Portal:Drink

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The Drink Portal

A portal dedicated to all beverages

Introduction

A drink, in this case a glass of port wine.

A drink (or beverage) is a liquid intended for human consumption. In addition to their basic function of satisfying thirst, drinks play important roles in human culture. Common types of drinks include plain drinking water, milk, coffee, tea, hot chocolate, juice and soft drinks. In addition, alcoholic drinks such as wine, beer, and liquor, which contain the drug ethanol, have been part of human culture for more than 8,000 years.

Non-alcoholic drinks often signify drinks that would normally contain alcohol, such as beer and wine, but are made with a sufficiently low concentration of alcohol by volume. The category includes drinks that have undergone an alcohol removal process such as non-alcoholic beers and de-alcoholized wines. (Full article...)

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A rum and coke cocktail
A rum and coke cocktail
Rum and Coke, or the Cuba libre (/ˈkjuːbə ˈlbr/ KEW-bə LEE-bray, Spanish: [ˈkuβa ˈliβɾe]; literally "Free Cuba"), is a highball cocktail consisting of cola, rum, and in many recipes lime juice on ice. Traditionally, the cola ingredient is Coca-Cola ("Coke") and the alcohol is a light rum such as Bacardi. However, the drink may be made with various types of rums and cola brands, and lime juice may or may not be included.

The cocktail originated in the early 20th century in Cuba, after the country won independence in the Spanish–American War. It subsequently became popular across Cuba, the United States, and other countries. Its simple recipe and inexpensive, ubiquitous ingredients have made it one of the world's most-popular alcoholic drinks. Drink critics often consider the drink mediocre, but it has been noted for its historical significance. (Full article...) (Full article...)

General images

The following are images from various drink-related articles on Wikipedia.

Did you know...

... that 7-Up originally contained lithium citrate, a mood-stabilizing drug?
Other "Did you know" facts... Read more...

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A glass of mineral water being poured

Selected biography - show another

Paul Draper thieving wine from a barrel at Ridge Monte Bello.
Paul Draper (born March 10, 1936) is a California winemaker who has been the chief winemaker at Ridge Vineyards in California since 1969. Without any formal training in winemaking, Draper first gained recognition for his 1971 Monte Bello Cabernet Sauvignon when it placed fifth at the Judgment of Paris wine tasting. Draper has played a significant role in the history of California wine through his pioneering work in popularizing "vineyard-designated" wines as well as instigating the resurgence of old vine Zinfandel. Along with Ravenswood Winery's Joel Peterson, Draper is considered one of the most important figures in the history of Californian Zinfandel, rescuing the grape from obscurity and demonstrating its full potential as a serious wine. Draper was featured in a short film titled Terroir and directed by Christopher McGilvray which was shown at the 2017 Cinequest Film Festival. (Full article...)

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...good company, good wine, good welcome, can make good people.
— William Shakespeare
Henry VIII

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High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), also known as glucose-fructose, isoglucose and glucose-fructose syrup, is a sweetener made from corn starch. As in the production of conventional corn syrup, the starch is broken down into glucose by enzymes. To make HFCS, the corn syrup is further processed by glucose isomerase to convert some of its glucose into fructose. HFCS was first marketed in the early 1970s by the Clinton Corn Processing Company, together with the Japanese Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, where the enzyme was discovered in 1965.

As a sweetener, HFCS is often compared to granulated sugar, but manufacturing advantages of HFCS over sugar include that it is easier to handle[how?] and cheaper. "HFCS 42" and "HFCS 55" refer to dry weight fructose compositions of 42% and 55% respectively, the rest being glucose. HFCS 42 is mainly used for processed foods and breakfast cereals, whereas HFCS 55 is used mostly for production of soft drinks.

The United States Food and Drug Administration states that HFCS is a safe ingredient for food and beverage manufacturing. Uses and exports of HFCS from American producers have grown steadily during the early 21st century.
Used in Soft drinks.
(Full article...)

Topics related to Beverages

The following are topics relating to drinks:

General topics: Bartending  • Bottling • Drinking • Drinking water • Bottled water • Mineral water • Coffee • Energy drink • Juice • Tea • Milk • Plant milk • Pasteurization • Refrigeration • Steeping • Water purification
Alcoholic beverages: Beer • Brandy • Brewing • Caffeinated alcoholic drinks • Cider • Cocktails • Distillation • Fermentation • Hard soda • Liquor • Liqueur • Malt drink • Mead • Proof • Rice Wine • Schnapps • Vodka • Whiskey • Wine
Soft Drinks: Carbonation • Cola • Orange soft drink • Frozen carbonated drink • Root beer • Soda water • Lithia water •
Miscellaneous: Drink industry • Lemonade • Limeade • Orange drink • Slush (beverage)

Drink lists

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The following are list articles relating to drinks. See Category:Lists of drinks for additional articles.

Subcategories

Related WikiProjects

Parent project: WikiProject Food and Drink
WikiProjects
Related projects:
Child projects: Task forces: (All inactive)
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Drink and Beverage WikiProjects

Goblet Glass (Banquet).svg

WikiProject Food & Drink is an association of Wikipedians with an interest in culinary-related subjects. They have come together to co-ordinate the development of food and drink articles here on Wikipedia as well as the many subjects related to food such as foodservice, catering and restaurants. If you wish to learn more about these subjects as well as get involved, please visit the Food & Drink Wikiproject page to see how you can help!

Beyond general culinary interests, Wikipedians have banded together for beverage-specific projects. If any of these subjects pique your interest, please feel free to visit their projects.

Stein Glass (Beer).svg WikiProject Beer – covers Wikipedia's coverage of beer and breweries and microbreweries

Goblet Glass (Teardrop).svg WikiProject Wine – aims to compile thorough and accurate information on different vineyards, wineries and varieties of wines, including but not limited to their qualities, origins, and uses.

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