW squadrons are formed, VAW-1 and VAW-2.
  • 1943 – A strike by 39 U. S. aircraft destroys a Japanese destroyer beached on Kolombangara island after the Battle of Kula Gulf.
  • 1940 – Twelve Swordfish aircraft from Ark Royal make a torpedo strike against Mers-el-Kébir, sinking a French patrol boat and badly damaging the beached battlecruiser Dunkerque. It is the most successful aerial torpedo attack against a capital ship in history at the time.
  • 1939 – Olga Klepikowa sets a world record by flying an Antonow RF-7 glider 746 km (466 miles) from Moscow to Otradnoje.
  • 1939 – First Autogyro air mail service. Eastern Air Lines, from Philadelphia Post Office to Camden NJ, in a Kellett KD-1 B.
  • 1937 – A Spanish Republican offensive against Brunete begins, supported by 300 aircraft; the Republicans will use Polikarpov I-15 fighters at night for the first time during the battle, opposing night-bombing German Heinkel He 111 bombers. The Nationalists redeploy German aircraft of the Condor Legion from north to central Spain to support Nationalist ground forces around Brunete.
  • 1934 – French Francois and Génin win the Bibesco cup at an average speed of 313.4 km/h with the A. N. F. Les Mureaux 112 GR raid prototype.
  • 1922 – The first use of naval aircraft in combat in Latin America takes place in Brazil during the first Tenente revolt when two Brazilian Navy aircraft bomb the rebellious Fort Copacabana in Rio de Janeiro.
  • 1919 – The first person to arrive in the United States by air from Europe is Englishman Flt. Lt. J. E. M. Pritchard. He arrives with the airship R.34, which has entered American skies after leaving Scotland on July 2 to cross the North Atlantic.
  • 1914 – Death of Georges Legagneux, early French aviator who set altitude records, in the crash of his monoplane near Saumur, France.
  • 1866 – First South American military balloon reconnaissance ascent. The 6th of July, Lieutenant Colonel Roberto A. Chodasiewicz, an Argentine Army military engineer, makes the first South American military observation ascent, manning a Brazilian Army’s captive ballon over Paraguayan troops, during the Triple Alliance War.
  • 1819 – First woman to be killed in an aviation accident: Sophie Blanchard, when her hydrogen-filled balloon caught fire and crashed to the ground.

References[edit]

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July 7

  • 2012 – A video is released showing Syrian rebels claiming to have shot down a Syrian government surveillance aircraft and showing pieces of the aircraft. It is the first time that Syrian rebels have claimed to have shot down a government aircraft.[1]
  • 2010 – The Boeing 787 Dreamliner makes its first international appearance at the Farnborough Airshow, UK.
  • 2010 – (7–8) The Solar Impulse I HB-SIA makes a circumnavigation of the planet, the first by a solar powered aircraft. The flight also set records for length of flight and altitude for solar powered aircraft.
  • 2010 – A United States Coast Guard Sikorsky HH-60 Jayhawk crashed off of La Push, Washington apparently after clipping power lines.
  • 2009 – A Serbian Air Force MiG-29 crashes while performing aerobatic maneouvres in preparation for an upcoming airshow, killing the pilot Lt. Col. Rade Randjelovic and a soldier on the ground while injuring another.
  • 2006 – Antonov An-12 B operated as Mango Airlines of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) had engine failure after departure from Goma for Kisangani, and crashed into a hill and burned 10 km NW of Sake, DRC on return to Goma, killing all 6 aboard. (Reg RA-11338 was sold to Angola as D2-FRC in May 2000, then 9U-BHN and later 9Q-CVT).
  • 2003 – Launch of Opportunity, MER-B (Mars Exploration Rover – B), American robotic rover towards the planet Mars
  • 2002 – (7-14) The 15th FAI World Precision Flying Championship takes place in Zagreb, Croatia. The individual winners are 1. Lubos Hajek (Czech Republic, in a Cessna 152), 2. Janusz Darocha (Poland, in a Cessna 152), 3. Predrag Crnko (Croatia, in a Cessna 150). Team winners are 1. the Czech Republic, 2. Poland, 3. Croatia.
  • 1988 – Launch of Phobos 1, Soviet unmanned space mission to study Mars.
  • 1981 – First solar-powered aircraft flight across the English Channel. MacCready Solar Challenger flew 163 miles from Pontoise – Cormeilles Aerodrome, north of Paris, France to Manston Royal Air Force Base in Manston, United Kingdom, staying aloft 5 hours and 23 min, with pilot Stephen Ptacek at the controls, powered by at least 16,128 solar cells on the upper surfaces of the wing and tailplane.
  • 1983 – A standard production Learjet 55 sets six time-to-climb records.
  • 1965 – McDonnell Aircraft completes its 1,000th F-4 Phantom II.
  • 1963 – Death of Frank Purdy Lahm, American aviation pioneer, US first military aviator", and a general officer in the US Army Air Corps and Army Air Forces.
  • 1963 – Marine Corps Reserve pilot Capt. John W. Butler, 30, of Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania, suffers electrical failure in North American F-1E Fury BuNo 143609 during ground control intercept mission in a flight with three other aircraft, losing directional instruments, radio contact, at 36,000 feet. Ejects at low altitude after trying everything he can to regain control. Fury strikes ballfield at Green Hill Day Camp, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, skids 500 yards through some trees, a high hedge, and strikes a bathhouse in which ~30 persons have taken shelter from a severe thunderstorm. Seven on ground are killed, 15 injured.
  • 1962 – First flight (conventional) of The Lockheed XV-4 Hummingbird (originally designated VZ-10), US Army project to produce a V/STOL vertical take off/landing jet prototype.
  • 1962Alitalia Flight 771, a Douglas DC-8, hits high terrain while descending due to navigation error near Junnar, Maharashtra, India; all 94 die.
  • 1962 – Colonel Georgi Mossolov sets a new world absolute speed record for airplanes, flying the Soviet Air Force Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152 (fictitiously registered with FAI as Ye-166) at 2,681 km/h (1,666 mph).
  • 1961 – First flight of the Mil Mi-8 'Hip', soviet medium twin-turbine transport helicopter that can also act as a gunship. The Mi-8 is the world's most-produced helicopter,
  • 1960 – USSR shoots down a US aircraft over Barents sea.
  • 1960 – A Royal Air Force (RAF) Vickers Varsity T.1 WJ914 collided at 1500 ft near RAF Oakington, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom with a RAF de Havilland Vampire T11 XD549, all six occupants of the Varsity and two in the Vampire died.
  • 1950 – First Farnborough airshow held.
  • 1950 – Third prototype of three Vought XF7U-1 Cutlass twin-tailed fighters, BuNo 122474, suffers engine explosion during flight exhibition at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Vought test pilot Paul Thayer ejects, parachutes into two feet of water, airframe impacts on island in the Patuxent River. Pilot is returned safely to the admiral's reviewing stand, show announcer inquires "What will you do for an encore Mr. Thayer?" He learns that he suffered fracture to small bone at base of spine – later tells Vought management that he was the only manager who actually "broke his ass for the Company."
  • 1948Silver City Airways, with a Bristol Freighter, operated the world's first cross-Channel air ferry service between Lympne near Folkestone in Kent and Le Touquet, France
  • 1946 – Eccentric, iconoclastic millionaire and aviator Howard Hughes is gravely injured when he mishandles a propeller pitch control failure and crashes his controversial Hughes XF-11 reconnaissance plane, 44-70155, during its maiden flight. Aircraft impacts homes in the Beverly Hills neighborhood near the Los Angeles Country Club golf course where Hughes was attempting an emergency landing.
  • 1945 – On the first flight of the prototype Mitsubishi J8M1 Shusui, Japanese derivative of the Me 163B, aircraft reaches 1,300 feet in a steep climb, then the rocket motor cut out, airframe crashing at Yokosuka Naval Aeronautical Engineering Arsenal. Cause believed either hydrogen peroxide shifting to rear of partially empty tank, or air leak in fuel line causing blockage. Pilot Lt. Cdr. Toyohiko Inuzuka dies in hospital the next day. A redesign of the fuel system follows, but no additional flights made before Japanese capitulation in August.
  • 1945 – First flight of the Arsenal VB-10, French fighter prototype. It added a second engine behind the cockpit which drove a second propeller, coaxial with and counter-rotating to the propeller driven by the engine in the nose.
  • 1945 – 568 B-29 s drop 4,227 tons (3,834,709 kg) of bombs on Chiba and other cities in Japan.
  • 1942 – The U. S. Army Air Forces activate the China Air Task Force.
  • 1937 – The Marco Polo Bridge Incident begins the Second Sino-Japanese War.
  • 1937 – Curtiss receives the largest order placed with an airplane manufacturing company since 1918 when the United States Army Air Corps orders 210 P-36 Hawks
  • 1929 – Pilot D. S. Zimmerley in a Barling NB-3 bomber set a long-distance record, flying from Brownsville, Texas to Winnipeg, 16 hrs.
  • 1927 – T. B Tull & J. V. Medcalf were the first Canadians to attempt a transatlantic flight. They departed Harbour Grace Nfld. and were lost at sea.
  • 1919 – Death of Oskar Bider, Swiss aviation pioneer, Killed while demonstrating his Nieuport 21 fighter.
  • 1917 – In daylight, German Gotha bombers make a third attack on England, killing 65 people and injuring 245.
  • 1914 – American physics professor, Robert H. Goddard receives a patent for his two-stage solid fuel rocket.

References[edit]

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July 8

  • 2011Hewa Bora Airways Flight 952, a Boeing 727, crashes on landing at Bangoka International Airport, Democratic Republic of the Congo, killing 74 of 118 on board.
  • 2011 – Launch: Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-135 at 15:29 UTC. Mission highlights: Payload Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello. Final flight of Atlantis, final flight of the Space Shuttle program.
  • 2010 – The first Solar Impulse aircraft, HB-SIA, the first solar-powered aircraft capable of both day and night flight thanks to its batteries charged by solar power, makes its first overnight flight, taking off from Payerne Airport outside Payerne, Switzerland, and returning after 26 hours 10 minutes 19 seconds in the air, the first overnight flight by a solar-powered aircraft and the longest flight in history up to this time by a manned solar-powered aircraft. The flight also sets a record for the highest altitude ever attained by a manned solar-powered aircraft, reaching 8,744 meters (28,687 feet) above ground and 9,235 meters (30,298 feet) in absolute altitude.[1][2]
  • 2008 – Three Airmen of the 319th Special Operations Squadron, 1st Special Operations Wing, avoid serious injury when the leased Pilatus PC-12 they are training in crashes at the end of the runway at Hurlburt Field, Florida, Eglin Auxiliary Field 9, at ~2330 hrs. as they attempt a landing. The initial investigation finds that the turboprop encountered wake turbulence from another aircraft that had landed shortly before the accident. As a precaution, the three crew were taken to the Eglin hospital and released the same afternoon. Hurlburt leases the PC-12 to train Airmen for the U-28A, the Air Force's version of the single-engine utility aircraft, used in combat for intra-theatre support for the special operations forces.
  • 2007 – Boeing 787 Rollout (7/8/2007) in Everett, Washington’s Boeing Everett Factory.
  • 2003Sudan Airways Flight 139, a Boeing 737-200, crashes shortly after taking off from Port Sudan, Sudan. The plane crashes into a hill while attempting an emergency landing. All 117 on board the plane perish; a two-year-old boy initially survives the crash, but dies the following day.
  • 2000Aerocaribe Flight 7831, a British Aerospace Jetstream 32, crashes near Chulum Juárez, Mexico, killing all 19 on board.
  • 1999 – Death of Charles "Pete" Conrad, Jr., American naval officer, test pilot, astronaut and engineer, and the third person to walk on the Moon.
  • 1994 – Launch: Space Shuttle Columbia STS-65 at 12:43:01 pm EDT. Mission highlights: First Shuttle-Mir docking.
  • 1988 – (8-13) 11-year old Chris Marshall flies a Mooney M20 from San Diego to Paris.
  • 1967 – Boeing B-52 Stratofortress 56-0601 overran the runway on landing at Da Nang Air Base, Vietnam with the loss of five of her six crew. The aircraft had suffered an electrical malfunction that led to the flameout of two engines and was attempting to make an emergency landing.
  • 1966 – US airline strike begins and lasts until Aug 19th.
  • 1965Canadian Pacific Air Lines Flight 21, a Douglas DC-6, crashes near 100 Mile House, British Columbia after the explosion of a device in the lavatory; all 46 passengers and six crew aboard perish.
  • 1965 – Death of Albert Paul Mantz, American noted air racing pilot and movie stunt pilot, while flying the very unusual aircraft (Tallmantz Phoenix P-1) for the movie 'The Flight of the Phoenix'.
  • 1962 – Alitalia Flight 771, a Douglas DC-8-43, crashes 11 km (6.8 mi) northwest of Junnar, India, while on approach to a landing at Bombay 84 km (52 mi) to the northeast. All 94 people on board die.
  • 1960 – First flight of the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-150, prototype single-seat fighter/interceptor, part of the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-150 family.
  • 1959 – The Argentine Navy commissions its first aircraft carrier, (V-1). She is the first aircraft carrier to enter service in Latin America.
  • 1958 – First flight of the Borgward Kolibri, German three-seated utility helicopter, First German helicopter after WWII.
  • 1958 – A Lockheed U-2A, 56-6713, Article 380, of the SAC's 4028th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (SRS), based at Laughlin Air Force Base, Del Rio, Texas, is lost near Wayside, Texas, when it goes out of control at high altitude, killing RAF pilot, Sqn. Ldr. Christopher Walker, one of four RAF officers in U-2 training. This aircraft, the 40th U-2 built, was delivered to the USAF in July 1957, and assigned to the 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Laughlin AFB, Texas, where it was configured as a "ferret" aircraft.
  • 1956 – A USAF Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star, based out of Lackland AFB, Texas, crashes into side of Pleasant Mountain in Denmark, Maine, killing Capt. Gordon L. Draheim. Cause determined to be disorientation and fuel exhaustion.
  • 1952 – Israeli IAF/DF de Havilland Mosquito T.3, 2119, as Capt. Daniel Shapira demonstrates a take-off to Lt. Ze'ev Tavor it goes badly, airframe ending up in the weeds. Despite this, both pilots eventually become test pilots. This was the first Israeli loss of the type.
  • 1950 – U. S. Navy P2 V-3 Neptunes of Patrol Squadron 6 (VP-6) begin air patrols along the east coast of Korea.
  • 1948 – A USAF Douglas C-47A-30-DK Skytrain, 43-48256[157] crashes near Wiesbaden, Germany, killing three crew. This was the first accident during the Berlin Airlift. KWF were 1st Lt. George B. Smith, 1st Lt. Leland V. Williams, and Karl v. Hagen of the Department of the Army. (One source incorrectly lists this crash as involving a C-54 Skymaster.)
  • 1946 – First of two Vought XF4U-5 Corsairs, created by mating Vought F4U-4 Corsair BuNo 97296 with a Pratt & Whitney R-2800-32W radial engine, first flown 3 July 1946, lost during routine test flight when pilot Bill Horan attempts dead-stick landing at Stratford, Connecticut. Airframe destroyed, pilot killed.
  • 1944 – The second B-29 Superfortress raid on Japan attacks four cities on Kyūshū from bases in China.
  • 1944 – Swordfish aircraft from the British Merchant Aircraft Carrier (or “MAC-ship”) MV Empire MacCallum mistakenly sink the Free French submarine La Perle. It is the only time that MAC-ship-based aircraft sink a submarine.
  • 1943 – British air raid sinks U-232.
  • 1941 – A trial raid by three Royal Air Force Fortress I heavy bombers on the naval barracks at Wilhelmshaven, Germany, is the first combat use of any variant of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress.
  • 1940 – Aircraft from the British aircraft carrier HMS Hermes torpedo the French battleship Richelieu at Dakar, Senegal, damaging her. Richelieu is not seaworthy again for a year.
  • 1940 – (Overnight) 64 British bombers strike airfields in the Netherlands and ports in north Germany and lay sea mines. Germany’s first specialized night fighter unit, Nachtjagdgeschwader 1, scores its first victory, as Oberfeldwebel Hermann Förster shoots down a Whitley off Heligoland.
  • 1940 – (8-13) Italian high-level bombers subject ships of the British Mediterranean Fleet to repeated heavy attacks while the fleet is at sea in the Mediterranean. They score only one hit, on the light cruiser HMS Gloucester.
  • 1932 – Supermarine Scapa1908 – Thérèse Peltier officially becomes the first woman to fly in an aeroplane. She is a passenger on a flight made by Léon Delagrange at Turin. However, this flight may not have been fully controlled.
  • 1838Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin is born in Baden, Germany. The first large-scale builder and pioneer of rigid dirigible balloons, Zeppelin made his first balloon ascent while serving as a volunteer and observer for the Union Army in America’s Civil War.

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July 9

  • 2010 – The Qinetiq Zephyr, lightweight solar-powered UAV designed for use in observation and communications relay, takes off for an endurance record.
  • 2006S7 Airlines Flight 778, an Airbus A310, crashes into a concrete barricade and catches fire on landing in Irkutsk, Russia. Of the 203 people on board, 128 are killed.
  • 1991 – Bombardier-Navigator Lt. Keith Gallagher suffers partial ejection from U.S. Navy Grumman KA-6D Intruder, BuNo 152911, '515', of VA-95, from the USS Abraham Lincoln in the Indian Ocean, four days out of Singapore headed NW for patrol duty in the Persian Gulf. While flying at 8,000 feet, seven miles abeam the ship, heading aft, the B/N's ejection seat suffers an uncommanded partial activation of the ejection seat, which leaves him hanging out of the canopy. Pilot Lt. Mark Baden makes immediate return to the ship, lands safely, Gallagher surviving and returning to flight duty six months later. Pilot is awarded the Navy Air Medal and the LSO on the carrier the "Bug Roach Paddles Award" for his part in the successful recovery.
  • 1982Pan Am Flight 759, a Boeing 727, crashes in Kenner, Louisiana, shortly after takeoff; all 145 on board and 8 people on the ground are killed.
  • 1964United Airlines Flight 823, a Vickers Viscount, crashes near Parrottsville, Tennessee after a fire on board; all 39 passengers and crew die.
  • 1964 – Lockheed test pilot Bill Park ejects safely from Lockheed A-12, 60-6939, Article 133, on approach to Groom Dry Lake, Nevada during test flight after total hydraulic failure. Park ejects laterally at 200 feet altitude on approach. The cause of the accident was temperature gradients in the outboard elevon serve valve. The aircraft had made ten flights for a total of 8.17 hours.
  • 1960Sabena begins airlifting Belgian nationals out of Congo. Over the next three weeks, 25,711 will fly home
  • 1958 – A second Lockheed U-2A, 56-6698, Article 365, of the SAC's 4028th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (SRS) based at Laughlin Air Force Base, Del Rio, Texas, crashes SW of Tucumcari, New Mexico, killing its pilot, Capt. Al Chapin Jr., the second in two days. It went out of control at high altitude. This aircraft, the 25th U-2, and fifth of the first USAF production batch, was delivered to the Air Force at Groom Lake in January 1957, moving to the 4080th SRW at Laughlin AFB in June: 1957.
  • 19561956 Trans-Canada Air Lines accident: Flight 304, a Vickers Viscount, sheds a propeller blade over Flat Rock, Michigan; the blade penetrates the passenger cabin, killing one of 35 aboard; this is the first known case of a turboprop shedding a blade in passenger service.
  • 1945 – An RCAF Supermarine Spitfire from Rivers, Manitoba, photographed the eclipse of the sun for the first time in history, from 34,000 feet.
  • 1944 – Death of Ingvar Fredrik Hakansson, Swedish WWII pilot in the RAF, Drowned at sea near Dungeness after his Spitfire was damaged by the explosion of the V-1 he was attacking.
  • 1943 – (overnight) 160 British Army glider infantrymen land on Sicily’s Maddalena Peninsula, seizing coastal artillery batteries, a radio station, and the Ponte Grande bridge in advance of Allied amphibious landings on the morning of July 10.
  • 1941 – In a span of under three hours, three Junkers Ju 88As suffer controlled flight into terrain in northeast England, believed to be due to a British radio counter-measure 'Meacon' which falsifies German navigational beacon signals and caused the planes to fly headlong into coastal hills. The first Ju 88A comes in from the sea in mist and flies into the ground at Speeton near Bridlington at 2348 hrs. All crew KWF. At 0006 hrs., another Junkers flies into a cliff at Cliff Farm, Staithes, Yorkshire, in bad weather, killing all crew. A third bomber comes in from the sea in mist and flies into the ground at a shallow angle at Speeton near Bridlington at 0120 hrs. The aircraft is burnt by the crew who are all captured.
  • 1941 – Under attack at their airfield by a 27-aircraft Soviet Air Force bomber regiment, Luftwaffe Major Günther Lützow of Jagdgeschwader 3 and his Messerschmitt Bf 109 F fighter unit take off and shoot down all 27 Soviet bombers without loss to themselves.
  • 1940 – The indecisive Battle of Calabria is the first major fleet action of World War II between the British and Italian navies. Swordfish from the British aircraft carrier HMS Eagle conduct two torpedo strikes but score no hits.
  • 1940 – 40 Italian Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 bombers attack the British aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal and other ships of Force H off Sardinia. They drop over 100 bombs but score no hits, and Blackburn Skuas from Ark Royal shoot down two SM.79 s and damage two others.
  • 1940 – Death of Valerio Scarabellotto, Italian WWII pilot, killed in his Savoia-Marchetti S. M.79 during the Battle of Calabria, (known to the Italian Navy as the Battle of Punta Stilo),
  • 1933 – Flying their Lockheed Sirius built 1929 and used for the 1931 survey flight of Alaska, the North Pacific and China, Charles Lindbergh and his wife begin a major route-proving tour of the North and South Atlantic. They complete their survey on December 6.
  • 1924 – The first recorded flight of a live bull takes place when champion breeder Nico V is flown from Rotterdam, Holland to Paris, France. The bull is carried by KLM in a Fokker F.III transport aircraft.
  • 1910 – Frenchman Léon Morane sets a new speed record of 106 km/h (65.8 mph).
  • 1910 – Walter Brookins attains an altitude of 6,175 feet in a Wright biplane, becoming the first to fly a mile high and wins a prize of $5,000 for his feat.
  • 1910 – Frenchman Léon Morane sets a new speed record of 106 km/h.

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July 10

  • 2011Egypt ends its unrestricted immigration policy for Libyan nationals arriving in Egypt by air.[2]
  • 2006PIA Flight 688, a Fokker F27, crashes into a wheat field near Multan, Pakistan ten minutes after taking off, killing all 41 passengers and 4 crew members on board.
  • 2002Crossair Flight 850, a Saab 2000, strikes an earth bank after landing at Werneuchen Airfield after multiple diversions due to a storm system; all 20 on board survive; the aircraft is written off.
  • 2002 – A Sikorsky H-34 crashed and sank into the Brookville Reservoir in Brookville, Indiana. The pilot Steve Myler and co-pilot Joseph Rukazina, both made it out while the mechanic Michael Jarski lost his life.[3]
  • 1991L'Express Airlines Flight 508, a Beechcraft Model 99, crashes while on approach Birmingham Municipal Airport in Birmingham, Alabama, due to severe thunderstorms. Two survive the crash out of 15 on board.
  • 1985Aeroflot Flight 7425, a Tupolev Tu-154B, stalls while cruising at 38,000 feet (11,600 m) and enters an unrecoverable spin, killing all 200 aboard.
  • 1978 – Airbus Industrie announces a decision to proceed with development of the A300 B10, a shortened version of the A300 with a capacity of 225 passengers, compared to 281 on the B2 and B4. The designation is later changed to the A310.
  • 1968 – First flight of The Mil V-12 (also referred to as the Mi-12, NATO reporting name "Homer"), largest helicopter ever built.
  • 1965Skyways Coach-Air Avro 748 crashes on landing at Lympne Airport, Kent, United Kingdom due to a waterlogged runway; all 52 on board survive; this crash marks the first loss of the Avro 748/HS 748.
  • 1962 – Launch of Telstar 1, First satellite to relay television signals. It successfully relayed through space the First television pictures, telephone calls, fax images and provided the First live transatlantic television feed.
  • 1956 – Sgt DE Stevenson twice entered an aviation fuel fire at Montmedy, France, and brought it under control. He was awarded the George Medal.
  • 1953New York Airways becomes the First scheduled helicopter carrier in the USA and the First passenger helicopter carrier in the world
  • 1952 – A Boeing B-29-95-BW Superfortress, 45-21761, c/n 13655, converted to F-13A, crashes on the runway at Fairchild AFB, Washington, with ROTC cadets on board. There were no casualties, although the aircraft was a total loss and the hulk was later used by the fire department for practice fires.
  • 1945 – Aircraft from the 20 aircraft carriers of U. S. Navy Task Force 38 strike Tokyo and vicinity. In addition, 536 B-29 s drop 3,872 tons (3,512,655 kg) of bombs on Sendai and other cities in Japan.
  • 1943 – Operation Husky, the British and American landings on Sicily, begins supporting naval forces include the British aircraft carriers HMS Indomitable and HMS Formidable Axis aircraft attack Allied ships offshore, and a Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive bomber sinks the American destroyer USS Maddox (DD-622) with the loss of 212 lives. Floatplanes based on American light cruisers provide valuable spotting support for naval gunfire against targets ashore.
  • 1943 – Six U. S. Army Air Forces B-24 Liberators take off from Attu to fly the 1,300 miles (2,093 km) round-trip to attack the Japanese base at Paramushiro, in what would have been the first Allied air raid against the Kurile Islands; however, they are diverted en route to join B-25 Mitchells in attacking a convoy of Japanese transports, suffering one aircraft damaged before returning to Attu. On the same day a separate formation of eight B-25 s on its own initiative attempts to bomb Paramushiro; they bomb an unidentified land mass through overcast without knowing if it is Japan, the Kuriles, the Kamchatka Peninsula, or an unidentified North Pacific island.
  • 1942 – The Commander-in-Chief, United States Navy, Admiral Ernest J. King, orders U. S. Navy sea frontier commanders to establish a system by which commercial aviators can report submarine sightings. By November, the five major U. S. airlines, the Naval Air Transport Service, the U. S. Army’s Air Transport Command, and British flying boats on transatlantic routes all are involved.
  • 1940 – The fourth Messerschmitt Bf 109 F series prototype makes its first flight in Germany, powered by one of the new 1,350-hp Daimler Benz DB 601E.
  • 1939 – The Willoughby Delta 8 (or delta F), British small twin-engined aerodynamic test bed for a proposed flying wing airliner, crashes killing pilot Hugh Olley and the Delta's designer, Percival Willoughby.
  • 1938 – “Yankee Clipper” completes First passenger flight over Atlantic.
  • 1938 – Howard Hughes, with crew members Harry Connor, Tom Thurlow, Richard Stoddart and Ed Lund, begin a record-breaking round-the-world flight in a specially modified Lockheed Super Electra. They cut in half the time set by Wiley Post 1933; their flying time is 71 hours, 11 min, 10 seconds.
  • 1935 – Bell Aircraft Corporation is founded in Buffalo, New York.
  • 1929 – First flight of the Macchi M.67, Italian racing seaplane designed for the Schneider Trophy race.
  • 1924 – Japanese aircraft sink a ship for the first time, when Imperial Japanese Navy bombers use level bombing from an average height of 1,000 m (3,281 feet) over the course of four hours to sink the retired coast defense battleship Iwami off Yokosuka.
  • 1922 – The Aircraft Development Corporation is incorporated in Michigan in the United States. It later changes its name to Detroit Aircraft Corporation.
  • 1919 – Death of Jean Marie Dominique Navarre, French WWI fighter ace. While practicing for a flight through the Arc de Triomphe, Navarre crashed his plane and died at Villacoublay.
  • 1919 – British rigid airship, R-34, takes off from Long Island, New York, for a trip back to Pulham, Norfolk, for the First Atlantic double-crossing (return flight).
  • 1916 – First flight of The Savoia-Pomilio SP.2, Italian biplane reconnaissance and bomber aircraft, refined version of the SP.1, basic configuration from the Farman MF.11.
  • 1914July 10-11, German Reinhold Böhm flies his Albatros-biplane 24 hours and 12 min without refueling and nonstop. This one-man-flight record lasted until 1927.
  • 1910Walter Brookins attained an altitude of 6,175 feet in a Wright biplane on 9 Jul 1910, becoming the First to fly a mile high and wins a prize of $5,000 for his feat.
  • 1897 – Birth of Carlo Tosi, Italian WWI pilot.
  • 1877 – Birth of Hélène Dutrieu, Belgian – French cycling world champion, stunt cyclist, stunt motorcyclist, automobile racer, stunt driver, pioneer aviator, wartime ambulance driver, and director of a military hospital.

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July 11

  • 2011Angara Airlines Flight 5007, an Antonov An-24, ditches in the Ob River after an engine fire, killing 7 of 37 on board; the aircraft is written off.
  • 2002 – First flight of the Adam A500, a six-seat civil utility aircraft, pod-and-boom, push-pull configuration.
  • 1996 – An General Dynamics F-16C Block 50C Fighting Falcon, 91-0354, of the 77th Fighter Squadron, being relocated from Shaw AFB, South Carolina, to Eglin AFB, Florida, to avoid Hurricane Bertha, crashes at ~1530 hrs. into a neighborhood 20 miles N of Pensacola, Florida, following an engine failure, striking two homes and killing a four-year old boy. A man and woman in the house suffered burns. The pilot was forced to eject two miles short of the runway. The pilot was uninjured. The accident investigation showed foreign object damage to a fan blade caused a crack seven thousands of an inch (too small to visually spot). The blade was ingested into the engine. The engine had failed three times during the flight with two relights. With the third engine failure the pilot ditched the aircraft into what he hoped was an unpopulated area, and ejected at only 200 feet.
  • 1991Nigeria Airways Flight 2120, a Nationair McDonnell Douglas DC-8-61 chartered by Nigeria Airways to transport Nigerian pilgrims to Mecca, crashes shortly after takeoff from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, because of a fire caused by tire failure. All 261 on board die, including 14 Canadian crew members.
  • 1979 – America's First space station, Skylab (unmanned launch of space station), is destroyed as it re-enters the Earth's atmosphere over the Indian Ocean.
  • 1979 – Second Lockheed Have Blue stealth testbed, c/n 1002, was lost at Groom Lake, Nevada on its 52nd flight when a hydraulic leak set the aircraft on fire. The pilot, Lieutenant Colonel Ken Dyson, ejected safely, but the prototype was destroyed when it impacted 35 miles NW of Groom Lake. Like its predecessor, it was buried under the desert.
  • 1978 – The UK government agrees to fund development of the BAe 146
  • 1973Varig Flight 820, a Boeing 707, experiences an on-board fire and crashes near Paris, France, killing 123 out of 134 on board.
  • 1965 – A USAF Lockheed EC-121H-LO Warning Star, 55-136, of the 551st AEWCW, out of Otis AFB, Massachusetts, develops a fire in the number three (starboard inner) engine, attempts ditching in the North Atlantic ~100 miles E of Nantucket, Massachusetts. Night touchdown in zero-zero weather, while on fire, proves difficult, aircraft crashes and breaks apart. Of the 19 people on board, three crew members survive, 16 die. Seven of the crew bodies are never recovered.
  • 1963 – First flight of The Grumman American AA-1, American light, 2-seat aircraft which will lead to the AA-1 Yankee Clipper and AA-1 A Trainer, the Grumman American AA-1 B Trainer and TR-2 and the Gulfstream American AA-1 C Lynx and T-Cat, and later to the AA-5 family (Traveler/Cheetah/Tiger)
  • 1962 – Cosmonaut Micolaev set then record longest space flight – 4 days.
  • 1962Telstar 1 relayed its first, and non-public, television pictures (a flag outside Andover Earth Station) to Pleumeur-Bodou.
  • 1961United Airlines Flight 859, a Douglas DC-8, crashes on landing at Stapleton International Airport, killing 17 passengers and one person on the ground.
  • 1957 – First Lockheed F-104 Starfighter prototype, XF-104-LO, 53-7786, c/n 1001, with Lockheed test pilot Bill Park flying chase on an F-104A flown by Bob Matye during a tail flutter test, loses empennage in high speed, low altitude flight, successfully ejects using downward ejection seat. The XF-104 had a lower limit Mach than the F-104A and apparently reached the flutter limit sooner than A-model.
  • 1955 – The U. S. Air Force Academy is dedicated at its temporary location, Lowry Air Force Base. First class of 306 Cadets are sworn in at Lowry and were housed in renovated World War II barracks until the Colorado Springs location construction was complete in August 1958.
  • 1952 – Aircraft from the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers USS Princeton (CV-37) and USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Ocean (R68), the U. S. Marine Corps, the U. S. Air Force, and the Royal Australian Air Force conduct a massive attack on industrial targets in and around Pyongyang, Korea.
  • 1952 – First flight of the F-500 'Monitor' I, French 2 seat single engine monoplane trainer prototype.
  • 1949 – A U.S. Navy pilot trainee is killed when his Vought F4U-4 Corsair strikes a parked North American SNJ Texan at Naval Auxiliary Air Station Corry Field, Florida, upon returning from a period of field carrier landing practice. It approaches on landing, and the port wing strikes a static SNJ in a parking area and the Corsair "cartwheels" onto its back, killing the pilot
  • 1948 – First air bombing of Jerusalem.
  • 1946TWA Flight 513, a Lockheed L-049 Constellation, crashes near Reading, Pennsylvania after a fire in the baggage compartment; of the 6 crew on board, only one survives.
  • 1944 – A U.S. Army Air Force Boeing B-17G-75-BO Flying Fortress, 44-38023, en route from Kearney Army Airfield, Nebraska, to Dow Field, Maine, for overseas deployment, crashes into Deer Mountain in Parkertown Township in North Oxford, Maine, during a thunderstorm, killing all ten crew: Sgt. James A. Benson, Sgt. Gerald V. Biddle, 2nd Lt. John T. Cast, 2nd Lt. John W. Drake, 2nd Lt. William Hudgens, Cpl. John H. Jones, Staff Sgt. Wayne D. McGavran, Sgt. Cecil L. Murphy, 2nd Lt. Robert S. Talley, and Sgt. Clarence M. Waln. Locals saw the plane circling before it struck terrain 500 feet below the summit. It apparently descended below the clouds, struck treetops, and cartwheeled across the mountainside. Two days later, after a search by more than 100 spotters from the Civil Air Patrol, the Army Air Force, the Navy, and the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Boeing B-17’s wreckage was found on the side of the mountain. Ironically, this is the second worst military crash in Maine history, and it occurred the same day as an A-26 Invader crash at Portland that killed 21
  • 1944 – U.S. Army Lt. Phillip "Phee" Russell was attempting to land his Douglas A-26B-5-DT Invader, 43-22253, at the Portland-Westbrook Municipal Airport at 1645 hrs. this date. For reasons that were never fully determined, Russell lost control of the plane and crashed into a trailer park in a nearby neighborhood in South Portland, Maine. Two crew, and 19 people on the ground were killed and 20 people were injured—mostly women and children—making it the worst aviation accident in Maine history.
  • 1943 – Axis aircraft make a second major bombing raid against ships off Sicily, sinking two ammunition ships.
  • 1943 – (overnight) The U. S. Army Air Forces’ 52nd Troop Carrier Wing flies United States Army paratroopers from North Africa for a parachute landing in Sicily. The 144 transport aircraft fly in darkness at low level over Allied ships offshore and Allied troops on the front line, arriving during an Axis bombing attack, and both the ships and troops ashore mistakenly open fire on them. Twenty-three of the aircraft are shot down, with the loss of 100 lives.
  • 1942 – In the longest bombing raid of World War II, 24 (of 44 launched) British Lancaster bombers attack the Polish port of Danzig.
  • 1937 – The Imperial Japanese Army and Imperial Japanese Navy agree that if a full-scale war breaks out with China, the army will have the responsibility for operations in northern China and the navy in central and southern China.
  • 1937 – German Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters appear over the battlefield around Brunete, Spain, proving themselves much more effective than Republican Polikarpov I-15 fighters, although outnumbered by the I-15 s.
  • 1935 – Laura Ingalls arrives in Burbank, California after an 18-hour flight from Floyd Bennett Field, New York, making her the first woman to fly east to west across the United States.
  • 1934Howard Hughes Takes off from New York for a new distance record around the Northern Hemisphere with a Lockheed Electra 14.
  • 1922 – An international convention for the regulation of air navigation begins.
  • 1919 – President Woodrow Wilson signs the Naval Appropriations Act of 1920, which includes funding for the conversion of the collier USS Jupiter into the United States Navy’s first aircraft carrier.
  • 1915 – The first two flying pupils, H. Strachan Ince and F. Homer Smith graduated from the Curtis Aviation School Toronto Ont.
  • 1915 – Birth of Colin Purdie Kelly, Jr., American WWII bomber pilot, one of the First heroes of the war for sacrificing his own life to save his crew.
  • 1914 – Reinhold Böhm lands his Albatros-biplane after a 24 hours and 12 min without refueling and nonstop.
  • 1914 – Lincoln Beachy was the first pilot in Canada to Loop-the-loop and accomplish inverted flight. This was done at Winnipeg, Manitoba.
  • 1901 – The Wright brothers‘ arrive for another season at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, during which they will test their 1901 glider.
  • 1897 – Salomon August Andrée, Nils Strindberg and Knut Frænkel takes off their hydrogen balloon 'Eagle' for an arctic expedition.
  • 1892 – Birth of Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory KCB, DSO & Bar, WWI pilot and senior commander in the Royal Air Force during WWII.
  • 1889 – Birth of Walter Richard Brookins, First pilot trained by the Wright brothers for their exhibition team and Wrights' First pilot instructor.
  • 1886 – Birth of Ernest Thompson Willows, pioneer Welsh aviator and airship builder, First person in the United Kingdom to hold a pilots certificate for an airship.

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July 12

  • 2011 – An airstrip laid out along a stretch of highway near Rhebat in the Nafusa Mountains was opened by a senior NTC minister, allowing an air connection via a small private company, Air Libya, between Benghazi and the Amazigh rebels.[1]
  • 2001 – Launch: Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-104 at 05:04 am EDT. Mission highlights: ISS assembly flight 7A: Quest Joint Airlock.
  • 2000Hapag-Lloyd Flight 3378, an Airbus A310, lands 500 metres short of the runway in Vienna after running out of fuel in flight. There are no serious injuries or fatalities.
  • 1988 – Launch of Phobos 2, Soviet unmanned space mission to study Mars.
  • 1988 – First flight of The Scaled Composites Triumph, US twin-engine, business jet prototype designed and built by Burt Rutan's Scaled Composites for Beechcraft, known officially as the Model 143. The Williams FJ44 turbofan engine shared the maiden flight.
  • 1988 – U.S. Navy North American CT-39E Sabreliner, BuNo 158381, c/n 282-93, ex-N4701N, en route from Singapore to Subic Bay Naval Station, Philippines, comes down in the afternoon in the South China Sea near the Spratly Island archipelago, after radioing a distress signal of equipment failure. Vietnamese Navy ship (described by Joe Baugher as a fishing vessel) picks up three American crew, two men and one woman, said a spokesman at the Vietnamese embassy in Bangkok on 15 July, and took them to Vietnam where they were being "treated very kindly". Arrangements would be made to repatriate the crew. At this time the United States and Vietnam had not yet reestablished diplomatic relations.
  • 1985 – First flight of The Antonov An-71 (NATO reporting name: 'Madcap'), Soviet carrier-capable prototype AWACS aircraft, based on An-72, with a completely redesigned rear fuselage supporting the rotodome of the RADAR atop the broad chord forward swept fin.
  • 1983 – Death of Erich Warsitz, German WWII test pilot, chief test pilot at Peenemünde West. He is remembered as the First person to fly an aircraft under liquid-fueled rocket power also the First to fly an aircraft under turbojet power
  • 1971 – Piper PA-48 Enforcer, N202PE, c/n PE2-1001, crashes after structural failure due to flutter caused by a Piper-modified elevator trim tab, off of Vero Beach, Florida.9] Four of the heavily modified, turbine-powered TF-51 derivatives were built for the counter-insurgency rôle with two tested at Eglin AFB, Florida in 1983-1984, but no orders were ever placed.
  • 1957 – "Ike" became the first president to fly in a helicopter. President Eisenhower becomes the first U. S. president to fly in a helicopter when he is flown from the White House to an unnamed military post in a USAF Bell UH-13 J.
  • 1952 – First flight of the Bee Aviation 'Honey Bee', single seat light aircraft.
  • 1946 – Unarmed second prototype of the Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250, with strengthened tailplane after crash of first prototype on 5 July 1945, continues flight testing until this date when an engine fire forces an emergency landing and it is damaged beyond repair.
  • 1945 – A US Army Air Forces Douglas A-26C Invader, 44-35553, on a training flight has mid-air collision with Eastern Airlines Flight 45 from Washington, D.C. to Columbia, South Carolina, a Douglas DC-3, NC25647',' at ~3100 feet, 11.9 miles WNW of Florence, South Carolina at 1436 hrs. A-26 vertical fin strikes port wing of airliner, displaces engine of DC-3 which cuts into fuselage; A-26 tail sheared off, two crew parachute, one KWF. DC-3 pilot belly lands in cornfield, one passenger of 24 total on board killed.
  • 1944 – A Luftwaffe Junkers Ju 88 G-1 night fighter of 7 Staffel/NJG 2, bearing Geschwaderkennung code 4R+UR, on North Sea night patrol landed at RAF Woodbridge. This aircraft carried recent versions of the FuG 220 Lichtenstein SN-2 VHF-band radar, FuG 350 Naxos-Z and FuG 227 Flensburg homer[282] which were being successfully used to intercept RAF night bombers. The German crew had only just completed 100 hours of flight training, and had flown by compass heading, but proceeded on a reciprocal (opposite) course to that intended and thought they were over their own airfield. Within days, the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) analysed the radar equipment and devised countermeasures. This 'coup' repeated the events of the previous year, when a similar radar-equipped Ju 88 (pictured) was flown by a defecting crew to the UK The earlier Ju 88 R-1 nightfighter flown to RAF Dyce by its defecting crew the year before the 13 July 1944 event.
  • 1944 – The first allied jet fighter, the Gloster Meteor Mk 1, entered service with RAF 616 Squadron.
  • 1943 – Flying Officer J. H. Turnbull, a Royal Air Force Squadron Beaufighter pilot, shot down three German Ju-88 bombers over Sicily.
  • 1943 – Germany and Italy mount all air opposition against Allied forces in Sicily from bases in Sardinia and mainland Italy from this date.
  • 1943 (midnight) – An attack by the Allied Northwest African Air Force destroys the headquarters of the Italian Sixth Army at Enna, Sicily.
  • 1941 – Moscow is bombed by the German Luftwaffe for the first time.
  • 1932 – A Junkers J13 crashed near Zlín airport on take off, Czech Republic, killing Tomáš Baťa, Czech entrepreneur, founder of Bata Shoes company. He also founded along with his brother Jan Antonin Bat'à (founder of Zlin Aviation), the Tomáš Baťa aviation, apparently the world's First one to regularly use aircraft for expedient transport of not only high-echelon staff, but in case of need also e. g. skilled workers to places where their skills were needed soon – so the primary aim was the timely deployment of manpower to the spot where it was needed, not creating luxurious "royal barges" for a few chosen.
  • 1929 – First flight of The Dornier Do X, German flying boat, semi-cantilever monoplane powered by twelve engines mounted in six tower nacelles on the wing.
  • 1928 – Emilio Carranza crashes in the New Jersey Pine Barrens while returning from New York City to Mexico City on a historic goodwill flight.
  • 1921 – Death of Harry George Hawker MBE, AFC, Australian aviation pioneer and co-founder of Hawker Aircraft, when his Nieuport Goshawk crashed while he was climbing out from Hendon Aerodrome while practicing for an airshow.
  • 1917 – Royal Naval Air Service Flight Lieutenant O. A. Butcher, manning a kite balloon lofted by the destroyer HMS Patriot off the Shetland Islands, sights the German submarine U-69 at a range of 28 nautical miles (52 km), allowing Patriot to intercept U-69 and sink her with depth charges.
  • 1916 – The United States Navy armored cruiser North Carolina becomes the first ship to launch an aircraft by catapult while underway, launching a Curtiss flying boat piloted by Lieutenant Godfrey Chevalier.
  • 1910 – Death of Charles Stewart Rolls, British motoring and aviation pioneer, First Briton to be killed in a flying accident, when the tail of his Wright Flyer broke off during a flying display near Bournemouth, England. Together with Frederick Henry Royce he co-founded the Rolls-Royce car company.
  • 1901 – Alberto Santos-Dumont, making an attempt on the Deutsch prize in Paris, lands his dirigible No.5 in the Trocadero gardens after one of the cords controlling the rudder snaps. He uses a ladder to repair the machine where it lies before taking off again.
  • 1895 – Birth of Geoffrey Forrest Hughes, Australian WWI flying ace.
  • 1882 – Birth of Charles Voisin, early French aviation pioneer, younger brother of Gabriel Voisin.
  • 1849 (July 12 and July 25) – Balloons (Montgolfières) are used for bombardment for the first time, with Austrians bombing Venice.
  • 1812 – Lamp gas used to fill a Montgolfière (Green).
  • 1785 – First manned flight by gas balloon in Netherlands.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NTC Minister Opens Western Nafusa Mountains Air Link". Libya TV. 12 July 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 

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July 13

  • 2009Southwest Airlines Flight 2294, a Boeing 737-300 from Nashville to Baltimore makes an emergency landing in Charleston, West Virginia after a 14x17 inch hole opens in the skin of the fuselage at 34,000 feet (10,000 m), causing a loss of cabin pressure; the plane lands safely with no injuries.
  • 2008 – (13-19) 18th FAI World Precision Flying Championship
  • 2006 – A Royal Air Force BAE Harrier II GR.9 crashes after the pilot ejects near Kidlington in Oxfordshire in the United Kingdom.
  • 2006 – AH-64D Apache from 4–4th Aviation Regiment shot down south of Baghdad. The two pilots survive.[2]
  • 1995 – Launch: Space Shuttle Discovery STS-70 at 9:41:55.078 a.m. EDT. Mission highlights: TDRS-G/IUS deployed.
  • 1992 – First flight of the 3I Sky Arrow, Italian 2 tandem seat, pusher configuration, high wing and carbon fibre light aircraft.
  • 1992 – McDonnell-Douglas F-15C-40-MC Eagle. 85-0116, c/n 0972/C358, of the 60th Fighter Squadron, 33rd Fighter Wing, based at Eglin AFB, Florida, crashes at 0900 hrs. in the Gulf of Mexico, 90 miles S of Eglin. Capt. Darren S. Ruhnau, 27, of Niceville, Florida, assigned to the 60th Fighter Squadron, ejects safely. He and another F-15 had departed Eglin at 0835 hrs. for a training mission. "I'm just glad the ACES II ejection system worked as advertised", Ruhnau said in a statement, "and that the search-and-rescue guys were there to do the job." "He was picked up by an oil freighter", said Capt. Susan Brown, a spokeswoman for the 33rd, but the helicopter crew "couldn't get him off there. So they transferred him to a Coast Guard cutter, but they couldn't get him off there either. He was in such good shape, they dropped him back in the water, and picked him up from there." A U.S. Navy helicopter of HC-16 from the USS Forrestal, which is based in Pensacola, plucked him from the Gulf at ~1000 hrs. and transported him to Eglin Regional Hospital where he was checked out and released at ~1330 hrs. Ruhnau has been flying F-15s since May 1989 and assigned at Eglin since September of that year. In an unrelated incident, another 33rd Fighter Wing F-15 makes a rough landing, overshoots the runway at Eglin and comes to a stop in the grass. The pilot, assigned to the 59th Fighter Squadron, does not eject and is uninjured, the fighter sustains less than $10,000 damage, said Brown.
  • 1988 – Death of Edward Rochfort Grange, Canadian WWI flying ace credited with five aerial victories. His postwar career included success as a businessman, and a return to aviation as a civilian inspector and auditor for the Royal Canadian Air Force during WWII
  • 1988 – US Marine Corps McDonnell-Douglas AV-8B-3 Harrier II, BuNo 161582, c/n 512014/14, of VMAT-203, crashes at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina.
  • 1986 – First flight of the PZL-130 T Turbo Orlik, Polish turboprop, single engine, two seat trainer, export version with a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6 A-25 A turboprop.
  • 1985 – Blue Angels Aircraft 5, BuNo 155029, and 6, BuNo 154992, (Douglas A-4F Skyhawk) collide at the top of a loop at 1532 hrs., Niagara Falls International Airport, New York, during the Western New York Air Show '85, killing Lt. Cmdr. Michael Gershon. Second pilot, Lt. Andy Caputi, ejects safely with only minor injuries. One Skyhawk crashed on airport grounds while the second fighter impacted in a nearby auto junkyard. The demonstration team resumes show duties 20 July at Dayton, Ohio but omits maneuver that resulted in crash, and flies with five planes rather than six.
  • 1982 – United States Navy Reserve Lieutenant Commander Barbara Allen Rainey dies in the crash of a T-34 C Mentor trainer aircraft at Middleton Field near Evergreen, Alabama, during a training flight. In February 1974, as Barbara Ann Allen, she had become the first female aviator in the United States Armed Forces.
  • 1982 – A United States Marine Corps F-4J flew into the ground close to Yuma MCAS, Arizona, both crew killed.
  • 1982 – A United States Navy F-4S of VMFA-251 crashed into the Atlantic.
  • 1977 – Death of Count Carl Gustaf Ericsson von Rosen, Swedish pioneer aviator, killed during a sudden Somali guerrilla attack near Gode. He flew relief missions in a number of conflicts as well as combat missions for Finland and Biafran rebels.
  • 1969 – Launch of Luna 15 (Ye-8-5 series), Soviet unmanned space mission to the moon also called Lunik 15.
  • 1957 – President Eisenhower becomes the first U. S. president to fly in a helicopter when he is flown from the White House to an unnamed military post in a USAF Bell UH-13 J yesterday.
  • 1956 – USAF Douglas C-118A Liftmaster, 53-3301, c/n 44671, encountered windshear after takeoff, lost altitude and crashed in forest near Fort Dix, 46 killed, 20 survivors.
  • 1950 – The first flight of the Orenda engine on a Lancaster test bed at Malton.
  • 1950 – AA USAF Boeing B-50D-110-BO Superfortress, 49-267, of the 97th Bomb Wing out of Biggs AFB, Texas, carrying a nuclear weapon bomb casing (but no fuel capsule), stalls at 7,000 feet (2,100 m) at about 1454 hrs. EST, crashes between Lebanon and Mason, Ohio, killing four officers and twelve airmen. No radio communication was received before the crash, and although all crew wore parachutes, none bailed out. HE in bomb casing explodes on impact leaving crater 200X25 feet, explosion heard for 25 miles (40 km). One account states that the weather was clear, but Joe Baugher reports that bomber was in a storm system.
  • 1945 – A US Army Air Forces Douglas A-26C Invader, 44-35553, on a training flight has mid-air collision with Eastern Airlines Flight 45 from Washington, D.C. to Columbia, South Carolina, a Douglas DC-3, NC25647',' at ~3100 feet, 11.9 miles WNW of Florence, South Carolina at 1436 hrs. A-26 vertical fin strikes port wing of airliner, displaces engine of DC-3 which cuts into fuselage; A-26 tail sheared off, two crew parachute, one KWF. DC-3 pilot belly lands in cornfield, one passenger of 24 total on board killed.
  • 1945 – 517 B-29 s drop 3,640 tons (3,302,186 kg) of bombs on Utsunomiya and other cities in Japan.
  • 1943 – An Axis air attack destroys a Liberty ship off Sicily.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) Allied transport aircraft carrying paratroopers from North Africa to Sicily again fly low in darkness over Allied ships and ground forces, and again come under friendly fire. Several are shot down. In Operation Fustian, the British Army’s First Parachute Brigade land in gliders and capture the Primosole bridge, but a German parachute battalion that previously had landed nearby drives the British off the bridge by the following evening
  • 1943 – (Overnight) – Royal Air Force Bomber Command flies the last raid of its “Battle of the Ruhr” campaign against the Ruhr region of Germany. Since the campaign began in March, Bomber Command has flown 29 major attacks against the Ruhr and the Rheinland, including five against Essen – which alone suffers 1,037 dead, 3,500 severely injured, and 4,830 homes destroyed – Four each against Duisburg and Cologne, three against Bochum, and one or two each against other cities. Bomber Command has lost 672 aircraft during the Ruhr and Rheinland raids, a 4.8 percent loss rate, and 4,400 aviators. Separately, during same period Bomber Command also has flown 18 major attacks against other targets in France, in Italy, and in Germany outside the Ruhr and Rheinland, including two raids on Berlin and strikes against Munich, Stettin, Turin, La Spezia, and the Škoda Works in Pilsen.
  • 1929 – The Polish aviator Ludwik Idzikowski crashes in the Azores and dies in an attempt of a westbound transatlantic flight.
  • 1928 – An Imperial Airways Vickers Vulcan crashes on a test flight from Croydon Airport with a pilot and five passengers near Purley, Surrey, 3 miles (4.8 km) from the airport, with the loss of four passengers. As a result of the crash Imperial Airways stopped the flying of staff (so-called joy rides) on test flights
  • 1919 – The British military airship R.34, operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF), accomplishes the first two-way transatlantic air crossing. The outward journey is also the first air crossing of the Atlantic from east to west.
  • 1915 – Birth of David Lee "Tex" Hill, American WWII fighter ace and Korean War fighter pilot. One of the First pilots of First American Volunteer Group (better known by its later nickname of the Flying Tigers)
  • 1914 – Birth of Franz Xaver von Werra, German WWII fighter ace who was shot down over England and captured. He is generally regarded as the only Axis prisoner of war to succeed in escaping from a Canadian prisoner of war camp and returning to Germany.
  • 1913 – Léon Letort carries out the First non-stop flight between Paris and Berlin when he flies his Morane-Saulnier monoplane fitted with an 80-hp Le Rhône engine the 590 miles between the two capitals.
  • 1910 – Death of Oskar Erbslöh, German aviation pioneer, in the crash of his Airship 'Erbslöh'
  • 1909 – If brief hops by Alliott Verdon Roe on June 8, 1908 are discounted, the first flight made by an Englishman in an English airplane takes place when Roe flies his Roe I triplane for the first time at Lea Marsches in Essex. He flies only 100 ft., but on July 23 he extends the distance to some 900 ft. off the ground.
  • 1897: Salomon August Andrée, Nils Strindberg and Knut Frænkel lands their hydrogen balloon 'Eagle' in the Arctic.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reuters, "19 Suspected Militants Killed in Airstrikes," The Washington Post, July 15, 2013, p. A7.
  2. ^ "US Army Soldiers Survive Helicopter Crash in Iraq". 6abc.com. 2006-06-13. Retrieved 2007-11-29. 

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July 14

  • 2013Pakistan Air Force jets bomb at least seven Islamist militant hideouts in Pakistan, killing at least 17 insurgents and injuring at least 13.[1]
  • 2009 – Airfast Indonesia, Garuda Indonesia, Mandala Airlines and Premiair are removed from the European Commission blacklist.
  • 2009 – American airline Pet Airways commences operations.
  • 2007 – An OH-58 Kiowa 95-0002 crashes into power lines in Mosul, killing the pilot and injuring the copilot.[2]
  • 2004 – (14-20) The 14th FAI World Rally Flying Championship in Herning, Denmark. Individual winners: 1. Jiří Filip & Michal Filip (Czech), 2. František Cihlář & Milos Fiala (Czech), 3. Krzysztof Wieczorek & Krzysztof Skrętowicz (Poland); team winners: 1. Czech Republic, 2. Poland, 3. France.
  • 1996 – NATO Boeing E-3B Sentry AWACS, LX-N90457, c/n 22852, ex-79-0457, overruns runway into sea on take-off from Preveza AFB, Preveza, Greece. Fuselage breaks in two, but no casualties among crew of 16. Aircraft had rolled out at Boeing Renton, Washington plant on 21 April 1984, first flown 5 June 1984. Delivered to NATO on 19 December 1984 after AEW suite fitted out by Dornier.
  • 1982 – First flight of the Harbin Y-12, Chinese high wing twin-engine turboprop utility aircraft.
  • 1960 – Lockheed U-2A, 56-6720, Article 387, the 27th airframe of the first USAF production batch, delivered in October 1957 and assigned to the 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Laughlin AFB, Texas, as a "ferret" aircraft, crashes this date in the early morning ~30 miles NE of Laughlin. Pilot Maj. Raleigh Myers experiences an oxygen fire in the cockpit after a pressure-reducing switch fails, ignited by the 24-volt power supply line to the switch. He bails out at 24,000 feet (7,300 m), escaping safely. The oxygen supply system is subsequently redesigned.
  • 1959 – Maj V Ilyushin sets a new altitude record of 28,852 m (94,659 ft) in the Sukhoi T-431
  • 1955 – Vought F7U-3 Cutlass, BuNo 129595, 'D 412', of VF-124, suffers ramp strike on landing aboard USS Hancock during carrier qualifications off of the California coast, disintegrating airframe spins off portside; pilot LCDR Jay Alkire, USNR, executive officer of VF-124, killed when airframe sinks, still strapped into ejection seat; also killed are two boatswain's mates, one photographers mate, in port catwalk by burning fuel. Dramatic footage shot from port catwalk exists showing burning fighter going over the side. Footage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CT670dAzfo
  • 1954 – First prototype Handley Page Victor bomber, WB771, is lost when the tailplane detaches while making a low-level pass over the runway at Cranfield, causing the aircraft to crash with the loss of the crew. Attached to the fin using three bolts, the tailplane was subject to considerably more stress than had been anticipated and the three bolts failed due to metal fatigue.
  • 1949 – A Fairchild C-82A-15-FA Packet, 44-23014, c/n 10058, crashes into a parking lot in Area B of Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. While conducting routine drop testing in Area C of the base, the C-82 attempted an emergency landing in Area B. With its electrical system down and the right engine on fire, the plane landed ~three-quarters down the runway, running off the end of the runway across a grassy area, plowing through a steel fence, and ran over a number of cars in the main parking lot near Highway 4 before flipping onto its back. Firecrews were on the scene immediately. The only person killed was MSgt Lubitz, Flight Test Division, who jumped from the plane just before it hit the fence. The other four crew were only slightly injured and no one on the ground was hurt.
  • 1948 – First flight of The Supermarine Seagull ASR-1, British amphibious prototype, military flying boat and last to be built by the Supermarine company.
  • 1945 – Task Force 38 carrier aircraft fly 1,391 sorties against targets in northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan, without any Japanese air opposition. They destroy 25 Japanese aircraft, sink three destroyers, eight naval auxiliaries, and 20 merchant ships, and damage a destroyer, three escort craft, and 21 merchant ships.
  • 1944 – (14–15) Saipan-based U. S. Navy PB4Y-1 Liberators of Bomber Squadron 109 (VB-109) raid Iwo Jima, Chichi Jima, and Haha Jima.
  • 1944 – United States Army Air Forces Chief of Staff General Henry H. “Hap” Arnold recommends to joint planners that the United States capture the island of Iwo Jima to provide an emergency landing strip for B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers and a base for P-51 Mustang fighters for the strategic bombing campaign against Japan.
  • 1940 – In retaliation for the British attacks at Mers-el-Kébir and Dakar, French bombers again attack Gibraltar, but most of their bombs fall into the sea.
  • 1937Mikhail Gromov, A. B. Yumashev and S. A. Danilin established a new non-stop flight distance record of 10,148 km (6,306 mi) from Moscow to San Jacinto, California, U. S., via the North Pole in a Tupolev ANT-25.
  • 1936 – The British Royal Air Force is re-organised on functional grounds and RAF Fighter Command, RAF Bomber Command, RAF Coastal Command, and RAF Training Command are established.
  • 1934 – Howard Hughes lands in New York after a record-breaking 14,874-mile trip round the Northern Hemisphere with a Lockheed Electra 14 in 3 days 19 hours.
  • 1922 – Birth of Robin Olds, American fighter pilot and general officer in the U. S. Air Force. He was a "triple ace", with a combined total of 16 victories in WWII and the Vietnam War.
  • 1919 – To protest against the fact that pilots have to parade on foot at the World War I victory parade on the Champs-Elysées in Paris, French pilot Charles Godefroy flies his Nieuport fighter under the arches of the Arc de Triomphe.
  • 1918 – Serving as a fighter pilot in the United States Army Air Service’s 95th Aero Squadron, Second Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, the youngest son of former U. S. President Theodore Roosevelt, is shot down and killed at Chamery, France, by a German fighter while flying a Nieuport 28.
  • 1917 – Death of Thomas (Tom) Wesley Benoist, American aviation pioneer who started the First scheduled aircraft service, founder of Benoist Aircraft Co.
  • 1916 – First flight of The Bristol M.1 Monoplane Scout, British WWI monoplane fighter.
  • 1915 – Death of Lawrence Hargrave, British engineer, explorer, astronomer, inventor and aeronautical pioneer.
  • 1913 – First flight of the Cody Floatplane (also referred to as the Cody Hydro-biplane) was designed and built as an entrant in the 1913 Daily Mail Circuit of Britain race.
  • 1913 – Death of Léonce Bertin, French aircraft designer, killed with his son René in the crash of his Bertin Monoplane.
  • 1914 – Dr. Robert H. Goddard is granted a patent for his liquid fuel rocket engine.
  • 1905 – Orville Wright has a serious crash with Wright Flyer III, upon which the Wright Brothers radically alter the aircraft. The front rudder is mainly the culprit for the Flyer’s insistent pitching.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reuters, "19 Suspected Militants Killed in Airstrikes," The Washington Post, July 15, 2013, p. A7.
  2. ^ Michael Gilbert (2007-07-06). "Fort Lewis soldier dies in copter crash". The News Tribune. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-07-07. 

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July 15

  • 2009 – Launch: Space Shuttle Endeavour STS-127 at 22:03 UTC. Mission highlights: ISS assembly flight 2J/A: JEM Exposed Facility (EF) & JEM ELM ES.
  • 2009 – A Republic of China Air Force Northrop F-5F (5410) from the 7th Tactical Fighter Group based at Ching Chuan Kang Air Base crashes on a routine training flight of the coast of Penghu, Taiwan killing the 2 crew.
  • 1996 – The Herculesramp (Dutch for ‘Hercules disaster’) is an aviation accident that occurred at Eindhoven Airport. The disaster involving a Belgian C-130 Hercules aircraft took the lives of 34 passengers.
  • 1996 – At approximately 1803 hrs., a Belgian Lockheed C-130H Hercules, CH-06, c/n 4473, at Eindhoven Air Base in the Netherlands after bird strikes stopped three engines. A total of 34 people lost their lives as a result of the accident, and seven people were seriously injured.
  • 1983 – Orly Airport attack was the 15 July 1983 bombing of a Turkish Airlines check-in counter at Orly Airport in Paris, France, by the Armenian militant organization ASALA as part of its campaign for the recognition of and reparations for the Armenian Genocide. The explosion killed eight people and injured 55.
  • 1975 – The first international manned space flight occurs between the Soviet Soyuz 19 and an Apollo spacecraft.
  • 1970 – The Tupolev Tu-144 exceeds Mach 2 in level flight, the first commercial aircraft to do so in a flight on 26 May 1970.[1]
  • 1968 – The first direct airline service between the Soviet Union and the U. S. is inaugurated, ten years after negotiations began.
  • 1964 – A Soviet Tupolev Tu-16R "Badger" crashes in the Sea of Japan. In April 1995, during working group sessions, the U.S. side passed over the deck logs of the USS Bennington from 1 July 1964 to 31 July 1964, the deck log of the USS Cunningham from 14 July 1964 to 16 July 1964 and the deck log of the USS Eversole from 14 July 1964 to 16 July 1964. These deck logs all pertain to the crash of the "Badger".
  • 1963 – Two North American F-100 Super Sabres of the 492d Tactical Fighter Squadron, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, based at RAF Lakenheath, Suffolk, suffer mid-air collision during routine gunnery exercise on the Holbeach Range, both aircraft coming down in the sea five miles off King's Lynn. Pilot 1st Lt. L. C. Marshall parachuted from North American F-100D-45-NH, 55-2792, c/n 224-59, rescued from his dinghy by helicopter, but 1st Lt. D. F. Ware rode 55-2786 to his death.
  • 1958 – First full transition from vertical flight to horizontal flight of The Vertol VZ-2 (or Model 76), US research aircraft built to investigate the tiltwing approach to vertical take-off and landing. The aircraft had a fuselage of tubular framework (originally uncovered) and accommodation for its pilot in a helicopter-like bubble canopy. The T-tail incorporated small ducted fans to act as thrusters for greater control at low speeds.
  • 1954 – The Boeing 707 prototype, the model 367-80, made its maiden flight from Renton Field, south of Seattle on 20 Dec 1957.[2]
  • 1953 – First of two Convair XP5Y-1s (and only one to fly), BuNo 121455, is lost on 42nd flight during high-speed testing by pilot Don Germeraad over the Pacific near San Diego, California. While operating at 115 percent of design limits under Navy contract, the elevator torque tube breaks, aircraft commences cycle of rollercoaster climbs and dives which continues for 25 minutes until control obviously being lost, all eleven on board go over the side and are rescued. Flying boat crashes into the ocean and sinks ~six miles off Point Loma, wreckage never recovered. A chase plane awaiting a Convair F2Y Sea Dart filmed the final minutes of the hair-raising flight, but it was classified secret and has probably never been released. Airframe had over 102 hours of flight time. When first flown on 18 April 1950, it was the first turboprop-powered flying boat to fly.
  • 1945 – In a second day of air strikes on northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Task Force 38 aircraft completely disrupt the Aomori-Hakodate train ferry system and sink numerous colliers, reducing the Japanese coal-carrying capacity by 50 percent.
  • 1945 – The 2nd TAF was reformed as the British Air Force of Occupation, Germany.
  • 1942 – The first supply flight from India to China over the ‘Hump’ is flown.
  • 1942 – During Operation Bolero, the ferrying of combat aircraft from the U.S. to England by air, a flight of two Boeing B-17E-BO Flying Fortress bombers, 41-9101, c/n 2573, "Big Stoop", and 41-9105, c/n 2577, "Do-Do", of the 97th Bomb Group and six P-38F Lightnings of the 94th Fighter Squadron, 1st Fighter Group, on the 845-mile (1,360 km) leg between Bluie West 8 airfield and Reykjavík, Iceland, run out of fuel after being held up by bad weather, and all force-land on the Greenland icecap. All safely belly in except for the first P-38 which attempts a wheels-down landing, flipping over as nosewheel catches a crevasse, but pilot Lt. Brad McManus unhurt. All crews rescued on 19 July, but aircraft are abandoned in place. One P-38F-1-LO, 41-7630, c/n 222-5757, now known as "Glacier Girl", recovered in 1992 from under 200 feet (61 m) of accumulated snow and ice and rebuilt to flying status, registered N17630. One Boeing B-17 ("Big Stoop") also found, but it is too badly crushed for recovery. Although the USAAF had expected to lose 10 percent of the 920 planes that made the North Atlantic transit during Bolero, losses were only 5.2 percent, the majority being involved in this single incident.
  • 1942 – The Republic of China Air Force’s American Volunteer Group – The “Flying Tigers” – Is transferred to the United States Army Air Forces, in which it becomes the 23rd Fighter Group. In its six months of Chinese service, the unit has shot down 286 Japanese aircraft in exchange for 12 of its own lost in air-to-air combat.
  • 1941 – Luftwaffe ace Werner Mölders shoots down two Soviet aircraft, raising his victory total to 101. He becomes the first pilot to claim 100 victories.
  • 1939 – Clara Adams (NYC) is first woman to complete round world flight.
  • 1938 – First flight of The production model Dornier Do 22/See, German three-seat, parasol wing monoplane, single-engined military floatplane.
  • 1938 – A German Arado Ar 79 training and touring aircraft sets an international solo speed record over a 1,000-km (621.4-statute mile) course for an aircraft of its class, averaging 229.04 km/hr (142.32 mph).
  • 1933 – Wiley Post began First solo flight around world in a Lockheed Vega, Winnie Mae.
  • 1929 – First airport hotel opens-Oakland Ca.
  • 1927 – First flight of The Bristol Bagshot, also known as the Type 95, heavily-armed British fighter prototype.
  • 1927 – Death of Paul Wilhelm Bäumer, German WWI fighter ace, killed in a crash near Copenhagen while test flying a Rohrbach Rofix fighter.
  • 1925 – Dr. A. Hamilton Rice’s expedition to the Amazon to explore the headwaters of the Amazon, the first exploration by airplane, returns safely.
  • 1923 – Dobrolet, the Soviet state airline, opens its first scheduled domestic service, between Moscow and Nizhniy Novgorod.
  • 1919Royal Navy North Sea class airship N.S.11 burns over the North Sea off Norfolk, England, killing twelve. In the early hours of 15 July on what was officially supposed to be a mine-hunting patrol, she was seen to fly beneath a long "greasy black cloud" off Cley next the Sea on the Norfolk coast and a massive explosion was heard shortly after. A vivid glare lasted for a few minutes as the burning airship descended, and finally plunged into the sea after a second explosion. There were no survivors, and the findings of the official Court of Enquiry were inconclusive, but amongst other possibilities it was thought that a lightning strike may have caused the explosion.
  • 1916 – William Boeing founds the Pacific Aero Products Company. In 1917 it will be renamed Boeing Airplane Company.
  • 1784 – First steerable balloon (also known as a dirigible, modern term “airship”). The Robert brothers (Les Frères Robert) flew for 45 min from Saint-Cloud to Meudon with M. Collin-Hullin and Louis Philippe II, the Duke of Chartres in their elongated balloon. The steerable craft designed by professor Jacques Charles followed Jean Baptiste Meusnier‘s proposals (1783–85) for a dirigible balloon, with a rudder, but the use of oars as a means of propulsion was not successful.

References[edit]

Edit today's anniversaries

July 16

  • 2011 – Launch of GPS IIF-2, GPS satellite.
  • 2009 – N350AN, a Boeing 767-323ER operated by American Airlines, is substantially damaged when the nosewheel collapses on the ground at Fort Worth Alliance Airport, United States, during post-maintenance checks.
  • 2009 – A Pakistan Air Force Lockheed Martin F-16A Block 15AQ OCU Fighting Falcon, 92729, ex-92-0405, on a routine night training exercise from No. 9 Squadron from Mushaf Airbase crashes 105 km south-west of Sargodha, Pakistan resulting in the death of the pilot, Squadron Leader Saud Ghulam Nabi. Another source gives the accident date as 17 July.
  • 2007 – A US F-16, serial 92-3901, from the 35th FW crashed. The pilot survived. The crash was attributed to under-inflation of the landing gear tires.[1]
  • 2005 – An Equatorial Express Antonov An-24 crashes into a mountain side near Baney, Equatorial Guinea; all 60 on board die.
  • 2004 – Death of Major General Charles W. Sweeney, USAAF WWII pilot and the pilot who flew the "Fat Man" atomic bomb to Nagasaki.
  • 2002 – Bristow Helicopters Sikorsky S-76 A crash: G-BJVX, a commercial Sikorsky S-76 A helicopter operated by Norwich-based Bristow Helicopters, crashed in the southern North Sea while it was making a ten minute flight between the gas production platform Clipper and the drilling rig Global Santa Fe Monarch, after which it was to return to Norwich Airport. The accident caused the death of all those on board (two crew members and nine Shell workers as passengers). The body of the eleventh man has never been recovered.
  • 1999John F. Kennedy, Jr. plane crash: A Piper Saratoga piloted by John F. Kennedy, Jr. – The son of President John F. Kennedy – crashes into the Atlantic Ocean off Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, killing all three people on board: Kennedy, his wife Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, and her sister, Lauren Bessette.
  • 1989 – European air traffic is halted due to industrial action by French air traffic controllers.
  • 1986 – Launch of Soyuz T-15, Soviet manned mission to both space stations Mir and Salyut 7.
  • 1986 – The Atlas Cheetah, fighter aircraft built as a major upgrade of the Dassault Mirage III by the Atlas Aircraft Corporation (later Denel Aviation) of South Africa, is First unveiled.
  • 1969Apollo 11 blasted off from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on the first manned mission to the surface of the moon.
  • 1965 – First launch of the Proton, expendable launch system used for both commercial and Russian government space launches.
  • 1962 – NASA civilian Test pilot Joseph A Walker takes X-15 to 32,600 m.
  • 1957KLM Flight 844, a Lockheed Super Constellation, crashes after takeoff from Biak-Mokmer Airport, Indonesia, killing 58 of 68 on board.
  • 1957 – Flying a Vought F8U-1P Crusader photographic reconnaissance aircraft, United States Marine Corps Major John H. Glenn sets a North American transcontinental speed record, flying from Los Alamitos, California, to Floyd Bennett Field in New York City nonstop in 3 hours, 28 min, 50 seconds, at an average speed of 723.517 mph (1,165.084 km/hr) with three aerial refuelings.
  • 1956 – First flight of The Lavochkin La-250 "Anakonda", Soviet high-altitude interceptor aircraft prototype.
  • 1954 – Canadian fighter pilots, flying Sabre Mk.Vs, participated in Exercise “Dividend” in the skies over Great Britain to test the British air defence system.
  • 1953 – USAF Lieutenant Colonel W. F. Barnes, flying a North American F86D Sabre, sets the world's first speed record over 700mph
  • 1951 – First flight of the Iberavia I-11 EC-AFE (Or Iberavia I-11), Spanish low-wing monoplane of conventional configuration with fixed, tricycle undercarriage and a large, bubble canopy over the two side-by-side seats.
  • 1950 – Okinawa-based U. S. Navy PB4Y-2 Privateers of Patrol Squadron 28 (VP-28) begin patrols of the coast of the People’s Republic of China.
  • 1950 – Birth of Valery Yevgenyevich Maksimenko, Soviet Air Force Test Pilot.
  • 1950 – First flight of the Boisavia Chablis, French 2-seat high wing monoplane light sport aircraft prototype
  • 1948 – Catalina seaplane Miss Macao (VR-HDT), operated by a Cathay Pacific subsidiary, with 23 passengers and 3 crew on board flying from Macau to Hong Kong is hijacked mid-way over the Pearl River Delta by a group of 4 hijackers attempting to rob the passengers on board. The pilot is attacked and the aircraft loses control during the ensuing struggle in the cockpit. The subsequent crash kills all on board except one passenger, who was later identified to be the lead hijacker. This is the first known case of airliner hijack.
  • 1947 – Geoffrey Tyson test-pilots the Saunders-Roe SR.A/1 TG263, the first jet fighter to be modified as a flying boat.
  • 1945 – 471 B-29 s drop 3,678 tons (3,336,660 kg) of bombs on Numazu and other cities in Japan.
  • 1945 – First atomic weapon is successfully detonated at the Trinity test site at Alamogordo in New Mexico, USA.
  • 1944 – Royal Navy Vought Corsair I out of NAS Brunswick, Maine, is destroyed when it flies into Sebago Lake near Raymond, Maine; crew condition unknown.
  • 1943 – An Italian torpedo bomber damages the British aircraft carrier HMS Indomitable off Cape Passero, forcing her to proceed to Gibraltar for repairs.
  • 1941 – The Hillson Bi-mono, British experimental aircraft designed to test the idea of "slip-wings", where the aircraft could take off as a biplane, jettison the upper, disposable wing, and continue flying as a monoplane, successfully dropped over the Irish Sea the upper wing with no great change in trim and a few hundred feet in altitude being lost
  • 1935 – Death of Käthe Paulus, German Balloonist, aerobatic pilot and early parachute designer.
  • 1934 – Death of Kurt Wahmke, German Rocket pioneer, along with 2 technicians, when the chamber exploded during a test. First and only deaths of technicians in the history of German rocket development
  • 1930 – Birth of Francis Herbert Goldsborough, American aviator who held the junior transcontinental air speed record, dying from wounds after His plane crashed in Vermont the day before.
  • 1930 – Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA) is formed when Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express merge.
  • 1927 – Ernie Smith and Emory Bronte complete the first civilian non-stop flight from North America to the Hawaiian Islands when their Travel Air monoplane, the City of Oakland, crashes on Molokai after a flight from Oakland, California. They survive the crash.
  • 1925 – Early example of a production Fokker D.XIII is used to set four new world airspeed records: the airspeed record for carrying a 500 kg/1,102 lb payload (265.7 km/h or 165.7 mph), the record for carrying the same payload over a distance of 200 km (264.2 km/h or 164.7 mph), at the same time setting the same records for carrying a 250 kg (551 lb) payload.
  • 1922 – At Hampton Roads, Virginia, the United States Navy’s only balloon ship, the lighter-than-air craft tender USS Wright (AZ-1), flies her balloon for the last time. She soon is rebuilt as a seaplane tender (AV-1) with no balloon capability.
  • 1921 – First flight of the Avro 552, a British light biplane aircraft, Evolution of the AVro 504.
  • 1921 – Cambridge wins the first air race between Oxford and Cambridge universities, using S. E. 5 as. airplanes.
  • 1918 – Death of Awdry Morris "Bunny" Vaucour, British WWI flying ace, Killed in a "friendly fire" incident, when an Italian Hanriot pilot shot his Sopwith Camel.
  • 1918 – Death of Hans Kirschstein, German WWI fighter ace, killed in a crash on a return flight from Fismes in a Hannover CL.II piloted by Leutnant Johannes Markgraf
  • 1918 – Death of Lionel Arthur Ashfield, British WWI flying ace, killed in his Airco de Havilland DH.4 along with his Observer, Irish Maurice Graham English.
  • 1912 – Naval torpedo launched from an airplane patents by B A Fiske.
  • 1911 – The LZ 10 Schwaben enters commercial service. It will go on to become the first commercially successful passenger aircraft.
  • 1910 – First flight of The Duigan pusher biplane (or often simply the Duigan biplane), unnamed early aircraft which made the First powered flight by an Australian-designed and -built machine.
  • 1892] – Birth of Michel Joseph Callixte Marie Coiffard, French WWI fighter ace
  • 1878 – Birth of Aldo Corazza, Italian aviation pioneer and early aircraft designer.

References[edit]

Edit today's anniversaries

July 17

  • 2009 – A Fuerza Aérea Venezolana Cessna T206H (FAV-2807) flying from Puerto Ayacucho to La Esmeralda, Estado Amazonas, Venezuela crashes into the hillside of El Duida, 20 miles (32 km) from its destination at La Esmeralda airport killing the 3 crew.
  • 2009 – An MD-530F contracted to Xe (formerly Blackwater) crashes at Butler Range outside Baghdad. Two pilots died. The cause was not known.[2][3]
  • 2006STS-121 space shuttle 'Discovery' mission to the International Space Station (ISS) is back on earth
  • 2001 – At ~0700 hrs., pilot Maj. Aaron George of the 416th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base, California, and Judson Brohmer of Tehachapi, California, an aerial photographer under contract to the Air Force Flight Test Center, are killed in the crash of an Edwards based Lockheed Martin F-16B Block 5 Fighting Falcon, 78-0100, while on a test sortie to chase and film the launch of the Miniature Air-Launch Decoy (MALD) from a second F-16, also from the 416th Flight Test Squadron.
  • 2000Alliance Air Flight 7412, a Boeing 737-200, crashes into government housing in Patna, India as it approaches the airport, killing 55 of the 58 on board and five people on the ground.
  • 1997STS-94, Space Shuttle Columbia mission, is back on earth.
  • 1996TWA Flight 800, a Boeing 747, explodes in mid-air above the ocean off East Moriches, New York, killing all 230 people on board.
  • 1991 – Death of Arthur Raymond "Ray" Brooks, American WWI flying ace, pioneer in the development of radio navigational aids (NAVAIDs) and one of the earliest commercial pilots involved with carrying mail (air mail) for the US Post Office Department.
  • 1984 – Two airships are seen over London for the first time since the WWI when British Airship Industries fly their Skyship 600 and Skyship 500 models on a round trip between Cardington in Bedfordshire and Tower Bridge.
  • 1984 – Launch of Soyuz T-12 (also known as Salyut 7 EP-4), 7 th manned spaceflight to the Soviet space station Salyut 7.
  • 1978 – First flight of the Soko G-4 Super Galeb, Yugoslav single engine, advanced jet trainer/light strike aircraft.
  • 1975 – American Apollo capsule links up to a Russian Soyuz capsule in orbit, marking the first space collaboration between the two nations. It would also be the last Apollo mission, as well as the last manned mission for six years until the launch of the first Space Shuttle in 1981.
  • 1953 – Lieutenant Guy P. Bordelon scores his fifth aerial victory, becoming the United States Navy’s only ace of the Korean War. He had scored all five victories since June 29, using an F4U-5 N Corsair night fighter to shoot down North Korean light aircraft making night harassment raids.
  • 1953 – US Marine Corps Fairchild R4Q-2 Packet, BuNo 131663, c/n 10830, crashes in a wooded area N of Milton, Florida, shortly after take off from NAS Whiting Field, Florida, where it had made a refueling stop. Five of six crew, and 39 of 40 passengers are killed. The transport was one of 20 being used to take Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps midshipmen, college students, in their sophomore and junior years and from many states, from NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, to Chambers Field, NAS Norfolk, Virginia. All 46 passengers were ROTC members. "As part of their reserve work they are required to take six weeks summer training at naval installations in Corpus Christi and Norfolk. Altogether, 1,600 ROTC men are taking part in this summer's program, half of them at Corpus Christi and half at Norfolk. At the end of three weeks, the 800 at Norfolk and 800 at Corpus Christi swap bases for the final three weeks. The group which had stopped at Whiting was half of the 800 being flown to Norfolk. Rear Adm. J. P. Whitney, chief of Naval Air Basic Training, appointed a special board to investigate the crash." Most of the dead were students at the University of Oklahoma and Rice University, with one victim from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
  • 1952 – 58 Republic F84 Thunderjets complete a trans-ocean flight of 10,895 miles, with seven stops, from Georgia in the USA to Yokota in Japan.
  • 1948Miss Macao, a Catalina seaplane operated by a Cathay Pacific subsidiary, over the Pearl River delta from Macau to Hong Kong, is hijacked with 23 passengers and three crew on board by a group attempting to rob the passengers; following a struggle in the cockpit, a crash kills all on board except one passenger, later identified as the lead hijacker; this is the earliest known airliner hijacking.
  • 1944 – In Operation Mascot, the British aircraft carriers HMS Formidable, HMS Furious, and HMS Indefatigable launch a raid by 44 Fairey Barracuda bombers escorted by 48 fighters against the German battleship Tirpitz at her anchorage in Norway, but a highly effective German smoke screen allows them to achieve only one near-miss.
  • 1943 – 223 U. S. Air Solomons (AirSols) aircraft strike Bougainville Island, bombing Kahili Airfield and Tonolei harbor. They sink one Japanese destroyer.
  • 1943 – Death of Jean Tulasne, French WWII flying ace, shot down in his Yak-1 M by a FW-190 near Orel in Russia.
  • 1943 – Axis air attacks damage Allied shipping off Sicily.
  • 1938 – (17-18) After filing a flight plan to fly nonstop from Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn, New York, west to California, Douglas Corrigan instead heads east after takeoff and makes a 28-hour 13-minute solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean to Ireland, claiming to have made a gross navigational error. He goes down in history as “Wrong Way” Corrigan.
  • 1936 – The Spanish Civil War breaks out, and the Republican (loyalist) and Nationalist (rebel) factions seize portions of the Spanish Air Force and of the aviation force of the Spanish Navy. The Republicans end up with about 200 serviceable aircraft – Including all the fighters – And 150 pilots, which form the basis of their Spanish Republican Air Force, while the Nationalists control less than 100 serviceable aircraft and 90 pilots, which form the basis for their National Aviation.
  • 1936 – French Bloch MB.150.01 fighter prototype suffers damage to tailwheel as it taxies from the hangar at Villacoublay to inaugurate its flight test program. Returned to the factory at Courbevoie for repairs which, inexplicably, take ten months to accomplish. Poor ground handling of design, as well as unsuitability for mass-production, forces total reworking of the type, the new version being designated the Bloch MB.151, and developmentally, the Bloch MB.152.
  • 1933 – Lituanica was an Bellanca CH-300 Pacemaker airplane flown from the United States across the Atlantic Ocean by Lithuanian-American pilots Steponas Darius and Stasys Girėnas in 1933. After successfully flying 6,411 km, it crashed, due to undetermined circumstances, 650 km from its destination, Kaunas, Lithuania.
  • 1929 – Robert Hutchings Goddard successfully launches a camera equipped rocket.
  • 1928 – Amelia Earhart becomes the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.
  • 1927 – Hudson Strait Expedition sailed from Halifax to conduct navigation studies in conjunction with plans to open a deep-sea harbour at Churchill, Manitoba. The equipment included seven RCAF aircraft.
  • 1926 – Death of Augustus Moore Herring, American aviation pioneer, who flew a compressed-air powered aircraft in 1898, five years before the Wright Brothers made their own powered flight. It has been claimed that he was the first aviator of a motorized heavier-than-air aircraft
  • 1918 – Death of Auguste Baux, French WWI flying ace, Killed in action in his SPAD XIII.
  • 1917 – The United States Navy establishes the Naval Aircraft Factory at League Island Navy Yard in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • 1917 – Death of Luigi Olivi, Italian WWI flying ace, killed in action in his SPAD VII.
  • 1917 – Ground is broken for the first building of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Langley Field laboratory.
  • 1914 – First flight of the Vickers F.B.5 (Fighting Biplane 5) (known as the "Gunbus"), British two-seat pusher WWI military biplane, first aircraft purpose-built for air-to-air combat to see service, making it the world's first operational fighter aircraft
  • 1913 – The Royal Navy introduces the term “seaplane; ” previously, seaplanes had been known as “hydro-aeroplanes. ”
  • 1912 – The first flight by a seaplane in Canada was at Port Stanley Ontario this date. It was also the occasion of the first passenger ride in a seaplane in Canada.
  • 1910 – Mile-High altitude record. Walter Brookins climbed 6,234′ (>6,175′) into the sky over Atlantic City, NJ in his new Wright Model A, for which he was awarded a $5,000 prize.
  • 1908 – The first aviation legislation of the United States is passed: a municipal ordinance requiring an annual license and regulating aircraft within the city limits of Kissimmee, Florida.
  • 1894 – Birth of George Cox, Australian WWI flying ace
  • 1892 – Birth of Edwin Harris Dunning, British Royal Naval Air Service, first pilot to land an aircraft on a moving ship.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Syrian tanks circle town on Iraq border as soldiers defect". The Jerusalem Post. 17 July 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Helicopter crash kills 2 in Iraq". CNN.com. 2009-07-18. Retrieved 2009-07-19. 
  3. ^ "Helicopter Crash in Iraq" (Press release). Robert Wood, Acting Spokesman, Bureau of Public Affairs. 2009-07-19. Retrieved 2010-10-17. The Department of State is deeply saddened by the deaths of two employees of Xe Consulting during a helicopter crash in Iraq on July 17 and extends our heartfelt sympathies to their families. Our thoughts are also with the two men who were injured in this incident and their families. These men played an important role in assisting the Department in protecting American diplomats and missions in Iraq. The Department’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security is coordinating with appropriate U.S. and Iraqi officials regarding an investigation into the cause of the crash. 

Edit today's anniversaries

July 18

  • 2009 – Deceased: British World War I veteran and last surviving founder member of the Royal Air Force, Henry Allingham, 113.
  • 2009 – An United States Air Force McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron, based at Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina, flying in support of ISAF coalition operations, crashes in eastern Afghanistan. The two aircrew, Capt. Thomas J. Gramith and Capt. Mark R. McDowell both die in the incident.
  • 2007 – An Antonov An-24 of Malift Air shortly after taking off from Bandundu, DRC had an engine failure, lost altitude and crashed 8 km from Bandundu. Of the 2 crew and 8 passengers, all survived.
  • 2005 – A Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet and a Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet from NAS Lemoore, California, collide over the China Lake, California, weapons testing ground. The pilot of the E is KWF, while the two crew of F eject with injuries.
  • 2002 – Airtanker crashes: C-130 Hercules and a PB4Y-2 Privateer – crashed about a month apart while performing aerial firefighting operations.
  • 1984 – Beverly Lynn Burns becomes the first female Boeing 747 airline captain, flying PEOPLExpress flight 604 from Newark to LAX. The achievement earned her extensive media attention, congratulatory honors from several local politicians – And even an invitation to President Ronald Reagan’s second inauguration. By the time she retired from Continental in 2008, she had captained the 727, 737, 747, 757, 767, 777 and DC-10.
  • 1974 – NASA buys a Boeing 747 from American Airlines, and under a $30 million contract from Rockwell International, Boeing begins modifying it into the first Shuttle Carrier Aircraft.
  • 1966 – Gemini 10, the first mission to complete a double rendezvous with other spacecraft, is launched from Cape Canaveral.
  • 1966 – A fuel tank on a Boeing B-52D Stratofortress of the 509th Bombardment Wing (Heavy) out of Pease AFB, New Hampshire, comes off and lands 4,000 feet up on Sugarloaf Mountain in Kingfield, Maine.
  • 1965 – The first Russian satellite to complete a lunar flyby, Zond 3, is launched.
  • 1960 – RCAF Douglas DC-4 Ms started the airlift of 22 tons to assist in UN operations in the Republic of the Congo.
  • 1957 – The 380th Bomb Wing suffers its first peacetime major accident when Boeing KC-97G-28-BO Stratotanker, 52-2737, c/n 16768, from the 380th Air Refueling Squadron with a crew of eight explodes and crashes into Lake Champlain at 2128 hrs. when 2 of the 4 engines fail 3 minutes after take-off from Plattsburgh AFB, New York. Three survivors.
  • 1956 – The first Boeing KC-135 rolls out from the Renton plant, followed a few minutes later by the last KC-97.
  • 1950 – AD Skyraiders and F4U Corsairs from the aircraft carrier USS Valley Forge (CV-45) strike targets near Pyongyang, Korea, then completely destroy an oil refinery at Wonsan. Aircraft from HMS Triumph provide a combat air patrol and antisubmarine patrols for Task Force 77 during the strikes.
  • 1950 – The Peruvian Aviation Corps is reorganized to become the Peruvian Air Force.
  • 1945 – Task Force 38 carrier aircraft conduct heavy strikes against targets along the shore of Tokyo Bay, concentrating on the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, where they damage the battleship Nagato and sink a submarine, a destroyer, and three smaller vessels.
  • 1945 – Consolidated TBY-2 Seawolf, BuNo 30414, overshoots runway while landing at Convair Field, Fort Worth, Texas. Two KWF.
  • 1944 – At 7.15 am on 18 July 1944 an Lancaster Mk.111 bomber belonging to 115 Squadron RAF crashed into the farm house at West End Farm (51°56′03″N 0°20′35″W) killing the crew as well as the farmer’s wife and two daughters (one of whom was home on leave from the Auxiliary Territorial Service). The aircraft LM616 (KO J) had left its base at RAF Witchford near Ely several hours earlier to support Allied ground forces taking part in Operation Goodwood during the Normandy campaign. The Royal Air Force and United States Army Air Forces objective was to bomb units of the 16th Luftwaffe Field Division and the 21st Panzer Division which were located around the Manneville area in France. LM616 received severe damage during the raid, in which its controls and navigation aids were shot up. The aircraft had descended through low cloud only to see the high escarpment of the Chiltern Hills at Offley loom into view too late for the crew to take immediate action. The aircraft hit trees in a wood on top of Birkitt Hill before the colliding with the farm house at West End Farm.
  • 1944 – Hauptman Werner Thierfelder, unit commander of Erprobungskommando 262, out of Lechfeld, is lost in crash of Me 262A-1a under unclear circumstances. Luftwaffe records indicate that he was shot down but U.S. and British records show no comparable engagement. A possible cause is that Thierfelder exceeded the airframe's limiting Mach number in a dive, perhaps while pursuing an Allied reconnaissance aircraft, leading to an irrecoverable dive.
  • 1943US Navy airship US airship K-74| is shot down by a German submarine, the only airship lost to enemy fire during World War II.
  • 1943 – Six Eleventh Air Force B-24 s make the first confirmed Allied strike against the Kurile Islands, damaging the Japanese base at Paramushiro and claiming a ship sunk without suffering any losses. It is the first time since the Doolittle Raid of April 1942 that Allied aircraft have struck the inner portions of the Japanese Empire.
  • 1941 – The first Boeing B-17 s fly into combat, serving with the British Royal Air Force on a daylight bombing raid from 30,000 feet against Wilhelmshaven, Germany.
  • 1941 – The first RAF aircraft equipped with radar
  • 1940 – First successful helicopter flight in the US, Stratford, Ct. in the Vought-Sikorsky US-300.
  • 1937 – Supporting Nationalist forces, German fighters of the Condor Legion begin to dominate the air over the Battle of Brunete, shooting down 21 Republican aircraft during the day. The Nationalists will hold the advantage in the air over central Spain for the rest of the Spanish Civil War.
  • 1919 – Riding as a passenger, Raymonde de Laroche dies along with the pilot in the crash of an experimental Caudron airplane at Le Crotoy airfield in France.
  • 1914 – The United States Congress creates an Aviation Section in the United States Army Signal Corps.
  • 1905 – Daniel Maloney makes a launch in a tandem-wing glider designed by John Montgomery at Santa Clara, California. However, a balloon cable damages the glider and upon release Maloney and the aircraft fall uncontrolled to the ground, leading to Maloney’s death.
  • 1803, Etienne Gaspar Robertson and Lhoest climb from Hamburg (Germany) up to 7,280 m in a balloon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dreamliner lands at Farnborough". BBC News. 18 July 2010. Archived from the original on 20 July 2010. Retrieved 20 July 2010. 
  2. ^ http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/nation/15070082.htm

Edit today's anniversaries

July 19

  • 2011 – A Royal Thai Army Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter crashed killing 9 people. The chopper had been sent out to recover five bodies of victims of another helicopter, a Bell UH-1 Iroquois, that had crashed two days before while looking for illegal loggers over the Tenasserim Hills in the area between Myanmar and Thailand near Phetchaburi. A third helicopter, a Bell 212, also crashed in the same area on Sunday 25 July a few miles further east close to the Kaeng Krachan reservoir killing three.
  • 2010 – A Philippine Air Force SIAI S-211 09005 crashed during a training flight in the Philippines. The crew ejected safely.
  • 2009 – Afghanistan Mil Mi-8 crash: A civilian Mil Mi-8 helicopter chartered by NATO crashed at Kandahar International Airport in southern Afghanistan killing 16 and injuring 5. The aircraft was not shot down, but rather apparently trying to take off.
  • 2009 – A Chinese Air Force Xian JH-7 (FBC-1 Flying Leopard) crashes near the Taonan tactical training base in Jilin province while on a joint counter-terrorism exercises with Russia resulting in the death of 2 crew.
  • 2005 – AH-64D Apache 02-5319 from 1–3rd Aviation Regiment crashes in Iraq, injuring the two pilots. Helicopter is written off.[1]
  • 2004 – (19-24) The 16th FAI World Precision Flying Championship in Herning, Denmark. Individual winners: Krzysztof Wieczorek (Poland) – 3Xtrim, 2. Petr Opat (Czech) – Cessna 152, 3. Wacław Wieczorek (Poland) – PZL Wilga 2000; team winners: 1. Poland, 2. Czech Republic, 3. France.
  • 2004 – near Basra, a British HC.1 Aérospatiale Puma XW221 of 33 RAF Squadron crashes, killing one crewman and injuring two others.[2]
  • 1994Alas Chiricanas Flight 00901, an Embraer EMB-110, explodes in mid-air over Panama, killing all 21 people on board. Investigators conclude that a suicide bomber caused the plane to explode, although motives and affiliation of the bomber remain unclear.
  • 1989United Airlines Flight 232, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10, suffers a complete hydraulic system failure over Iowa, United States after the tail-mounted engine disintegrates. The crew maintains partial control of the aircraft using differential throttle, bringing it to a crash landing on the runway of the Sioux City, Iowa airport. Of the 296 people on board, 111 die.
  • 1989 – A U.S. Navy McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18 Hornet from Cecil Field, NAS Jacksonville, Florida, loses a 950-pound training bomb over Waldo, Florida, in the afternoon. The ordnance narrowly misses home with four inside, bounces off tree, skips over a second home, and impacts in a field where the spotting charge explodes. No one is injured in the incident. Navy spokesman Bert Byers states that the pilot lost track of the bomb after it fell off the jet.
  • 1981 – The USS Guam, while operating 50 km SE of Morehead City, North Carolina (USA), a Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopter crashes into another CH-53 and a Bell UH-1N Twin Huey upon landing. Four crewmen die and 10 are injured.
  • 1967Piedmont Airlines Flight 22, a Boeing 727 departing from Asheville, North Carolina, crashes shortly after takeoff after a mid-air collision with a twin-engine Cessna 310 on instrument approach to Asheville; all 82 passengers and crew on both aircraft die.
  • 1962United Arab Airlines Flight 869 (1962), a de Havilland DH-106 Comet 4 C on an international scheduled flight from Hong Kong to Cairo via Bangkok, crashes into the Khao Yai mountain while descending to Bangkok; all 26 die.
  • 1961Aerolíneas Argentinas Flight 644, a Douglas DC-6, crashed a half hour after takeoff from Ministro Pistarini International Airport in Bueno Aires, Argentina. All 67 passengers and crew on board were killed.
  • 1960 – In the wake of the Congo Crisis, a Belgian Air Force (BAF) Fairchild C-119G Flying Boxcar, CP36, c/n 11083, crashes into a mountain in Rushengo near Goma after an engine caught fire. 41 died.
  • 1958 – The NATO Training Plan ended this date after having trained 5575 pilot and navigators from Euopean partners to wing standard.
  • 1947 – RAF Bristol Brigand TF.1, RH742, assigned to the A&AEE, piloted by F/L T. Morren, failed to pull out of firing pass during exercise in the Lyme Bay area off the Dorset coast, entered slow roll and lost speed while inverted, into spiral dive into sea, killing both crew. It was thought that one of the dive brakes may have failed. This was the first fatal accident in the type
  • 1945 – U. S. Army Air Forces B-29 Superfortresses strike Hitachi, Japan.
  • 1944 – 1,200+ 8th Air Force bombers bomb targets in SW Germany.
  • 1944 – Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress 42-102937 crashed at RAF Duxford, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom when attempting to buzz the airfield at too low an altitude. The aircraft clipped a hangar and crashed into a barracks block killing all thirteen on board and one person on the ground.
  • 1943 – 500 allied air forces raid Rome during WW II.
  • 1943 – Soviet Air Forces fighter pilot Yekaterina Budanova, along with Lydia Litvyak, one of only two female aces in history, is shot down and killed in a dogfight with Messerschmitt Bf 109 s over Luhansk Oblast. Although her victory total is unclear, she is commonly credited with 11 kills.
  • 1937 – The official search for missing flyers Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan was abandoned.
  • 1930 – Death of Frank Goldsborough in a crash in Vermont.
  • 1921USAAS pilot 1st Lt. Willard S. Clark is killed at Ellington Field, Texas, when his Orenco D enters a spin at low altitude and plunges to the ground. All aircraft manufactured in this batch are grounded.
  • 1920 – The Vickers R. 80 airship, designed in an innovative streamlined shape by company designer Barnes Wallis, makes its first flight.
  • 1918 – Seven Sopwith 2 F.1 Camels from the Royal Navy aircraft carrier Furious attack the Imperial German Navy airship base at Tondern, destroying the Zeppelins L 54 and L 60. It is the most successful attack by shipboard aircraft of World War I.
  • 1913 – First example of skywriting by Milton J Bryant over Seattle WA, in forming a business of aerial advertising.
  • 1912 – Winnipeg Manitoba was the sight of the first mile-high altitude flight in Canada, 6000 ft.
  • 1909 – Hubert Latham makes the first attempt to cross the English Channel. He flies 11.2 km (7 mi) from Calais in an Antoinette IV and lands in the water. He becomes the first aviator to be rescued from the English Channel when a French warship picks him up.
  • 1867 – James W. Butler and Edmund Edwards are awarded His Majesty's Patent 2115 for their delta wing jet design the Steam Dart.[3]
  • 1812, lamp gas used to fill a Montgolfière (Green).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2002 USAF Serial Numbers". Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  2. ^ "Aircraft accident to Royal Air Force Puma XW221" (PDF). Ministry of Defence. 2004-07-19. Retrieved 2009-01-30. 
  3. ^ http://www.flyingmachines.org/buted.html

Edit today's anniversaries

July 20

  • 2012 – A Royal Brunei Air Force Bell 212 crashed near Kuala Belait, Brunei killing 12 of the 14 on board.
  • 2009 – An IAI Kfir jet fighter crashes near the city of Cartagena, Colombia. The Israeli pilots operating the plane were unharmed in the incident, but the jet itself was destroyed. Israel Aerospace Industries said in a statement that the plane was flying a refresher flight, and that the aircraft did not come to a stop on the landing strip, landing outside it. The director of the Israel Aerospace Industries announced that an investigation into the incident had already begun and that a panel to probe the crash had been appointed.
  • 2009 – A Chilean Air Force Extra 300L aerobatic aircraft cashed 15 km south of Santiago, Chile, pilot seriously injured.
  • 2009 – A Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado GR.4 operating with RAF No. 1 Squadron crashes on take-off at Kandahār International Airport in Afghanistan and the two crew members successfully eject from the aircraft.
  • 2008 – (20–26) 16th FAI World Rally Flying Championship
  • 1992 – Round World Air Race begins in Paris.
  • 1992 – An Bell-Boeing MV-22 Osprey prototype, BuNo 163914, arriving from Eglin AFB, Florida, catches fire and falls into the Potomac River at MCAS Quantico, Virginia, USA, killing 5 crew members in front of an audience of high-ranking US government officials; this is the first of a series of fatal accidents involving the controversial tiltrotor aircraft.
  • 1981Somali Airlines Flight 40, a Fokker F27 Friendship, crashed shortly after takeoff from Mogadishu International Airport. All 50 passengers and crew on board were killed.
  • 1976 – America’s Viking I robot spacecraft made a successful, first-ever landing on Mars.
  • 1974 – The Turkish Air Force supports Operation Atilla, a Turkish invasion of Cyprus, as a war over the island between Turkey and Greece and the Greek Cypriots breaks out. Turkish aircraft join with Turkish Navy in sinking a Greek Cypriot torpedo boat which attempts to attack the approaching Turkish naval flotilla, and Turkish aircraft support the amphibious landing.
  • 1972 – Lockheed SR-71A, 61-7978, Article 2029, lost in landing accident at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa. Pilot Capt. Dennis K. Bush and RSO Jimmy Fagg are unhurt.
  • 1948 – Sixteen Lockheed Shooting Stars complete the first west to east transatlantic flight by jet aircraft.
  • 1945 – 473 B-29 s drop 3,255 tons (2,952,917 kg) of bombs on Fukui and other cities in Japan.
  • 1944 – Saipan-based U. S. Navy PB4Y-1 Liberators of Bomber Squadron 109 (VB-109) again strike Iwo Jima, Chichi Jima, and Haha Jima. During the strikes of July 14, 15, and 20, they claim between 10 and 30 Japanese aircraft destroyed on the ground.
  • 1944 – Flying Fortresses of US 8th Air Force attack Leipzig / Dessau.
  • 1944 – Japanese aircraft carrier Hijo sinks by US air attack.
  • 1944 – Liberators of US 8th Air Force attack Gotha Russelsheim / Eisenach.
  • 1944 – US 15th Air Force attacks Friedrichshaven Memmingen.
  • 1943 – U. S. aircraft strike the escorts of a Japanese convoy in New Georgia Sound, sinking two destroyers and damaging the heavy cruiser Kumano.
  • 1940 – The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan began operations when students started training at No. 1 Service Flying Training School at Camp Borden, Ontario.
  • 1940 – Fleet Air Arm Swordfish of No. 813 Squadron conduct another torpedo strike against Tobruk, sinking two Italian destroyers.
  • 1939 – Canada’s first North American Harvards No.’s 1321 & 1322 were delivered to RCAF Sea IsIand.
  • 1927 – Lindbergh begins NY flight (Spirit of St Louis).
  • 1908 – Orville Wright warns Glenn Curtiss that the wing flaps used in the AEA’s June Bug are an infringement of the Wrights’ patent.

References[edit]

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July 21

  • 2009 – Aeroméxico Flight 665, a Boeing 737-752, registration XA-NAM, suffers a nosewheel collapse on pushback at San Francisco International Airport. The aircraft is substantially damaged.
  • 2009 – A United States Navy Sikorsky HH-60H 163790 crashed on a training flight at Fort Pickett, Blackstone, Virginia, United States; minor injuries only.
  • 2008 – A U.S. Air Force Boeing B-52H-155-BW Stratofortress, 60-0053, c/n 464-418, "Louisiana Fire", crashed into the Pacific Ocean approximately 25 nautical miles (46 km) northwest of Apra Harbor, Guam, after taking off from Andersen Air Force Base. The aircraft was about to participate in a flyover for the Liberation Day parade in Hagåtña when it crashed at 9:45 AM ChST (2345 UTC), 15 minutes before the parade was scheduled to start. There were no survivors.
  • 2006 – (21-26) The 17th FAI World Precision Flying Championship is held in Troyes, France. Individual winners are 1. Krzysztof Wieczorek (Poland) in a 3Xtrim, 2. Janusz Darocha (Poland) in a Cessna 152, 3. Krzysztof Skrętowicz (Poland) in a 3Xtrim. Team winners are 1. Poland, 2. Czech Republic, 3. France.
  • 2004 – Two United States Marine Corps McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18 Hornets of VMFA-134, 3rd Marine Air Wing, based at MCAS Miramar, California, suffer mid-air collision over the Columbia River, 120 miles (190 km) E of Portland, Oregon, shortly after 1430 hrs., killing Marine Reservists Maj. Gary R. Fullerton, 36, of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Capt. Jeffrey L. Ross, 36, of Old Hickory, Tennessee in F/A-18B, BuNo 162870, 'MF-00', coming down in the river. Maj. Craig Barden, 38, ejects from F/A-18A, BuNo 163097, 'MF-04', landing nearby on a hillside W of Arlington, Oregon, and is taken to Mid-Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles, suffering minor injuries. All three crew eject but only two parachutes open. The fighters were on their way to the Boardman Air Force Range, where the Oregon Air National Guard trains, when they collided, said one spokesman. Another spokesman told the Associated Press that the planes were on a low-altitude training exercise.
  • 2003 – A South African registered aircraft, carrying 12 passengers and two crew, crashed into Mount Kenya: there were no survivors.[1][2]
  • 1996 – John Kevin Moorhouse, test pilot, dies at 50.
  • 1986 – Eastern Airlines submits a reorganization plan to creditors.
  • 1980 – The F-16 is officially named the Fighting Falcon in a ceremony.
  • 1977 – The Libyan-Egyptian War begins. Egyptian Air Force planes shoot down two Libyan Air Force aircraft.
  • 1976 – Canadian government announced that the Lockheed Aurora CP-140 maritime patrol aircraft would replace the Argus long-range patrol aircraft.
  • 1974 – (21 – 28) Turkish Air Force strike aircraft mistakenly attack the Turkish Navy destroyers Kocatepe, Adatepe, and Mareşal Fevzi Çakmak off Paphos, Cyprus, with 750-lb (340-kg) bombs, sinking Kocatepe with the loss of 54 lives and damaging the other two ships.
  • 1974 – (July 21 – August 12) Turkish paratroopers parachute into Cyprus to ambush a convoy carrying the Greek Cypriot commander of the Cypriot Navy, Commander Papayiannis. They wound him in an ambush, but are wiped out by his security detail.
  • 1974 – In Operation Niki, the Hellenic Air Force attempts a covert airlift of a battalion of Greek commandos from Souda, Crete, to Cyprus using 15 Noratlas aircraft. Greek Cypriot antiaircraft artillery mistakenly fires on the planes at Nicosia International Airport, shooting down one with the loss of four crew members and 29 commandos, and damages two others, but some of the commandos arrive successfully to defend the airport.
  • 1961 – First manned spacecraft to sink at sea was Gus Grissom‘s Liberty Bell 7. Grissom was saved from drowning by Navy rescue personnel.
  • 1959 – To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Louis Blériot's flight across the English Channel, the Daily Mail announces a Paris–London, or London–Paris race, on 25 May 1959. On this date, an Armee de l'Air Sud Aviation Vautour, with noted French Resistance heroine Colette Duval aboard as a passenger, touches down not at RAF Biggin Hill, but at the disused Battle of Britain airfield at RAF Kenley seven miles (11 km) away. With only an 800-yard (730 m) runway, the twin-jet bomber overruns and is damaged although both occupants escape injury.
  • 1958 – 1st Lt. Charles "Bud" Rogers has to eject from his North American F-86L Sabre, 52-10134, after it catches on fire during an engineering test flight near Walsh, Illinois. He is uninjured.
  • 19481948 Lake Mead Boeing B-29 crash: A United States Air Force Boeing B-29-100-BW Superfortress, 45-21847, modified into an Boeing F-13 Superfortress reconnaissance platform, crashes into Lake Mead, Nevada, during a classified cosmic ray research mission out of Armitage Field, Naval Air Facility, NOTS, Inyokern, California. Five crew escape unharmed before bomber sinks
  • 1946 – Aircraft North Star named.
  • 1944 – US forces land on Guam.
  • 1944 – Three US Army Air Force Douglas C-47s (42-100712, 42-92115, and 43-30664) disappear while flying at 500 feet over the Atlantic Ocean. The three aircraft lost radio contact with the squadron leader and flew into a storm.
  • 1944 – Royal Navy Vought Corsair I out of Naval Auxiliary Air Facility Lewiston, Maine, crashes in Mount Vernon woods (Cottle Hill area) following engine failure, killing Sub-Lt. Peter John Cann.
  • 1937 – Arbitrating the Royal Navy’s request that control of British naval aircraft be transferred to it from the Royal Air Force for the first time since the dissolution of the Royal Naval Air Service in 1918, Sir Thomas Inskip recommends to the British Cabinet that the Royal Navy have full control of its aircraft. His decision, which becomes known as the “Inskip Award, ” will take nearly two years to implement.
  • 1936Northrop XFT-2, BuNo 9400, (XFT-1 modified with engine change and smaller fuel capacity), to NAS Anacostia, Washington, D.C. in April 1936 for tests. Finding the design to be non-airworthy, the Navy orders that it be returned to Northrop. Ignoring instructions to ship it to Northrop's El Segundo factory, a test pilot attempts to fly the XFT-2 back to California, the aircraft entering a spin and crashing while crossing the Allegheny Mountains this date. Contract closed out in November 1936.
  • 1932 – Wolfgang von Gronau sets out to make a round-the-world trip in a Dornier Wal. One hundred and eleven days later, it will be the first such trip made in a flying boat.
  • 1930 – In the Meopham air disaster, a Walcot Air Line Junkers F.13 crashes following structural failure at Meopham, Kent, United Kingdom, killing all six on board.
  • 1921 – United States Army Air Service Martin NBS-1 bombers sink the decommissioned German battleship Ostfriesland in the Atlantic Ocean off the Virginia Capes after Billy Mitchell urges bombing trials to show the power of aircraft to sink major warships.
  • 1919 – The Wingfoot Air Express was a dirigible that crashed into the Illinois Trust and Savings Building in Chicago. The Type FD dirigible, owned by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was transporting people from Grant Park to the White City amusement park. One crew member, two passengers, and ten bank employees were killed in what was, up to that point, the worst dirigible disaster in United States history.
  • 1918 – Two United States Navy seaplanes from Naval Air Station Chatham, Chatham, Massachusetts, attack a surfaced German submarine that is firing at a tug and three barges off Cape Cod, Massachusetts. One bomb strikes the submarine, but is a dud.
  • 1911 – Pilot Denise Moore (aka Jane Wright) becomes the first woman to be killed in an airplane crash, at Étampes, France.
  • 1909 – The first international Zeppelin (airship) show is held in Frankfurt, Germany.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charter aircraft crashes into Kenya's Mount Kenya., Airline Industry Information, 21 July 2003
  2. ^ Rescue teams resume efforts to recover bodies of those killed in charter aircraft crash, Airline Industry Information, 23 July 2003

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July 22

  • 2011 – The Space Shuttle Atlantis returns to Earth at the end of STS-135, the final mission of the Space Shuttle Program.
  • 2003 – Members of the 101st Airborne, aided by a Special Forces Task Force 20, OH-58 Kiowa helicopters and USAF A-10 Warthogs, engage a home in Mosul, Iraq, eventually killing Saddam Hussein’s sons Uday and Qusay.
  • 1992 – Two soldiers from Fort Carson, Colorado, manage to avoid being killed when their U.S. Army McDonnell-Douglas AH-64 Apache crashes into the side of the north peak of 12,300-foot Almagre Mountain, known as "Mount Baldy", south of Pikes Peak. Chief Warrant Officers Douglas Mohr and David Reaves are on a routine training mission when their attack helicopter impacts several hundred feet below the crest in steep, rocky terrain. Mohr, 29, of Park City, Montana, suffers a concussion, broken arm and abrasions, and is listed in stable condition at Evans U.S. Army Community Hospital. Reaves, 32, of Hempstead, Texas, suffers small cuts and is expected to be released from hospital on 23 July. Both are from C Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Aviation Brigade. Just before the crash, "The Air Field heard them call for may day", said Sgt. 1st Class Jack Loudermilk, a post spokesman. Fuel on the Apache ignited shortly after impact, burning a 30-square-yard area, but didn't spread because the area was mostly rock. How Reaves and Mohr escaped before the fire was unknown.
  • 1989 – Tony Aliengena (4th grade) becomes the youngest pilot to fly a plane around the world.
  • 1984 – First flight of the PZL M28 (An-28)
  • 1983 – Dick Smith achieves the first solo circumnavigation of the globe in a helicopter. Smith makes the 56,742 km (35,258 mile) journey in stages using a Bell Jetranger III named Australian Explorer.
  • 1977 – The Egyptian Air Force makes a full-scale attack on a major Libyan Air Force base at El Adem, reportedly killing three Soviet military advisers.
  • 1974 – The US Navy and Marine Corps evacuate 500 people from Cyprus, away from the conflict erupting between Greece and Turkey on the island
  • 1973Pan Am Flight 816, a Boeing 707, crashes shortly after takeoff from Faa'a's airport Tahiti, French Polynesia, killing 77 out of 78 on board.
  • 1972 – American aircraft operating over Vietnam first note the slow-moving, black “Fat Black” surface-to-air missile.
  • 1962Canadian Pacific Air Lines Flight 301, a Bristol Britannia, crashes during an attempted "go-around" following a three-engined approach at Honolulu International Airport, killing 27 of 40 on board.
  • 1962 – Sud Ouest Vautour IIA, c/n 28, first flown 2 January 1958, delivered to the Armée de l'Air (AdA), 18 March 1958. Sold to the Israeli Air Force, 21 March 1958 as 23 and 123. Used as the testbed for the Shafrir 1 missile. Destroyed 22 July 1962 when the missile blows up on the ground while mounted on the aircraft.
  • 1959 – Entered service: Antonov An-10 with Aeroflot.
  • 1959 – Entered service: Sud-Aviation Caravelle with Air France.
  • 1955 – First flight of the Republic XF-84H “Thunderscreech”
  • 1954 – An Air Cathay Douglas DC-4 is shot down near Hainan Island
  • 1950 – AD Skyraiders and F4U Corsairs from the aircraft carrier USS Valley Forge (CV-45) strike targets near Haeju and Inchon, Korea
  • 1944 – The last of 5,936 Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers is completed.
  • 1943 – The first of three modified Lancasters in Trans Canada Airlines markings began Trans-Atlantic Service. By the end of 1944 they were making three round trips per week between Canada and the UK and had carried over 1,000,000 pounds of mail and 2000 passengers.
  • 1943 – 46 U. S. bombers attack a Japanese convoy in Bougainville Strait, sinking the seaplane carrier Nisshin.
  • 1943 – An Avro Lancaster bomber converted for use as a transport aircraft inaugurates the Canadian Government’s Trans Atlantic Air Service, operated by Trans-Canada Air Lines. It sets a non-stop speed record for a flight from Dorval Airport, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, to Prestwick, Scotland, of 12 hours 26 minutes.
  • 1942 – The first P-38 F Lightning fighters of the U. S. Army Air Forces’ 14th Fighter Group depart Presque Isle, Maine, for the United Kingdom via Iceland. They become the first fighters to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.
  • 1941 – The first EAC U-boat is attacked by Canso of No. 116 Squadron. The attack was contested due to lack of evidence.
  • 1940 – First BCATP pupils report to No. 1 SFTS at Camp Borden for service flying training.
  • 1933 – One-eyed pilot Wiley Post lands after completing the first solo flight around the world. Post pioneers the early development of a pressure suit and proves the value of navigating instruments, especially the automatic pilot.
  • 1931July 22-September 1 – Sir Alan Cobham and crew make a 19,800 km (12,300-mile) return flight between England and the Belgian Congo in a Short Valletta.
  • 1929Lufthansa uses a catapult to launch a Heinkel He 12 mail plane from the passenger liner Bremen, 400 km (249 miles) out of New York, speeding the mail on its way before the ship reached port.
  • 1926 – Viking EY is being landed at Kashabowie Lake, Ontario, by F/O AL Morfee when a tip float digs in and the hull breaks in two.
  • 1920 – Donald W. Douglas and Davis R. Davis found the Davis-Douglas Company in Los Angeles, California.
  • 1918 – Indra Lal Roy, India’s first “flying ace”, is killed at the age of 20. Born in Calcutta, Lal Roy attended high school in London, where he enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps (later known as the Royal Air Force) during World War I. After scoring 10 kills in action, he was shot down over northeastern France by a German Fokker. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.
  • 1914 – The Austro-Hungarian Navy battleships Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand, Radetzky, and SMS Zrínyi each transport one flying boat from Pola to the Gulf of Cattaro. The following day they carry out a reconnaissance of the border with Montenegro. These are the first operational flights by naval aircraft.
  • 1914 – Britain’s first airplane passenger service is launched. The short-lived service flies from Leeds to Bradford and back, on half-hour intervals.

References[edit]

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July 23

  • 2010 – A Canadian Forces McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet, 188738, of 419 Moose Squadron, based at Cold Lake, crashed at Lethbridge County Airport during a low-speed, low-altitude practice run for the Alberta International Airshow, the pilot Capt. Brian Bews, 36, ejected in a Martin-Baker seat seconds before the fighter fell off on its starboard wing and impacted on the airfield. He suffered a compression fracture in three vertebrae but is expected to fully recover.
  • 2009 – An Uzbekistan Air Force Mil Mi-24 Hind Helicopter on a routine training exercise crashes near the airport of Chirchiq, Tashkent Province, Uzbekistan killing the 2 crew.
  • 2009 – A Turkish Air Force McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II crashes on take-off after from the Erhaç Air Base in Malatya, Turkey due to a technical fault caused by drop-tank falling from the aircraft. The two crew members successfully eject from the aircraft and were hospitalized after the incident.
  • 2008 – Deceased: Dick Johnson (glider pilot), 85, American glider pilot, aeronautical engineer, plane crash.
  • 1999 – All Nippon Airways Flight 61: Wielding a knife, passenger Yuji Nishizawa hijacks All Nippon Airways Flight 61, a Boeing 747. After he fatally stabs the captain, he is overpowered by the crew and the co-pilot lands the plane safely at Haneda, Japan.
  • 1999 – Launch: Space Shuttle Columbia STS-93 at 12:31 am EDT. Mission highlights: Chandra X-ray Observatory deployed.
  • 1994 – A U.S. Navy North American T-2C Buckeye, BuNo 157051, '0601', of VT-19, based at NAS Meridian, Mississippi, crashed at 1355 hrs. shortly after take-off from NAS Oceana, Virginia, impacting in a wooded area several hundred yards past the runway, with both crew ejecting before the crash. Instructor pilot Lt. Mark Sharp, 32, of Portland, Oregon, died at 1814 hrs. in Virginia Beach General Hospital, said a Navy spokesman, but Marine Lt. Carl Hogsett, 26, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, was reported in good condition at Portsmouth Naval Hospital.
  • 1993China Northwest Airlines Flight 2119, a BAe 146, overruns the runway at Yinchuan Hedong Airport, Ningxia, China after an aborted takeoff; the aircraft crashes into a lake, killing 54 passengers and 1 crew member.
  • 1983Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767, runs out of fuel above Manitoba because of a miscalculation; the crew successfully glides the aircraft to a safe landing at a former Air Force base (and current drag strip) at Gimli, Manitoba; the aircraft becomes known as the "Gimli Glider".
  • 1977 – After threats of shutting down transatlantic air traffic, the U. S. and British governments reach the Bermuda II accord, giving British airlines additional ports of entry in the United States and removing American airlines' rights to carry passengers beyond London and Hong Kong.
  • 1977 – (23-24) Further Egyptian Air Force attacks destroy large numbers of Libyan aircraft before a ceasefire ends the war. Egypt admits the loss of two planes during the last two days of the war.
  • 1973 – Eddie Rickenbacker, WW I fighter pilot, dies at 82.
  • 1973Ozark Air Lines Flight 809, a Fairchild-Hiller FH-227, crashes short of the runway at St. Louis International Airport due to windshear from a thunderstorm, killing 38 of 44 on board.
  • 1973Japan Air Lines Flight 404, a Boeing 747, is hijacked after takeoff from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands; one hijacker is killed and the flight's purser injured by a grenade blast; after several days and multiple flight legs, the passengers are released in Benghazi, Libya and the aircraft is blown up on the ground; this is the first loss of a Boeing 747-200.
  • 1968 – Three members of Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine hijack El Al Flight 426 from Rome to Tel Aviv. Diverting to Algiers the negotiations extend over forty days. Both the hijackers and the hostages go free.
  • 1956 – Bell X-2 rocket plane sets world aircraft speed record of 3,050 kph.
  • 1947 – First (US Navy) air squadron of jets, Quonset Point, RI.
  • 1945 – The Japanese submarines I-400 and I-401 depart Japan to launch a surprise air strike on American ships at Ulithi Atoll using six submarine-launched Aichi M6 A floatplanes painted in American markings. The two submarines will abort the mission and jettison the aircraft on 16 August when they learn of Japan’s surrender.
  • 1944 – During strikes on the southern half of Tinian, aircraft from the aircraft carriers USS Essex (CV-9) and USS Langley (CVL-27) fly almost 200 sorties, those from the escort aircraft carriers USS Gambier Bay (CVE-73) and USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) fly over 50, and those of the U. S. Army Air Forces’ Saipan-based 318th Air Group fly over 100, including 18 sorties with a new weapon, the napalm bomb.
  • 1944 – Focke-Wulf Fw 190C V33 prototype, Werke Nummer 0058, modified to Fw 190 V33/U1 as prototype for Ta 152H-0 with 1,750 hp (1,300 kW) Junkers Jumo 213E-1 engine and new wing fuel tanks of the definitive Ta 152H-1, comprising three tanks in each inner portion, located just aft of the truncated mainspar, first flown 12 July 1944, crashes out of Langenhagen, setting back the flight test program.
  • 1944 – Two Curtiss RA-25A Shrikes, of the 4134th Base Unit, Spokane Army Air Field, collide in flight while participating in a flypast for an air show near Spokane, Washington. Part of a three-plane formation, the left-hand aircraft collided with the middle plane during a turn, both crashing into a valley. Pilot 2nd Lt. George E. Chrep and engineer-rated passenger Sgt. Joseph M. Revinskas were killed in the crash of 42-79804, while pilot 2nd Lt. William R. Scott and passenger Captain Ford K. Sayre, a noted snow skier on the east coast, were killed in the crash of 42-79826. A Paramount Pictures newsreel crew caught the accident on film, which was examined by the crash investigation board for clues to the accident. This footage was later incorporated into the 1956 film Earth vs. the Flying Saucers
  • 1941 – During Operation Substance, Italian high-level and torpedo bombers attack a resupply convoy of six fast store ships bound for Malta escorted by a British naval forces including the aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal. The high-level bombers are ineffective and Fairey Fulmars from Ark Royal shoot down two of them, but the six torpedo bombers fatally damage the destroyer HMS Fearless and cripple the light cruiser HMS Manchester.
  • 1940 – “Blitz” all-night air raid by German bombers on London begins.
  • 1937 – The International Military Aircraft Competition in Debendorf near Zuich provided the picturesque venue for the first major demonstration of the Messerschmitt Bf 109.
  • 1930 – Aviation pioneer Glenn Curtiss dies at age of 52.
  • 1917 – Maj. Benjamin D. Foulois, one of the great figures of early American aviation, is appointed commanding officer of the Airplane Division of the U. S. Signal Corps.
  • 1913 – With his biplane fitted with electric lights on the wings and his landing area outlined with small blazes, H. W. Blakeley makes the first night flight in Canada at the Dominion Livestock Show and Fair at Brandon, Manitoba.
  • 1906 – Having abandoned his helicopter project, Alberto Santos-Dumont unveils a new aircraft, the No.14 bis. at Bagatelle, France. The odd-looking machine is dubbed canard (duck).
  • 1905 – The first flight of the Wright Flyer III took place in June 1905.[2] This is the first fully controllable and practical version of the original Flyer.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rebels Repulse Attack by Gaddafi Forces". The Sydney Morning Herald. Agence France-Presse. 25 July 2011. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  2. ^ http://www.wright-brothers.org/Information_Desk/Just_the_Facts/Airplanes/Wright_Airplanes.htm

Edit today's anniversaries

July 24

  • 2009Aria Air Flight 1525, an Ilyushin Il-62, skids off the runway at Mashhad International Airport, killing 17 of 153 on board.
  • 2009 – The Italian Civil Aviation Authority suspends the operating licence of MyAir due to financial problems and service failures.
  • 1999All Nippon Airways Flight 61, a Boeing 747, is hijacked by a passenger, Yuji Nishizawa, wielding a knife; after fatally stabbing the captain, he is overpowered by the crew; the first officer lands the plane safely at Haneda, Japan.
  • 1993 – At 1517 hrs. two Mikoyan MiG-29s, 526, c/n 25887, and 925, c/n 15564, of the Russian Flight Research Institute took off for a demonstration at RIAT RAF Fairford 1993, but during display suffer mid-air collision, both pilots, Alexander Beschastonov and Sergey Tresvyatsk,2] ejecting safely. Video of this accident is widely available on the internet.
  • 1992Mandala Airlines Flight 660, a Vickers Viscount 816, crashed on approach to Pattimura Airport, Ambon, Indonesia, killing all 7 crew and 63 passengers on board.
  • 1978 – McDonnell Douglas completes the 5,000th F-4 Phantom II.
  • 1970 – USAF McDonnell Douglas F-4C-20-MC Phantom II, 63-7609, crashes SE of McNeal, Arizona.
  • 1969 – Apollo 11 splashes down safely in the Pacific Ocean.
  • 1965 – Four F-4 C Phantoms escorting a bombing raid at Kang Chi are the targets of SA-2 Guideline surface-to-air antiaircraft missiles in the first such attack against American planes in the Vietnam war. One is shot down and the other three sustain damage.
  • 1961 – Deliveries of the McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo to the Royal Canadian Air Force commence.
  • 1953 – (24-26) Operating off the east coast of Korea, the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers USS Boxer (CVA-21), USS Lake Champlain (CVA-39), USS Philippine Sea (CVA-47), and USS Princeton (CVA-37), supporting United Nations ground forces, break records for the number of sorties flown with the highest sortie rates of the Korean War. They average 170 sorties per day, and Princeton aircraft fly 184 sorties on one day.
  • 1946 – Bernard Lynch becomes the first person to be “shot” out of an airplane. Lynch was involved in the first airborne test of a British “ejection seat. ” Lynch ejected from a Gloster Meteor Mk III at 320 mph.
  • 1945 – Task Force 38 carrier aircraft fly 1,747 sorties against no air opposition, striking targets in the Inland Sea of Japan in one of the heaviest days of carrier air strikes of World War II. At Kure, Japan, they sink the battleship Hyūga, the heavy cruisers Tone and Aoba, and the obsolete battleship Settsu and armored cruiser Iwate, heavily damage the aircraft carrier Amagi, and damage the aircraft carrier Kaiyo. In addition, 570 U. S. Army Air Forces B-29 s drop 3,445 tons (3,125,283 kg) of bombs on Osaka and Nagoya, Japan.
  • 1945 – (24-26) Aircraft from carriers of the British 21st Aircraft Carrier Squadron strike Japanese airfields and shipping in northern Malaya.
  • 1944 – U. S. forces land on Tinian.
  • 1943 – The Royal Air Force (RAF) use “Window, ” code name for metal foil dropped to confuse enemy radar, for the first time.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) 791 British bombers attack Hamburg, Germany, beginning Operation Gomorrah or the “Battle of Hamburg, a systematic effort by Bomber Command chief Air Marshal Arthur Harris to destroy the city. For the first time, the Royal Air Force uses chaff, codenamed “Window”, to foil German radar. About 1,500 people are killed, more than in all 137 previous air attacks on the city combined. Twelve British bombers are lost.
  • 1941 – The Boeing-built Douglas DB-7 B attack bomber makes its first flight.
  • 1938 – At Campo de Marte, Santa Ana, Usaquén, Colombia, a pilot performing an aerobatic display crashes a Curtiss F11C Goshawk into a crowd attending a military review. Sources differ on the number killed and injured up to 75 died and 100 or more were injured. According to TIME magazine, the pilot, Flt. Lt. Cesar Abadia of the Colombian Air Force, disregarded standing orders not to fly below 500 feet and attempted to dive through a narrow gap between two grandstands. The pilot misjudged his approach and a wingtip hit the Diplomatic stand the plane then smashed against the Presidential stand and exploded, raining flaming debris down on spectators located between the two grandstands.
  • 1917 – Congress approves the expenditure of $640 million on military aviation. It is the largest single appropriation approved by Congress.
  • 1897 – Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly alone across the Atlantic Ocean and one of the world’s most famous aviators, is born in Atchinson, Kansas.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Weaver, Matthew; Whitaker, Brian (24 July 2012). "Syria crisis: clashes and prison mutiny in Aleppo". The Guardian. 
  2. ^ The Independent, 25 July 2012

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July 25

  • 2011 – NATO aircraft strike various targets in Ziltan, Libya. The Libyan government claims that they struck a health clinic, a food-storage complex, and a military base and killed at least 11 civilians. NATO later rejects the claims, saying its planes hit a command-and-control node and a vehicle storage facility.[1]
  • 2008Qantas Flight 30, a Boeing 747-438 en route from Hong Kong to Melbourne, performs an emergency descent and lands in Manila after a hull penetration results in rapid decompression. All aboard survive.
  • 2000Air France Flight 4590 Concorde crashes during takeoff from Paris, France after its fuel tank catches fire, killing 9 crew and 101 passengers as well as four on the ground; the entire Concorde fleet is grounded for one year.
  • 1984 – Cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya becomes the first woman to perform a space walk, floating around the Salyut 7 space station for over 3 1/2 hours.
  • 1973 – The Soviet Union launches Mars 5, the fifth of seven of probes sent to the red planet in the 1960s and 70 s. Mars 5 would reach Mars in February of 1974, where it would transmit about 60 photos back to Earth before losing pressurization.
  • 1962 – The US Army forms its first armed helicopter company, using UH-1 Hueys
  • 1962 – The third launch attempt of a nuclear warhead in Operation Fishbowl, as part of Operation Dominic, aboard an Douglas SM-75 Thor IRBM, 58-2291, vehicle number 180, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, named Bluegill Prime, after the 2 June 1962 failure of the first attempt, Bluegill, also fails when, due to a sticking valve, the Thor missile malfunctions after ignition of the rocket engine, but before leaving the launch pad. The range safety officer destroys the nuclear warhead by radio command with the missile still on the launch pad. The vehicle then explodes, causing extensive damage in the area of the launch pad. Although there was no danger of an accidental nuclear explosion, the destruction of the nuclear warhead on the pad causes extensive contamination of the area by alpha-emitting radioactive materials. Burning rocket fuel, flowing through the cable trenches, causes extensive chemical contamination of the trenches and the equipment associated with the cabling in the trenches. The radiation contamination on Johnston Island is determined to be a major problem, and it is necessary to decontaminate the entire area before the badly damaged launch pad can be rebuilt. Further launch operations will not resume until 15 October 1962. Although, by definition, this qualifies as a Broken Arrow incident, this test is rarely included in lists of such mishaps.
  • 1952 – French Leduc 0.22-01 ramjet-powered prototype interceptor, repaired following 27 November 1951 landing accident, strikes its SNCASE Languedoc launch aircraft, F-BCUT, on release and is forced to make a belly-landing. Limited range of design causes project to be dropped and second prototype not completed.
  • 1950 – Middle East Airlines “Dakota” aircraft was on its way from Jerusalem to Beirut when an Israeli military aircraft opened fire at the Lebanese-Israeli border. The radio operator “Antoine Wazir” was hit by a deadly bullet while sitting in his chair near the pilot.
  • 1949 – The MacRobertson Miller Aviation Douglas DC-3 airliner Fitzroy, registration VH-MME, crashes on takeoff during a driving rain from Perth, Australia, killing all 18 people on board.
  • 1949 – RCAF World War II ace, Squadron Leader Robert Allen "Bob" Kipp, DSO, DFC, (12 October 1919 - 25 July 1949), commanding officer of No. 410 Squadron, is killed while practicing aerobatics in a de Havilland Vampire F.3 of the Blue Devils demonstration team.
  • 1948 – A Douglas C-47B-15-DK Skytrain, 43-49534, c/n 15350/26795, participating in the Berlin Airlift, departs Wiesbaden Air Base, Germany, strikes apartment building on approach to Berlin and crashes in the street, killing both crew, 1st Lt. Charles H. King, and 1st Lt. Robert W. Stuber.
  • 1947 – First (of two) North American XP-82 Twin Mustangs, 44-83886, c/n 120-43742, of the 611 AAF Base Unit, crash lands at Eglin Field, Florida.
  • 1947 – US Air Force, Navy & War Dept form US Dept of Defense.
  • 1945 – No. 7 Squadron was disbanded.
  • 1944 – Aircraft from the British aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious strike Sabang, Sumatra.
  • 1943 – 100 U. S. Army Eighth Air Force bombers attack Hamburg.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) – 705 British bombers attack Essen, Germany, causing considerable damage to the Krupp works. Twenty-six British aircraft do not return.
  • 1943 – U. S. Army Fifth Air Force B-25 Mitchell bombers destroy two Japanese destroyers aground on a reef near Cape Gloucester, New Britain.
  • 1940 – (Overnight) 166 British bombers strike German airfields in the Netherlands and targets in the Ruhr.
  • 1938 – The Battle of the Ebro begins in Spain with a Republican offensive. Although Nationalist bombers attack bridges over the Ebro, Nationalist fighters are still deployed in Valencia and Spanish Republican fighter pilots trained in the Soviet Union gain local air superiority flying improved versions of the Polikarpov I-15 and I-16.
  • 1937 – The Battle of Brunete ends. During the 20-day-long battle, the Republicans have lost about 100 aircraft, while the Nationalists have lost 23. The appearance of the German Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter and Heinkel He 111 bomber and the Italian Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 bomber in numbers during the battle signals the end of Republican air superiority in the Spanish Civil War.
  • 1923 – The first Canadian built amphibian, the Vickers Viking IV, was flown from the St. Lawrence at Montreal.
  • 1915 – Captain Lanoe Hawker of the RFC wins first Victoria Cross for aerial combat, over France.
  • 1909 – Van den Schkrouff makes the first flight in Russia in a Voisin biplane at Odessa.
  • 1909Louis Blériot claims a £1,000 prize from the British Daily Mail newspaper for being the first pilot to cross the English Channel. He makes the crossing in his Blériot Type XI from Les Barraques (near Calais) to Northfall Meadow (near Dover Castle) in 37 min. Blériot also received an additional £3,000 from the French government.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Watson, Ivan; Karadsheh, Jomana (26 July 2011). "Libya's Zlitan Increasingly in Rebel, NATO Sights". CNN. Retrieved 26 July 2011. 

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July 26

  • 2011 – Royal Moroccan Air Force Lockheed C-130 Hercules crash: Lockheed C-130 Hercules transport aircraft operated by the Royal Moroccan Air Force crashed near Guelmim, Morocco. A statement by Moroccan authorities claimed that there were 78 fatalities and that the plane was carrying 60 members of the Moroccan Armed Forces, 12 civilians, and nine RMAF crew members. Three wounded survivors were rescued, but eventually died of their injuries. The number of fatalities was later revised to 80 when it was discovered that a passenger who had not boarded the plane had been mistakenly included in the total.
  • 2006 – (26-31) The 15th FAI World Rally Flying Championship takes place in Troyes, France. Individual winners are Wacław Wieczorek/Michał Wieczorek (Poland), Jiří Filip/Michal Filip (Czech Republic), and Petr Opat/Tomas Rajdl (Czech Republic). Team winners are 1. Czech Republic, 2. Poland, and 3. France.
  • 2005 – Launch: Space Shuttle Columbia STS-114 at 14:39:00 UTC. Mission highlights: First post Columbia flight. Flight safety evaluation/testing, ISS supply/repair, MPLM Raffaello.
  • 2003 – (July 26 – August 3) The 13th FAI World Rally Flying Championship takes place in Rustenburg, South Africa. the individual winners are 1. Nigel Hopkins and Dale de Klerk (South Africa), 2. Janusz Darocha and Zbigniew Chrząszcz (Poland), 3. Nathalie Strube and P. Sicard (France); the team winners are 1. South Africa, 2. France, 3. Poland.
  • 1993Asiana Airlines Flight 733, a Boeing 737, crashes into a mountain in Haenam, South Korea after failed landing attempts, killing 78 of the 110 people on board; this crash is the first loss of a Boeing 737-500.
  • 1971 – Apollo 15 launched. It was the first of what were termed J missions—long duration stays on the Moon with a greater focus on science than had been possible on previous missions.
  • 1996 – Arthur William Raynes McDonald, radar Pioneer / pilot, dies at 93.
  • 1971 – Apollo 15 is launched on its way to becoming the fourth lunar landing.
  • 1962 – The world’s first geosynchronous communications satellite, Syncom 2, is launched from Cape Canaveral aboard a Delta B rocket.
  • 1959 – An Vought F8U-1 Crusader from VMF-122 was passing through 47,000 feet (14,000 m) when the engine seized. The ram air turbine did not deploy and the pilot lost control of the aircraft causing him to eject from that altitude. LtCol William H. Rankin, then commanding officer of the squadron earned a place in the Guinness Book of Records by surviving the longest recorded parachute descent in history. He had ejected into a violent thunderstorm over North Carolina which caused his descent to last 40 minutes vice the expected 11 minutes.
  • 1958 – United States Air Force test-pilot Iven Carl Kincheloe, Jr. is killed in unsuccessful ejection attempt after the engine of his Lockheed F-104A-15-LO Starfighter, 56-0772, fails during takeoff at Edwards Air Force Base, California, United States. While flying a Bell X-2, Kincheloe became the first man to exceed 100,000 ft (30,500 m) of altitude, and he is often credited as the first man to enter outer space. Kinross Air Force Base, Michigan renamed Kincheloe Air Force Base in September 1959.
  • 1946 – The crash of an Stinson L-5E Sentinel, 44-17844, during a routine flight out of Eglin Field, Florida, kills Capt. Russell H. Rothman, originally of Chicago, Illinois, when the liaison aircraft crashes 17 miles NW of Valparaiso, Florida. Rothman, who entered the service 16 September 1941 and had flown 800 hours in C-46 Commando and C-47 Skytrain transports in the European Theatre of Operations, had only recently been appointed to a regular commission in the Regular Army. He held the Unit Citation, the Air Medal with three clusters, the European and Middle East Theatre of Operations Ribbon, the American Defense Ribbon and the World War II Victory Medal. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Eleanor E. Rothman, of 26 Shalimar Court, Shalimar, Florida, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Rothman of Chicago.
  • 1946 – Trans-Pacific Airines (the future Aloha Airlines) begins non-scheduled interisland service in Hawaii using a World War II surplus Douglas C-47.
  • 1943 – 60 U. S. Eighth Air Force bombers strike Hamburg.
  • 1943 – Over 100 German aircraft attack an Allied convoy off Cape Bon, Tunisia, but defending British fighters prevent them from inflicting any serious damage.
  • 1939 – The first of over two thousand Havard aircraft were taken onto RCAF strength.
  • 1937 – Famous pilot, Jacqueline Cochran, sets a new speed record for women by flying over 203 mph.
  • 1929 – Johnny Burtin sets a new world altitude record of 26,531 feet for airplanes with a 1-ton load. Burtin’s flight also proves that at high altitudes, fuel consumption drops considerably and wind resistance is reduced, making high-altitude flying more economical and profitable.
  • 1926 – During United States Navy experiments with the operation of seaplanes from a submarine equipped with an aircraft hangar, the submarine USS S-1 (SS-105) carries out for the first time a full cycle of surfacing, removing the disassembled seaplane from its hangar, assembling it, launching it, retrieving it, disassembling it, stowing in its hangar, and submerging, on the Thames River at New London, Connecticut.
  • 1918 – Maj Edward Mannock, Britain's highest scoring ace of the war, is shot down by German ground fire. He had scored 73 victories.
  • 1914 – Seventh aircraft erected at Tokorozawa Airfield, Japan, the Kaishiki Converted Type Mo (Maurice Farman Type), 7, crashed at this airfield while piloted by Capt. Tokugawa. When rebuilt, with completion on 19 January 1915, this 7th Type Mo 1913 became known as the Sawada Type No. 7, or more officially because of radical modifications, as the Kaishiki the 3rd Year Model.
  • 1910 – Capt. G. W. P. Dawes becomes the first British Army officer to be awarded an aviator’s certificate in England, when he qualifies for certificate no.17 on a Humber Monoplane at Wolverhampton, England.
  • 1909 – Louis Bleriot, a French inventor and engineer, made the first flight across the English Channel in the Bleriot XI, an aircraft of his own design.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yacoub, Khaled (26 July 2012). "U.S. fears Syria preparing for massacre in Aleppo". Yahoo. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  2. ^ Anshel Pfeffer, Haaretz Service and News Agencies (26 July 2010). "Netanyahu: Romania helicopter crash is an immense tragedy". Haaretz. Retrieved 4 August 2010. 
  3. ^ "'Bodies found' as Israeli helicopter crashes in Romania". BBC News. 26 July 2010. Archived from the original on 27 July 2010. Retrieved 28 July 2010. 

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July 27

  • 2002Sknyliv air show disaster: A Ukrainian Air Force Sukhoi Su-27UB crashes during the Lviv airshow killing 85 spectators, 5 of them children. 199 were injured. Pilots managed to eject, but the plane crashed on spectators watching the airshow from the ground. The plane lacked the altitude to escape the crash, and it hit the tribune and fell on the ground. As stated by Ukrainian Defense Ministry, the crash was caused because of engine failure. Pilots, unit commanders later jailed.
  • 1999 – Rollout of the Boeing Business Jet (BBJ). On Oct. 11 Boeing Business Jets will launch the larger BBJ 2.
  • 1989Korean Air Flight 803, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10, crashes while attempting to land in heavy fog at Tripoli, Libya. 75 of the 199 passengers and crew on board plus 4 people on the ground are killed in the accident.
  • 1982 – A United States Air Force F-5B and a F-5F collide over Tucson, Arizona, three crew ejected but one was killed.
  • 1982 – A USAF Sikorsky HH-53C, 69-5792, (conflict here—second source lists it as 69-5782) from the 1551st CCTW at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, crashed following a descent from a night time refueling mission, four killed.
  • 1971 – Indian Air Force production HAL HF-24 Marut Mk.1, flown by Wing Commander J. K. Mohlah, crashes just after takeoff at Bangalore, pilot KWF.
  • 1965 – American aircraft strike a surface-to-air missile site for the first time, attacking an SA-2 Guideline site in North Vietnam.
  • 1961 – During Arctic ASW reconnaissance, Bill Misener and crew of 415 Squadron flew Argus 20722 for 30 hours and 20 min.
  • 1960 – North American F-100C Super Sabre, assigned to the USAF Thunderbirds on 28 March 1960, is destroyed this date during a solo proficiency flight when it crashes fifty miles from Nellis AFB, Nevada, killing Capt. John R. Crane.
  • 1956 – IvA USAF Boeing B-47E-130-BW Stratojet, 53-4230, of the 307th Bomb Wing from Lincoln AFB, Nebraska, crashes while making touch-and-goes at RAF Lakenheath, skidding off runway and into nuclear weapons storage igloo holding three Mark 6 nuclear bombs, burns. No weapons in the facility go off and all are later repaired. Stratojet was unarmed.
  • 1955El Al Flight 402, a Lockheed L-049 Constellation, inadvertently strays over Bulgarian territory on its way from Vienna to Tel Aviv, and is shot down by two Bulgarian fighter aircraft, killing all 58 on board.
  • 1954 – Second prototype Avro Vulcan, VX777, suffers substantial damage when it swings off runway upon landing at Farnborough. It will not fly for six months.
  • 1953 – The Korean War ends.
  • 1950 – RCAF moved in support of United Nations action in Korea. No. 426 (Transport) Squadron began airlift of supplies to Tokyo, Japan.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) – 787 British bombers attack Hamburg, with a loss of 17 aircraft. Atmospheric conditions create a self-propagating tornadic firestorm with winds of 150 mph (240 km/hr) and flames reaching 1,000 feet (305 m) in altitude, resulting in one of the most destructive air raids in history. Air temperatures reach 1,500 degrees F (850 degrees C), causing asphalt in city streets to catch fire. At least 40,000 people die in the raid and 1,200,000 flee the city, which does not regain its previous industrial capacity for the rest of the war. The raid shocks Germany.
  • 1942 – F/S G. F. Beurling downed four enemy aircraft while serving with the RAF in Malta.
  • 1939 – The first of 38 B-23 Dragons built flew.
  • 1934 – First prototype Messerschmitt Bf 108A, D-LBUM, accepted by the Luftwaffe for competition flying, crashes, killing the pilot, a member of Erhard Milch's staff at the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (Ministry of Aviation).
  • 1931 – The Air Line Pilots Association of the USA is formed.
  • 1929 – Western Canada Airways pilot W. L. Brintnell flew a Fokker F. VII/3 M from Vancouver to Winnipeg 10 hours, 30 min.
  • 1928 – The Boeing Model 80, a 12-passenger trimotor biplane transport, makes its first flight. The design is upgraded to the 18-passenger Model 80 A, which makes its first flight a year later.
  • 1923 – A Navy Cox-Klemin XS-1 was the first airplane launched from a submarine.
  • 1923 – Edward Stinson lands his Junkers at Mitchell Field in New York after making the first non-stop flight from Chicago.
  • 1920 – Radio compass used for first time for aircraft navigation.
  • 1912 – Lieutenant John Rodgers and Ensign Charles Maddox, in a Wright B1 Flyer, send the first wireless message from an airplane to a ship, the torpedo boat USS Stringham, stationed in Annapolis, Maryland.
  • 1909 – Orville Wright makes the first official test flight of the U. S. Army’s first airplane in Fort Meyer, Virginia. President William Howard Taft, his cabinet, and 10,000 spectators witness the flight. The flight lasts 1 h 12 m 40 s.
  • 1901 – Wilbur and Orville Wright make the first of a series of test glides at Kill Devil Hills near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Their redesigned biplane glider No. 2 has a larger wing area and wing control worked by a pilot’s hip-cradle device.

References[edit]

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July 28

  • 2011 – A General Dynamics F-16C Block 30H Fighting Falcon, 87-296, c/n 5C-557, of the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, flying out of Montgomery Air National Guard Base, overruns the runway at the EAA AirVenture Oshkosh air show at Wittman Regional Airport, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The nose gear collapsed, the nose radome broke and the air-frame skidded to a stop. Pilot was uninjured.
  • 2010 – The 2010 Alaska C-17 crash occurred when a United States Air Force military transport plane crashed on Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska with the loss of all four crew aboard. The aircraft involved was a Boeing C-17 Globemaster III (tail number 00-0173) and the crash is believed to be the first fatal accident involving a C-17. The crew were preparing for Elmendorf’s Arctic Thunder Air Show, which went ahead three days later as a tribute.
  • 2010Airblue Flight 202, an Airbus A321, crashes into a hill in the Margalla Hills north-east of Islamabad apparently due to bad weather resulting in 146 passengers and 6 crew members perished. It is the first fatal accident involving an Airbus A321 and Pakistan's worst air disaster.
  • 2010 – A United States Air Force Boeing C-17A Lot XII Globemaster III, 00-0173, c/n P-73, "Spirit of the Aleutians", callsign Sitka 43, of the 3d Wing, on a training mission, crashed at ~1822 hrs. into a wooded area on Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, Alaska killing 3 members of the Alaska Air National Guard and 1 member of the US Air Force.
  • 2010 – An Iraqi military Mil Mi-17 helicopter crashes in a sandstorm. Five-member crew is killed.[3]
  • 2009 – Cambodian airline Cambodia Angkor Air commences operations.
  • 2008 – Deceased: Margaret Ringenberg, 87, an American aviator, who had logged more than 40,000 hours, natural causes.
  • 1982 – The first McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet is delivered to the Canadian Forces Air Command.
  • 1976 – Speed Records set. Two records set; USAF Capt Eldon W Joersz, 2193.16 mph over a straight course, and USAF Maj Adolphus H Bledsoe, 2092.29 mph over a closed circuit, both in Lockheed SR-71As at Beale AFB CA.
  • 1976 – Altitude record of 85,069′ attained in horizontal flight set in a Lockheed SR-71 A at Beale AFB CA by USAF Capt Robert C. Helt.
  • 1957 – Two Mark 5 nuclear bombs without nuclear capsules installed were jettisoned from a Douglas C-124 Globemaster II in the Atlantic Ocean ~100 miles (160 km) SE of Naval Air Station Pomona, New Jersey, just outside Delaware Bay E of Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, and S of Wildwood and Cape May, New Jersey. The aircraft was carrying three weapons and one nuclear capsule; the weapons were in Complete Assembly for Ferry (CAF) condition. Nuclear components were not installed; power supplies were installed but not connected. The C-124 was en route from Dover AFB, Delaware, to Europe via the Azores islands when its two port engines lost power. Maximum power was applied to the two starboard engines, however, level flight could not be maintained. The crew decided to jettison one weapon at an altitude of 4,500 feet (1,400 m) ~75 miles (121 km) off the coast of New Jersey. The second weapon was jettisoned soon afterwards at an altitude of 2,500 feet (760 m) at a distance of 50 miles (80 km) from the New Jersey coast. No detonation was seen to occur from either weapon, and both bombs were presumed to have been damaged or destroyed on impact with the sea and to have sunk almost instantly. The C-124 landed at an airfield in the vicinity of Atlantic City, New Jersey, with the remaining weapon and the nuclear capsule aboard. After a three-month long search, neither the weapons nor any debris were located. By November 1957, the AEC was taking action to issue replacement weapons to the DOD. No public announcement of this incident was made at the time it happened.
  • 1950 – The first scheduled passenger service flown by a gas-turbine powered airliner (turboprop) is British European Airway’s (British European Airways) Vickers V. 630 Viscount.
  • 1950 – A U. S. Air Force B-29 Superfortress mistakenly shoots down a British Seafire of No. 800 Squadron from HMS Triumph off Korea, apparently mistaking it for a Yak-9
  • 1945 – Task Force 38 carrier aircraft again carry out heavy airstrikes against targets in the Inland Sea without meeting aerial opposition. They sink the aircraft carrier Amagi, the battleships Haruna and Ise, and the obsolete armored cruiser Izumo and damage the aircraft carriers Katsuragi and Kaiyo. In addition, 548 U. S. Army Air Forces B-29 s drop 4,427 tons (4,016,148 kg) of bombs on Tsu and other cities in Japan.
  • 1945B-25 Empire State Building crash: A US Army Air Forces North American B-25D Mitchell bomber, 41-30577, named "Old John Feather Merchant", crashes into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building in fog at 0949 hrs., killing 3 on aircraft plus 11 on ground and causing over US$1 million in damage.
  • 1943 – For first time the No. 6 Group was able to send over 200 heavies to a single target as 234 aircraft visited Hamburg. It turned out to be a costly night as 22 aircraft failed to return.
  • 1942 – (Overnight) 256 British bombers attack Hamburg, Germany, with the loss of 30 aircraft, an unacceptably high 11.7 percent loss rate.
  • 1938 – Pan American World Airways Flight 229, a Martin M-130 flying boat named the Hawaii Clipper, disappears westbound from Guam to Manila with 6 passengers and 9 crew
  • 1935 – The Boeing Model 299 (XB-17), prototype of the B-17, makes its first flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. Newspaper reporters nickname it “The Flying Fortress. ”
  • 1934 – Nelly Diener becomes Europe’s first air stewardess.
  • 1933 – Dr. Albert Forsythe and Charles Alfred “Chief” Anderson land at Atlantic City to complete the first return flight to the West Coast by African-American pilots.
  • 1918 – Royal Air Force Sopwith Dolphin E4449 flown by Tone Bayetto crashed in Hampshire, England when the wings folded back and it dived into the ground from 200 feet.
  • 1913 – A Caudron G.3 amphibian takes off from a platform aboard the Hermes while she is underway and lands at Great Yarmouth.
  • 1914 – Royal Naval Air Service Squadron Commander Arthur M. Longmore successfully releases a 14-inch (356-mm) torpedo from a Short Admiralty Type 81 floatplane. It may be the first successful aerial launch of a torpedo, although Captain Alessandro Guidoni of Italy’s drop of a dummy torpedo from the experimental Pateras Pescara monoplane in “mid-1914″ may have been ëarlier.
  • 1914 – outbreak of World War I Aviation changes war in a twofold way. The aeroplane turns the sky into a new battle field where about 20,000 flyers, most of them trained pilots die. Aircraft eliminate the distinction between frontline and hinterland, with the civilian population far behind the frontline also becoming a target.
  • 1858 – Nadar takes first airborne photo (in a balloon).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paul Schemm (28 July 2012). "Syrian forces move to retake Aleppo". Yahoo. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  2. ^ Paul Schemm (28 July 2012). "Syrian rebels survive regime onslaught in Aleppo". Yahoo. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  3. ^ Sinan Salaheddin (2010-07-28). "Iraq military helicopter crash kills five". Associated Press. Retrieved 2010-07-28. A sandstorm has downed an Iraqi military helicopter, killing its five-member crew, while a Baghdad blast has killed five Iraqis, officials say. The helicopter was providing aerial protection to Shia pilgrims travelling to the city of Karbala when it crashed in the sandstorm early in the morning. 

Edit today's anniversaries

July 29

  • 2009 – An Airbus A330-203 operated Air France is substantially damaged at Maya-Maya Airport, Brazil when a wing strikes a building during ground manoeuvres.
  • 2005 – The U. S. Army awards a contract for the purchase of 368 Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters (ARH) to Bell Helicopter Textron.
  • 2003 – The International Space Station’s 1,000th consecutive day of astronauts living on board.
  • 1988 – Launch: Space Shuttle Discovery STS-51-F at 21:00:00 UTC. Mission highlights: Spacelab mission, Abort to Orbit.
  • 1985 – The eighth flight of Space Shuttle Challenger, and 19th shuttle flight overall, lifts off from Cape Canaveral for mission STS-51-F. Five minutes and 45 seconds into its ascent, main engine number one shuts down due to a malfunctioning high temperature sensor, forcing the crew to abort its originally planned orbit and coast to a lower orbit. Receiving more attention than the Spacelab 2 module on board was the “Carbonated Beverage Dispenser Evaluation, ” a test financed by Coca-Cola and Pepsi to determine if carbonated soft drinks could be enjoyed in space using specially designed cans. The verdict: No.
  • 1971 – American and United airlines take delivery of the first two production Douglas DC-10 jetliners, and American puts its new DC-10 in regular service just eight days later.
  • 1970 – Lt. (j.g.) William Belden, 23, of Racine, Wisconsin, ejects from an McDonnell Douglas A-4E Skyhawk on the deck of the USS Shangri-La in the western Pacific. Pilot recovered shaken but unhurt by helicopter; Skyhawk later recovered from carrier catwalk.
  • 1967 – On Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin off North Vietnam, a flight deck fire aboard the aircraft carrier USS Forrestal (CVA-59) kills 134 men, injures 161,
  • 1967 – A deckfire on the USS Forrestal caused by an unintentional firing of a Zuni rocket by an electrical short-circuit from the underwing rack of an McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II at 1051 hrs. holes the fuel tank of an McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. Spilled fuel ignites and ordnance on the ready jets is set off by the blaze. Twenty-six aircraft are destroyed or jettisoned, 31 others are damaged, 132 crewmen die, 62 are injured and two are missing. The last major fire is extinguished at 4 a.m. on 30 July. See: 1967 USS Forrestal fire. Among lost airframes are Douglas A-4E Skyhawk, BuNos 149996, 150064, 150068, 150084, 150115, 150118, 150129, 152018, 152024, 152036, 152040; McDonnell Douglas F-4B Phantom II, 153046, 153054, 153060, 153061, 153066, 150069, 150912; and North American RA-5C Vigilantes of RVAH-11, 148932, 149284, and 149305.
  • 1959 – The first jetway in the U. S. is installed at the International Airport in San Francisco, California. Designed to protect passengers from the weather when they board or leave the jet plane, it is a powered telescopic or collapsible corridor that extends to the aircraft and connects the plane to the terminal. They are commonplace in all airports today.
  • 1959 – Royal Navy Fairey Gannet AS.4, XA465, 'C 234', cannot lower undercarriage, makes power-on deck belly landing into crash barrier on HMS Centaur. Crew okay but airframe written off, salvaged in Singapore, ending up on fire dump at Sembawang.
  • 1958 – President Eisenhower signs the National Aeronautics and Space Act, creating a new federal agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA’s stated goal is to enable the U. S. to lead the exploration of space for peaceful purposes to benefit humanity.
  • 1952 – A USAF RB-45 Tornado makes the first non-stop crossing of the Pacific by jet
  • 1952 – A Royal Air Force Boeing Washington B.1, WW349, hit while parked at Wisley, Surrey by Vickers Valiant, WJ954, in taxi accident. No injuries. Airframe had been intended for transfer to RAAF as third of three.
  • 1949 – Airlift in West-Germany to West-Berlin ends.
  • 1947 – Nine crew are killed and two injured in a failed take-off attempt by a Boeing B-29 Superfortress from Eglin Field, Florida at 0813 hrs., the bomber coming down ~300 yards N of the main base near Valparaiso, Florida and burning. Killed were instructor pilot Capt. Gordon W. Barrett, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, a West Point graduate who was awarded the DFC while flying Boeing B-29 Superfortresses in World War II; pilot 1st Lt. Huddie C. Bagley of Braufield, Texas; co-pilot Capt. Robert M. Seldomridge of Lancaster, Pennsylvania; navigator 1st Lt. Joseph A. Anderson, Shalimar, Florida; navigator 1st Lt. Milton Rose, Fort Walton, Florida; engineer Master Sgt. Michele Aulicino, Mary Esther, Florida; scanner Staff Sgt. Hugh T. Mulholland of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; scanner Cpl. Ashley W. Odom, McBee, South Carolina; and scanner Pfc. Donald D. Crawford from Fort Worth, Texas. Injured were scanner S/Sgt. Jeremiah W. Conlon of Worthington, Kentucky, admitted to the Eglin hospital with abrasions of the face and head, and ankle injuries; and radio operator S/Sgt. Lloyd D. Farris of Pensacola, Florida, with minor injuries but admitted for observation. The Superfortress apparently failed to gain much altitude before coming down, said Capt. Robert Gaughan, base public relations officer.
  • 1946 – First Swedish pilot to use an ejection seat to escape a crippled aircraft, Lt. Bengt Johansson (who later changes it to Järkenstedt), saves himself this date when the Saab J 21A-1, of 2 Divisionen, F9 Wing, out of Säve, collides with FFVS J 22 of another F9 Divisionen while engaged in naval gunnery attack practice. While climbing out from a gunnery pass, the J 21 is struck by the pursuing J 22, shearing off one of the J 21's twin tails. With control lost, Johansson jettisons canopy and ejects, other pilot also bails out of crippled J 22, both parachute into the sea where they are rescued by a Swedish navy destroyer. At the time the Swedish press describes the incident as a "first", the 13 January 1942 ejection by German Helmut Schenk from a Heinkel He 280 being little known at this point.
  • 1945 – U. S. Army Air Forces B-25 Mitchells and U. S. Navy aircraft from the aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) further damage the Japanese aircraft carrier Kaiyo in Beppu Bay.
  • 1945 – (29-30) Japanese kamikazes make their last attacks on ships off Okinawa, damaging two U. S. destroyers.
  • 1945 – (29-30) Carrier aircraft of Task Force 38 strike the Maizuru Naval Arsenal and the north coast of Honshu, Japan.
  • 1943 – (Overnight) Another raid on Hamburg by 777 British bombers targets undamaged areas in the northern part of the city, killing about 1,000 more people. The British lose 28 aircraft
  • 1938 – (July 29-August 11) During the Lake Khasan Incident along the border between the Soviet Union and Manchukuo, 70 fighters and 180 bombers of the Soviet Air Force conduct heavy strikes against Imperial Japanese Army positions.
  • 1938 – An Arado Ar 79 sets an international solo speed record over a 2,000 km (1,200 mi) course for an aircraft of its class, averaging 227.029 km/hr (141.07 mph).
  • 1938 – Former Soviet Air Force commander-in-chief Yakov Alksnis is executed, a victim of the Great Purge.
  • 1936 – Germany and Italy become the first countries to provide aircraft for service in the Spanish Civil War, when 10 German Junkers Ju 52 transports land in Spanish Morocco for service with the Nationalist faction and nine Italian Savoia-Marchetti SM.81 bombers arrive in Spain for Nationalist service; three other SM.81 s crash during the flight to Spain.
  • 1936 – (July 29-August 5) Ten, later increased to twenty, German Junkers Ju 52 s ferry 1,500 Spanish Nationalist troops from Spanish Morocco to Spain in the world’s first major military airlift.
  • 1930 – British airship R.100 makes a test flight to Montreal and back.
  • 1929 – A Ford Trimotor flown by Charles Lindbergh began the first coast-to-coast air passenger service through Transcontinental Air Transport (TWA).
  • 1920 – U. S. Postal Office’s first transcontinental airmail flight takes off from New York to San Francisco.
  • 1909 – Georges Legagneux makes the first airplane flight in Sweden in his Voisin biplane in Stockholm.

References[edit]

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{{#ifexpr:31>29

 |July 1
  • 2012 – A MAFFS-equipped Air Force Lockheed C-130H Hercules, assigned to the 145th Airlift Wing, North Carolina Air National Guard, crashed in southwest South Dakota while fighting White Draw Fire, killing four crew and seriously injuring two.
  • 2004 – Cassini – Huygens, flagship-class NASA-ESA-ASI spacecraft, enters into orbit around Saturn.
  • 2002America West Flight 556, an Airbus A319, is ordered back to the terminal at Miami before take-off after security screeners report that the pilots appear intoxicated; the pilots are eventually given prison sentences.
  • 2002 – In the Überlingen mid-air collision, Bashkirian Airlines Flight 2937, a Tupolev Tu-154 with 57 passengers and 14 crew members on board, collides with DHL Flight 611, a Boeing 757 cargo plane with 2 pilots on board near Lake Constance, Germany; all people on both planes perish.
  • 2000 – British Midland becomes the 15th airline to join the Star Alliance, the world's largest airline grouping.
  • 1998 – A MK.51 BAE Hawk, 'HW-324', c/n 312221, of the Finnish Air Force crashes into the forest near Luopioinen due to Engine failure. Both pilots ejected. One of the pilots sustained minor injuries.
  • 1997 – Launch: Space Shuttle Columbia STS-94 at 2:02:02 pm EDT. Mission highlights: Spacelab mission.
  • 1994 – Launch of Soyuz TM-19, Russian mission to the space station Mir.
  • 1993 – STS-57, Shuttle-Spacehab mission of Space Shuttle Endeavour, is back on earth
  • 1993 – Launch of Soyuz TM-17, Russian mission to the space station Mir.
  • 1989 – The crowd at the Paris air show is stunned when the Soviet Sukhoi Su27 performs its 'Cobra' manoeuvre. The Cobra sees the aircraft transfer from level flight to a vertical attitude and back to level flight with negligible changes in altitude.
  • 1988 – CAAC (Civil Aviation Administration of China), the Chinese state airline, changes its name to become Air China.
  • 1978 – Death of Kurt Arthur Benno Student, German WWI Flying ace, Luftwaffe general and commander of German Fallschirmjäger (Paratroopers) during WWII.
  • 1976 – The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution opens in Washington, D. C., United States, it is a center for research into the history and science of aviation and spaceflight, as well as planetary science and terrestrial geology and geophysics.
  • 1975 – First flight of the Valmet L-70 Vinka, a Finnish-designed piston-powered military basic trainer aircraft.
  • 1969 – Death of Will Hubbard, British WWI flying ace, who served in the RAAF in WWII.
  • 1965 – The U. S. Army combines the 11th Air Assault Division (Test) with the 2nd Infantry Division to form the first Cavalry Division (Airmobile), a unique division that includes three airborne-qualified battalions and several battalions of helicopters which are integral to its combat elements, allowing it to engage in helicopter assault operations.
  • 1965Continental Airlines Flight 12, a Boeing 707, runs off the end of the runway at Kansas City Downtown Airport, breaking into three pieces; all 66 on board survive.
  • 1961 – The Royal Air Force deploys Hawker Hunter combat aircraft to reinforce Kuwait, which is under threat from Iraq. Simultaneously it deploys Canberras and Valiant aircraft to Malta.
  • 1961 – The RAF deploys combat aircraft to reinforce Kuwait, which is under threat from Iraq.
  • 1957 – Death of August Heinrich Euler, German aviation pioneer and aircraft designer and holder of the first Germany Pilots license
  • 1955 – South Vietnam’s air force, the Vietnam Air Force, is established.
  • 1954 – Vought becomes an independent company for the first time since 1929, taking the name Chance Vought Incorporated.
  • 1954 – Second of 13 North American X-10s, GM-19308, c/n 2, on Navaho X-10 flight number 7, crashes and burns after 8 minutes of flight out of Edwards AFB, California, when a fire develops on board.
  • 1952 – No. 407 Squadron was reformed at Comox and equipped with Avro 683 Lancaster 10 MR aircraft.
  • 1952 – No. 434 Squadron was reformed at Uplands, Ottawa and equipped with North American Sabre fighters.
  • 1951 – Death of Maurizio Ramassotto, Early Italian aviator, and race car driver.
  • 1950 – The United States Air Force discontinues the Air Defense Command.
  • 1947 – The Philippine Air Force (PAF), air force of the Republic of the Philippines, is formed.
  • 1946 – The U. S. Navy establishes Experimental Squadron 3 (VX-3). Equipped with Piasecki HRP-1 Rescuer helicopters, it probably is the world’s first official all-helicopter squadron.
  • 1945 – (1-3) The U. S. Navy escort aircraft carriers USS Suwannee (CVE-27), USS Chenango (CVE-28), and USS Gilbert Islands (CVE-107) with Marine Air Group 2 embarked support Australian Army amphibious landings at Balikpapan, Borneo.
  • 1944Orenda Engines, Canadian aircraft engine manufacturer and parts supplier, is incorporated
  • 1943 – US Navy Consolidated PBY-5 Catalina, BuNo 04447, returning to NAS Pensacola, Florida, after anti-submarine patrol flight over the Gulf of Mexico, attempts ill-advised landing in a storm brought on by a passing weather front, hits swell, bounces twice and overturns in Pensacola Bay. Nose section breaks away right at the wing tower and sinks, taking with it U.S. Coast Guard Motor Machinists Mate Chief Dana W. Heckart, in the co-pilot's seat as a pilot trainee. Rest of crew, all U.S. Navy personnel, pilot Ltjg. John W. Nichols, Lt. Norman Bennett, Ens. Francis R. Young, AMM3c Van C. Hardin, AM3c William E. Mutch, AMM2c Robert H. Ovink, ASM3c Albert W. Smith, and ARM3c Ralph E. Stuckey, survive as rest of airframe floats. Hardin, Mutch, Ovink and Smith suffer minor injuries, rest of crew more seriously injured. A seaplane wrecking derrick (YSD) retrieves floating section the following day. Heckart's body never recovered. Investigation finds pilot Nichols at fault for trying to land in storm conditions.
  • 1943 – Municipal authorities in Hamburg, Germany, have logged 137 air attacks on the city and the deaths of 1,387 people and injuries to 4,496 in air raids since the beginning of World War II.
  • 1942 – The United States Army Air Forces establish the Air Transport Command, a centralized, strategic air transport service directed by the United States Department of War.
  • 1941 – No. 413 (Coastal) Squadron was formed in England.
  • 1933 – First flight of the Douglas DC-1, an American prototype and first model of the famous United States DC (Douglas Commercial) commercial transport aircraft series
  • 1933 – Start of the 2nd and ultimate air raid of Italo Balbo with 25 SIAI-Marchetti S.55X seaplanes (Air cruise of the decade) from Orbetello, Italy
  • 1931 – The first mail delivered by rocket in the United States is claimed by three Struthers, Ohio high school students led by philatelist, John Kiktavi. He sends mail from Struthers to Poland, Ohio.
  • 1929 – C. H. (“Punch”) Dickens was the first airman to reach any point on the western Canadian Arctic shore by air when he arrived at Aklavick, NWT 01 July 1929.
  • 1929 – Death of Wilmer Lower Stultz, American pioneering aviator, test pilot and raid pilot, killed in a crash during a test flight.
  • 1928 – The first aviation weather reports were sent through teletype from Washington, D. C. to stations in Cleveland, Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois.
  • 1927Richard Evelyn Byrd with crew (Balchen, Acosta, and Noville) with their Fokker F.VIIa/3m "America" arrive from Roosevelt Field East Garden City, New York over Paris. Cloud cover prevented a landing in Paris; they returned to the coast of Normandy, crash-landing near the beach at Ver-sur-Mer without fatalities
  • 1925 – The U. S. Air Mail Service begins overnight flights between New York and Chicago over the Allegheny Mountains.
  • 1920Belgium establishes the first internal air-service of any European colony with the Lara-Ligne Aérienne Roi Albert in Belgian Congo
  • 1918 – John Ingles Gilmour, Scottish WWI fighter ace, scores 5 on that single day.
  • 1916 – Roland Robert Tuck, British fighter ace during World War II was born.
  • 1916 – beginning of the Battle of the Somme. In the five months of the battle, the British lose 782 aircraft and 576 pilots but maintain air superiority over the battlefield.
  • 1915 – The United States Department of the Navy establishes an Office of Naval Aeronautics, the first formal recognition of naval aviation within the United States Navy bureaucracy.
  • 1915 – The French Navy seaplane carrier Pas-de-Calais is commissioned. She is the first paddle steamer to serve as an aviation vessel.
  • 1914 – The Naval Wing of the Royal Flying Corps is separated from the RFC and established it as a separate service, the Royal Naval Air Service, under the control of the Royal Navy.
  • 1914 – The United States Navy establishes its first air department, the Bureau of Aeronautics.
  • 1912Harriet Quimby, the first licensed female pilot in the United States, as part of an Air Show spectacular flew around the Boston Light. During the flight, her Berliot plane was caught in turbulent air and nose-dived, plummeting both Quimby and a meet organizer passenger to their deaths in Dorchester Bay.
  • 1911 – First US Navy airplane. Curtiss D Triad as Navy A-1, first flown by Lt T G Ellyson. This was followed by a Curtiss A-2 and Wright B-1.
  • 1893 – Birth of Mario de Bernardi, Italian WWI fighter pilot, seaplane air racer of the 1920s, and test pilot of early Italian experimental jets.
  • 1887 – Birth of Leighton Wilson Hazelhurst Jr., American aviation pioneer.
  • 1884 – Birth of René Caudron, French aviation pioneer and aircraft designer along with his brother Gaston.
  • 1872Louis Blériot, the pioneer aviator who made the world’s first airplane flight across the English Channel, is born in Cambrai, France. After experimenting first with gliders, he designed and built his own monoplane with a 25-hp engine, which took him across the channel.
  • 1862 – (1-2) The Confederate States Navy steamer Teaser operates a coal-gas silk observation balloon to reconnoitre Union Army positions along the James River in Virginia, the only use of a balloon by the Confederate States Navy. Her capture on July 4 by the steamer USS Maratanza ends Confederate naval balloon operations.

References[edit]

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July 31

  • 2012 – Due to confusion among air traffic controllers at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, two USAirways commuter jets take off into the path of a third USAirways commuter jet flying in the opposite direction and cleared to land on the same runway. Realizing their error, controllers order the inbound aircraft to take evasive action 12 seconds before it would have collided with the leading outbound jet. There are no injuries among the 192 people on the three aircraft.[2]
  • 2009 – An Indian Air Force HAL HPT-32 Deepak a prop-driven primary military trainer crashes in the Medak district of the Andhra Pradesh state killing the 2 crew.
  • 2007 – An AH-64 Apache goes down after coming under fire in eastern Baghdad. The two crew members were safely extracted.[3][4]
  • 1997FedEx Express Flight 14, a McDonnell Douglas MD-11, crashes upon landing at Newark Liberty International Airport; the two crewmembers and three passengers escape uninjured.
  • 1992 – Launch: Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-46 at 9:56:48 am EDT. Mission highlights: EURECA (European Retrievable Carrier) and the joint NASA/Italian Space Agency Tethered Satellite System (TSS).
  • 1992 – A US Navy Grumman E-2C Hawkeye of VAW-126 on a training flight crashes in the Atlantic Ocean ~75 miles N of Puerto Rico while returning to the USS John F. Kennedy, killing all five crew. The Navy reported on 1 August that the aircraft radioed that it was in trouble before coming down ~4 miles from the carrier, the second plane loss of that air wing in less than a fortnight. The aviators killed Friday were identified as Lt. Cmdr. Alan M. McLachlen, 33, of Virginia Beach, Virginia; Lt. Michael F. Horowitz, 27, of Atlanta, Georgia; Lt. Tristram E. Farmer, 26, of Trevett, Maine; Lt. j.g. Thomas D. Plautz, 28, of Norfolk, Virginia; and Lt. j.g. Richard Siter Jr., 24, of Latham, New York.
  • 1991 – Senate votes to allow women to fly combat aircraft.
  • 1984 – Venz commandos terminate hijacking of an aircraft, 2 killed.
  • 1981 – Panamanian Air Force FAP-205 crash: The leader of Panama, Omar Torrijos, is killed in the crash of a DeHavilland Twin Otter at Amador near Panama City, Panama.
  • 1981 – A Belgian Air Force Dassault Mirage VBR hits a radio mast at Dudelange, Luxembourg.
  • 1979Dan-Air Flight 0034, a Hawker Siddeley HS 748 failed to become airborne at Sumburgh Airport, Scotland. Of the 47 on board, 15 passengers and two crew die.
  • 1974 – A USN Grumman E-2 Hawkeye based at NAS Norfolk, Virginia, crashed on take-off from CGAS Elizabeth City, North Carolina during a touch-and-go, striking a maintenance facility, triggering a fire in a fibreglass and upholstery shop. Instructor pilot, three civilians killed, student pilot, and 12–18 others injured.
  • 1973Delta Air Lines Flight 723, a Douglas DC-9, descends prematurely and crashes on final approach to Boston Logan International Airport, killing all 89 on board; probable cause is unstabilized final approach by the flight crew.
  • 1972 – After 41 years in operation, Northeast Airlines completes its final day of service before being merged into Delta Air Lines the following day.
  • 1972Delta Air Lines Flight 841 was an aircraft hijacking that took place beginning on Monday, on a flight originally from Detroit to Miami. Members of the Black Liberation Army took over the airplane in flight using weapons smuggled on board, including a bible cut out to hold a handgun. The DC-8 held 7 crew and 94 passengers, none of whom were killed during the hijacking. Five hijackers who had boarded with three children took over the plane. The plane flew to Miami where the 86 hostage-held passengers (i. e. 94 minus 8) were released in exchange for $1 million in ransom. The plane was then flown on to Boston where it refueled before flying to Algeria. Algerian authorities seized the plane and ransom which they returned to the U. S. but the hijackers were released after a few days.
  • 1964 – A. H. Parker sets a new sailplane distance record of 1,000 km (621 miles) in a Sisu-1 A
  • 1964 – Ranger 7 sends back the first ever close-up photographs of the moon, with images 1,000 times clearer than anything ever seen from earth-bound telescopes.
  • 1964 – A/M CR Dunlap retired as Chief of the Air Staff and became Deputy Commander of NORAD.
  • 1964 – Country music star Jim Reeves and his manager die in the crash of a Beechcraft Debonair Reeves is piloting near Brentwood, Tennessee.
  • 1957 – The Distant Early Warning Line, a system of radar stations designed to detect Soviet bombers approaching North America, went into operation.
  • 1956 – In a high-speed flight, prototype Folland Gnat, G-39-2, suffers tailplane flutter which breaks away. Folland test pilot bails out and descends safely, becoming first person to use the Folland/Saab ejection seat in action.
  • 1948 – President Harry Truman helped dedicate New York International Airport (later John F. Kennedy International Airport) at Idlewild Field.
  • 1945 – Since beginning the strategic bombing campaign against Japan in June 1944, B-29 s of the U. S. Army’s Twentieth Air Force have destroyed 90 Japanese cities, leaving only four major cities – Kyoto, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Sapporo – undamaged. During July 1945, the B-29 s have carried an average bombload of 7.4 tons (6,713 kg) per plane – An increase of 4.8 tons (4,355 kg) since November 1944 – dropped more than 75 percent of their bombs by radar, and suffered a loss rate of only 0.4 percent of aircraft raiding Japan (down from 5.7 percvent in January 1945).
  • 1944 – Noted aviation pioneer and author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry vanishes without a trace while flying a Free French Forces Lockheed F-5B-1-LO, 42-68223, c/n 2734, of II/33 Squadron, out of Borgo-Porreta, Bastia, Corsica, a reconnaissance variant of the P-38 Lightning, over the Mediterranean; his fate remains a mystery until 2004 when the wreckage of his plane is discovered. While the cause of the crash is unknown, analysis of the wreckage and enemy wartime records suggests that the crash was an accident unrelated to enemy action. A former Luftwaffe pilot has published a volume in which he claims to have shot down a French-marked Lightning, but his claim is largely discounted.
  • 1943 – German aircraft attack U. S. Navy warships bombarding coastal artillery batteries near San Stéfano di Camastra, Sicily, but score no hits.
  • 1943 – The U. S. Army Forces’ Eleventh Air Force has carried out even more combat sorties against Japanese forces on Kiska in the Aleutian Islands in July than it had in June.
  • 1943 – The first prototype Focke-Wulf Ta 154 V1, TE+FE, powered by Jumo 211R engines, first flown 1 July 1943, tested at Rechlin, is written off in a landing accident this date when the undercarriage collapsed. This was a recurrent problem that accounted for the loss of several of the type.
  • 1942 – The vast, 800 km (500 mi) searchlight belt Germany has developed to guide night fighters to British bombers along their routes into and out of Germany is ordered disbanded so that the searchlights may be reallocated to the point defense of individual German cities. The searchlight belt is replaced by an even deeper belt of ground radars, allowing far more radar-controlled interception of enemy aircraft by German night fighters.
  • 1941 – A chartered Philippine Airlines Douglas DC-4 ferries 40 American servicemen to Oakland, California, from Nielson Airport in Makati City, Manila, in the Philippine Islands with stops at Guam, Wake Island, Johnston Atoll, and Honolulu in the Territory of Hawaii. The flight makes Philippine Airlines, Asia’s first airline, the first Asian airline to cross the Pacific Ocean. Philippine Airlines will begin a scheduled transpacific service in December 1941.
  • 1936 – (July 31-August 8) France becomes the first country to supply aircraft to the Republican faction in Spain, delivering 70 planes, including Bloch MB.200 s, Potez 54 s, and Dewoitine D.371 s.
  • 1936 – The Jersey Airways Saro A.19 Cloud amphibian airliner Cloud of Iona (tail number G-ABXW) disappears during a stormy evening on a flight from Guernsey to Jersey in the Channel Islands with the loss of all eight people on board. An investigation determines that the plane had lost engine power, landed on the sea, and been swamped by waves.
  • 1930 – First dirigible takeoff and landing on an oceangoing vessel.
  • 1918 – Lt Frank Linke-Crawford, Austrian 4th highest scoring ace, is shot down in combat. He had scored 27 victories.
  • 1918 – An aircraft takes off from platform installed on a towed lighter for the first time, when Royal Air Force Lieutenant Stewart Culley takes off in a Sopwith Camel from a lighter towed behind a British warship.
  • 1918 – A Royal Air Force bombing raid over Germany by 12 Airco DH.9 s suffers the loss of 10 aircraft shot down.
  • 1913 – Alys McKey Bryant becomes the first woman pilot to fly in Canada, over Vancouver, in a Curtiss-type pusher biplane.
  • 1912 – An attempt by the U.S. Navy to catapult launch the Navy's first seaplane, a Curtiss A-3 (AH-3) pusher, at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., fails when a crosswind catches the plane halfway along the catapult and tosses it into the Anacostia River. Pilot uninjured. A different source lists the location of the launch attempt as Annapolis, Maryland, the aircraft as the Curtiss A-1 (AH-1), and the pilot as Lt. Theodore G. Ellyson, noting that the catapult was powered by compressed air, was fabricated by the Naval Gun Factory at the Washington Navy Yard from a design by Capt. Washington I. Chambers, and that the aircraft, not being secured to the catapult, reared up at mid-stroke where it was caught by the crosswind. This account, from an official U.S. Navy history, may be the more credible of the two versions. An accompanying photo (No. 650864) dated July 1912 showing the A-1 on the catapult at Annapolis supports the latter description. The first successful launch was accomplished on 12 November 1912 at the Washington Navy Yard by Ellyson in the A-3, according to this source, possibly accounting for the confusion.
  • 1901 – German meteorologists Berson and Süring climb to 10,800 m in a free balloon.
  • 1894Hiram Maxim launches an enormous biplane test rig (wingspan 32 m, 105 ft) propelled by two steam engines. It makes a short captive hop after running down a length of railway track. After that he stopped his experiments, which had already cost him around thirty thousands pounds.
  • 1879 – Richard Cowen and Charles Page flew the Canadian, the first balloon to be built in Canada.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Firing Offenses: Ways You Don't Expect Your Military Career to End," The Washington Post Express, August 2, 2012, p. 2.
  2. ^ Ashley Halsey III (August 1, 2012). "Two planes taking off from National put on collision course with plane trying to land". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  3. ^ Kim Gamel (2007-08-10). "U.S. helicopter forced down in Iraq". Associated Press. Retrieved 2007-08-10. 
  4. ^ "Second Predator crashes in Iraq in two days". Air Force Print News. 2007-07-31. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 

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