Portal:Buenos Aires

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Buenos Aires

Flag of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Coat of Arms of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city of Argentina, and the second-largest metropolitan area in South America, after Greater São Paulo. It is located on the western shore of the estuary of the Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of the South American continent. Greater Buenos Aires conurbation, which also includes several provincial partidos, constitutes the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around thirteen million. People from Buenos Aires are referred to as porteños (people of the port). Buenos Aires is a top tourist destination, and is known for its European style architecture and rich cultural life, with the highest concentration of theatres in the world.
Obelisco de Buenos Aires.jpg More about… the City of Buenos Aires
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The open cabildo on May 22, 1810, by Pedro Subercaseaux, depiction of the May 22 open cabildo
The May Revolution (Spanish: Revolución de Mayo) was a week-long series of events that took place from May 18 to 25, 1810, in Buenos Aires, capital of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. This Spanish colony included roughly the territories of present-day Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. The result was the removal of Viceroy Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros and the establishment of a local government, the Primera Junta (First Junta), on May 25.

The May Revolution was a direct reaction to Spain's Peninsular War. In 1808, King Ferdinand VII of Spain abdicated in favor of Napoleon, who granted the throne to his brother, Joseph Bonaparte. A Supreme Central Junta led resistance to Joseph's government and the French occupation of Spain, but eventually suffered a series of reversals that resulted in the Spanish loss of the northern half of the country. On February 1, 1810, French troops took Seville and gained control of most of Andalusia. The Supreme Junta retreated to Cadiz and dissolved itself, and the Council of Regency of Spain and the Indies replaced it. News of these events arrived in Buenos Aires on May 18, brought by British ships.

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The Woman's Bridge in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires
Credit: Norberto Kolus

Donated by Alberto L. González to the City of Buenos Aires in gratitude for 60 years of work in the country, and designed by Santiago Calatrava, the Woman's Bridge spans Dock 3 in Puerto Madero, being not only a Cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge type footbridge, but also a swing bridge, somewhat unique in its asymmetrical arrangement.

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1859 1p "In Ps" tete-beche pair of stamps issues by the State of Buenos Aires

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Colegiales is a barrio or district in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It is located between Alvarez Thomas av., Forest av., De los Incas av., Virrey del Pino st., Cabildo av., Jorge Newbery st., Crámer st. and Dorrego av. This neighbourhood offers a vast amount of contrast and opportunities. There are large and tall buildings that go from the Crámer street to Avenida Cabildo and traditional houses up to three stories. This district has become a busy one with lots of pedestrians and cars that go about on the streets. This neighbourhood is mainly residential, with some non-residential areas like the classification yard in the north-east zone, the fairs in the south-west (where until late 60's there was another classification yard) and the UCA grounds in south-east.

The Colegiales Athletic and Social Club is probably the neighborhood's favorite social venue. Located on 2860 Teodoro García Street, it was famous in decades past for Roberto "Polaco" Goyeneche's frequent Tango recitals there. Colegiales was also home to the city's first cinema, "Las Familias." The cinema was probably better-known, however, for the people who had it built than for its distinction as a historical first. Though now a distant memory, the colorful Anselmis entertained generations of locals with their namesake circus on Lacroze and Cabildo Avenues.

Administrative divisions:

  1. Puerto Madero, San Nicolás, Retiro, Monserrat, San Telmo, and Constitución
  2. Recoleta
  3. Balvanera and San Cristóbal
  4. La Boca, Barracas, Parque Patricios, and Nueva Pompeya
  5. Almagro and Boedo
  6. Caballito
  7. Flores and Parque Chacabuco
  8. Villa Soldati, Villa Lugano, and Villa Riachuelo
  9. Parque Avellaneda, Mataderos, and Liniers
  10. Villa Luro, Vélez Sársfield, Floresta, Monte Castro, Villa Real, and Versalles
  11. Villa Devoto, Villa del Parque, Villa Santa Rita, and Villa General Mitre
  12. Villa Pueyrredón, Villa Urquiza, Coghlan, and Saavedra
  13. Núñez, Belgrano, and Colegiales
  14. Palermo
  15. Villa Ortúzar, Chacarita, Villa Crespo, La Paternal, Agronomía and Parque Chas
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