Portal:Cape Verde

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Cape Verde

Flag of Cape Verde
Coat of arms of Cape Verde
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Cape Verde (/ˈvɜːrd(i)/ (About this soundlisten)) or Cabo Verde (/ˌkɑːb ˈvɜːrd/ (About this soundlisten), /ˌkæb-/) (Portuguese: Cabo Verde, pronounced [ˈkabu ˈveɾdɨ]), officially the Republic of Cabo Verde, is an island country spanning an archipelago of 10 volcanic islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. It forms part of the Macaronesia ecoregion, along with the Azores, Canary Islands, Madeira, and the Savage Isles. In ancient times these islands were referred to as "the Islands of the Blessed" or the "Fortunate Isles". Located 570 kilometres (350 mi) west of the Cape Verde Peninsula in West Africa, the islands cover a combined area of slightly over 4,000 square kilometres (1,500 sq mi).

The Cape Verde archipelago was uninhabited until the 15th century, when Portuguese explorers discovered and colonized the islands, establishing the first European settlement in the tropics. Ideally located for the Atlantic slave trade, the islands grew prosperous throughout the 16th and 17th centuries, attracting merchants, privateers, and pirates. The end of slavery in the 19th century led to economic decline and emigration. Cape Verde gradually recovered as an important commercial center and stopover for shipping routes. Incorporated as an overseas department of Portugal in 1951, the islands continued to campaign for independence, which was peacefully achieved in 1975.

Since the early 1990s, Cape Verde has been a stable representative democracy, and remains one of the most developed and democratic countries in Africa. Lacking natural resources, its developing economy is mostly service-oriented, with a growing focus on tourism and foreign investment. Its population of around 540,000 is mostly of mixed European, Moorish, Arab and African heritage, and predominantly Roman Catholic, reflecting the legacy of Portuguese rule. A sizeable diaspora community exists across the world, slightly outnumbering inhabitants on the islands.

Historically, the name "Cape Verde" has been used in English for the archipelago and, since independence in 1975, for the country. In 2013, the Cape Verdean government determined that the Portuguese designation Cabo Verde would henceforth be used for official purposes, such as at the United Nations, even in English contexts. Cape Verde is a member of the African Union.

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Mindelo harbour - São Vicente, Cape Verde
The view over Mindelo harbour on the island of São Vicente in the archipelago of Cape Verde off the west coast of Africa.

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Cachupa

Cachupa is a famous dish from the Cape Verde islands, West Africa. This slow cooked stew of corn (hominy), beans, and fish or meat (sausage, beef, goat, or chicken) is often referred to as the country's national dish.[1] Each island has its own regional variation. It is hearty and filling, and may even be served reheated at breakfast.

The version of the recipe called "Cachupa Rica" tends to have more ingredients than the simpler, "Cachupa Pobre".

Selected Island

The Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão
Vale da Ribeira Grande, Santo Antão, Cabo Verde

Santo Antão (Portuguese for "Saint Anthony"), or Sontonton in Cape Verdean Creole, is the westernmost and largest of the Barlavento islands of Cape Verde. The nearest main island is São Vicente to the southeast, separated by a channel named Canal de São Vicente. It is the westernmost large island in Cape Verde and the continent of Africa, and the second largest in Cape Verde.

The island, entirely made up of volcanic material. The tallest mountain is Topo de Coroa, reaching a height of 1,979 m. The second tallest is Pico da Cruz at 1,585 m. The island is divided into north and south by a mountain range long considered impenetrable but now crossed by a road. The island’s main town is Ponta do Sol on the north coast, home to an airport, while its ferry port is Porto Novo on the south coast. A part of the island in the southeast has an arid climate, while the northwest receives relatively normal precipitation. Its valleys are suffering heavy erosion.

In the news

Selected biography

Pedro Verona Rodrigues Pires

Pedro Verona Rodrigues Pires (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpedɾu vɨˈɾonɐ ʁuˈdɾiɡɨʃ ˈpiɾɨʃ]; born 29 April 1934) has been the President of Cape Verde since March 2001. Before becoming President he was Prime Minister from 1975 to 1991.

After the ruling African Party for the Independence of Cape Verde (PAICV) decided to institute multiparty democracy in February 1990, Pires replaced President Aristides Pereira as General Secretary of PAICV in August 1990. The PAICV lost the multiparty parliamentary and presidential elections held in early 1991 and was left in opposition. At a party congress in August 1993, Pires was replaced as General Secretary by Aristides Lima and was instead elected as President of PAICV.[2] As a candidate for the party presidency at PAICV's September 1997 congress, he faced José Maria Neves[3] and prevailed with 68% of the vote.[4] He stepped down as PAICV President in 2000 in preparation for a presidential bid in the next year's election[5] and he was succeeded by Neves.[2] He announced his candidacy for the Presidency of Cape Verde on September 5, 2000.[6]

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  1. ^ [1] at www.umassd.edu
  2. ^ a b Political Parties of the World (6th edition, 2005), ed. Bogdan Szajkowski, page 113.
  3. ^ "Cape Verde: Opposition party congress opens", Radio Renascenca, Lisbon (nl.newsbank.com), September 19, 1997.
  4. ^ "Cape Verde: Former PM elected leader of main opposition PAICV party", Radio Renascenca, Lisbon (nl.newsbank.com), September 22, 1997.
  5. ^ "Cape Verde: Town council leader to run for PAIGC party leadership", RDP Africa web site (nl.newsbank.com), May 29, 2000.
  6. ^ "Cape Verde: Former prime minister Pires to run for president in 2001 poll", RDP Africa web site (nl.newsbank.com), September 6, 2000.