Portal:Cornwall

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Helford River Cropped.jpg

Flag of Cornwall Porth Kernow a'gas dynnargh!
Welcome to the Cornwall Portal!
St Piran's Flag of Cornwall

Cornwall (/ˈkɔːrnwɔːl, -wəl/; Cornish: Kernow [ˈkɛrnɔʊ]) is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom. The county is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar which forms most of the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The furthest southwestern point of the island is Land's End; the southernmost point is Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 563,600 and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately. The administrative centre of Cornwall, and its only city, is Truro.

Cornwall is the homeland of the Cornish people and the cultural and ethnic origin of the Cornish diaspora. It retains a distinct cultural identity that reflects its unique history, and is recognised as one of the Celtic nations with a rich cultural heritage. It was formerly a Brythonic kingdom and subsequently a royal duchy. The Cornish nationalist movement contests the present constitutional status of Cornwall and seeks greater autonomy within the United Kingdom in the form of a devolved legislative Cornish Assembly with powers similar to those in Wales and Scotland. In 2014, Cornish people were granted minority status under the European Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, giving them recognition as a distinct ethnic group. Read more...

Selected article

Looking towards Newquay Harbour

Newquay (/ˈnjki/ NEW-kee; Cornish: Tewynblustri) is a town in the south west of England, in the United Kingdom. It is a civil parish, seaside resort, regional centre for aerospace industries, future spaceport and a fishing port on the North Atlantic coast of Cornwall, approximately 12 miles (19 km) north of Truro and 20 miles (32 km) west of Bodmin.

The town is bounded to the south by the River Gannel and its associated salt marsh, and to the north-east by the Porth Valley. The western edge of the town meets the Atlantic at Fistral Bay.

The town has been expanding inland (south) since the former fishing village of New Quay began to grow in the second half of the nineteenth century.

In 2001, the census recorded a permanent population of 19,562, increasing to 20,342 at the 2011 census. Recent estimates suggest that the total for the wider Newquay area would rise to 27,862 by 2018 and 30,341 in 2019. Read more...

Selected biography

Sir Humphry Davy, Bt
by Thomas Phillips

Sir Humphry Davy, 1st Baronet PRS MRIA FGS FRS (17 December 1778 – 29 May 1829) was a Cornish chemist and inventor, who is best remembered today for isolating, using electricity, a series of elements for the first time: potassium and sodium in 1807 and calcium, strontium, barium, magnesium and boron the following year, as well as discovering the elemental nature of chlorine and iodine. He also studied the forces involved in these separations, inventing the new field of electrochemistry. In 1799 Davy experimented with nitrous oxide and became astonished that it made him laugh, so he nicknamed it "laughing gas", and wrote about its potential anaesthetic properties in relieving pain during surgery.

Berzelius called Davy's 1806 Bakerian Lecture On Some Chemical Agencies of Electricity "one of the best memoirs which has ever enriched the theory of chemistry." Davy was a baronet, President of the Royal Society (PRS), Member of the Royal Irish Academy (MRIA), and Fellow of the Geological Society (FGS). He also invented the Davy lamp and a very early form of incandescent light bulb.

He joked that his assistant Michael Faraday was his greatest discovery. Read more...

Selected picture

Morvah Methodist chapel

Photo credit: Tim

A Methodist chapel in Morvah, with an Anglican church behind. The Methodism of John Wesley proved to be very popular with the working classes in Cornwall in the 19th century, becoming the leading form of Christianity. The chapels became important social centres, with male voice choirs and other church-affiliated groups playing a central role in the social lives of working class Cornishmen.

Other projects

Did you know?

St Buryan's Church

Selected quote

Henry Jenner
The whole object of my life has been to inculcate into Cornish people a sense of their Cornishness."
Henry JennerCeltic scholar, Cornish activist, and originator of the Cornish language revival

Things you can do

Things you can do

Places

  • Create Articles for listed buildings in Cornwall.
  • Create Articles for conservation areas in Cornwall.
  • Create Articles for public parks in Cornwall.
  • Create Articles for historic sites, particularly hill-forts.


Flora and Fauna

Maintenance

People

  • Create Articles for notable Cornish politicians.
  • Expand Alfred Aaron de Pass and add more info on him to the institutions he donated art and money to in Cornwall (RIC, Falmouth Gallery etc).
  • Create Articles for notable Cornish artists.

Organisations

  • Create Articles for local groups and charities.
  • Create Articles for notable art galleries.

History, Language, Culture and Art

Translations

  • Illustrate the new Russian article Корнцы if you can work with Russian Cyrillic script

Recognised content

Featured articles

Main page featured articles

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Good articles

Topics

History

Geography

Politics

Economy and demographics

Culture

Subcategories

Subcategories

Wikipedia in Cornish

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

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References