Portal:East Frisia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Subject area: East Frisia:  Portal | Project pages | Contact | Our best | Category
East Frisian flag and coat of arms
East Frisia Portal
Portal:East Frisia
Pilsum: lighthouseJuist: beachGreetsiel: the twin windmillsEmden: Ratsdelft
"Moin" and welcome!

The East Frisia portal offers an overview of the most important and newest articles on the subject of East Frisia, a unique historic and cultural region in North Germany on the North Sea coast. The portal contains links to a cross-section of articles from the areas of history and politics, geography and economy, art and culture, and some of the important personalities of the region.

Geography and nature
Leer: Town hall and recreational harbour (behind)
Spiekeroog: Aerial photograph from the west
Norden: The "Three Sisters" (Dree Süsters) on the market place

East Frisia is a region in the northwest of Germany, on the North Sea coast. The East Frisian Islands just off the mainland belong to the region. Beyond the line of dykes is the coastline, directly affected by the tide, and the mudflats of the Wadden Sea. The mainland is characterised by marshes, geest and moorland; the islands by dunes. The region is divided into the three districts of Aurich, Leer and Wittmund and the town of Emden.

Towns: Aurich | Borkum | Emden | Esens | Leer | Norden | Norderney | Weener | Wiesmoor | Wittmund

Municipalities:

Lakes and rivers: Harle | Lower Saxon Wadden Sea National Park | Dollart | Leybucht | Ems | Leda | Jümme | Großes Meer

Regions: Auricherland | Brokmerland | East Frisian peninsula | Emsigerland | Harlingerland | Norderland | Rheiderland

Islands, sandbanks and Platen: Borkum | Juist | Norderney | Baltrum | Langeoog | Spiekeroog | Memmert | Lütje Hörn | Kachelotplate

History
The Upstalsboom as a historic place of assembly
Battle on the Wild Fields

The history of East Frisia is marked by centuries of struggle by its people against storms and flooding from the sea, by the emergence of the concept of "Frisian freedom" in the Middle Ages and by the relative isolation of the region by moors. As a political entity the County of East Frisia appeared in 1464 on the imperial stage. After 1744 it belonged in succession to Prussia, the Kingdom of Holland, France, the Kingdom of Hanover and again to Prussia. Since 1946 the region has been part of the state of Lower Saxony. The dissolution of the province of Aurich in 1978 ended the history of East Frisia as a political and administrative unit.

General history: History of East Frisia | Eala Frya Fresena | Frisian freedom | Grote Mandrenke | Christmas flood of 1717

History of towns and regions: History of the Brookmerland

Military history: Battle of Detern | Frisian-Frankish wars | Friso-Hollandic wars

Art and culture
The Leaning Tower of Suurhusen
Main castle building of the Norderburg in Dornum

The region has a large number of historic buildings, including castles and palaces, Gulf farmhouses and town houses. A number of museums and libraries have national significance. Around 100 churches date to the Romanesque and Gothic periods and many house valuable organs. The East Frisian Regional Association (Ostfriesische Landschaft) supports local culture as well as the preservation of the plattdeutsch language.

Museums, libraries and archives:

Castles: Berum Castle | Evenburg | Haneburg | Harderwykenburg

Other buildings: Gulf farmhouse | Leaning Tower of Suurhusen

Language: Moin | East Frisian Low Saxon | East Frisian language

Religion: Evangelical Reformed Church

Customs and culture: East Frisian jokes | Maibaum | Martinisingen

Sport: Kickers Emden | Boßeln | Klootschießen

East Frisian biographies
Ubbo Emmius

In the course of the previous centuries East Frisia has produced a number of notable people. In many cases they began or pursued their careers outside the region. See also: List of East Frisian people

Chieftains: Aldgisl | Focko Ukena | Ocko I tom Brok | Ocko II tom Brok | tom Brok

Nobility: Counts of East Frisia | Anna of Oldenburg | Edzard the Great | Edzard II | Enno II | Enno III | Enno Louis | Rudolf Christian | Ulrich I | Ulrich II

Science: Hermann Conring | Rudolf Eucken | Johannes Fabricius | Rudolf von Jhering | Onno Klopp | Johann Christian Reil

Theology: Menso Alting | Ubbo Emmius

Culture: Ludolf Bakhuizen | Karl Dall | Henri Nannen | Wolfgang Petersen | Otto Waalkes

Politics: Garrelt Duin

Sport: Dieter Eilts | Marco Kutscher | Heidi Hartmann | Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt

Economy and transport
Enercon
A car transporter leaves Emden Harbour

East Frisia's economy is dominated by agriculture, tourism and several manufacturing and service industries. Amongst the largest industrial concerns are a Volkswagen factory and a wind energy system manufacturer. The economic hub of the region is Emden. Shipping has been a tradition in East Frisia for centuries. The town of Leer is one of the largest German shipping company centres. In the 1850s the region began to be opened up by the railway and has been linked to the motorway network since the 1970s.

Businesses: Enercon | Nordseewerke | Ostfriesische Lufttransport | Luftverkehr Friesland Harle

Public services: Richthofen Squadron | Lower Saxon State Department for Waterway, Coastal and Nature Conservation

Media:

Transport: A 28 | A 31 | A 280 | Emden Airfield

Pictogram voting info.svg Info: The members and supporters of the East Frisia portal are listed here by topic and geographical assignment.

Information on missing articles is given here.

Your questions about East Frisia may be answered at the talk page.

Image of the month
Nebelostfriesland.jpg
Morning mist in East Frisia

East Frisia or Eastern Friesland (German: Ostfriesland) is a historic, coastal region in the northwest of the German state of Lower Saxony. Today its picturesque landscape and offshore islands are popular with tourists. more…

Article of the month
Map of Borkum

Borkum is the westernmost and largest of the seven inhabited East Frisian Islands with an area of just under 31 square kilometres. Parts of the island and the neighbouring mudflats belong to the Lower Saxon Wadden Sea National Park. The island is also the site of the town of Borkum, which is a state-recognised North Sea spa town with numerous spa facilities.

Like all the other East Frisian Islands Borkum led a shadowy political and economic existence in the County of East Frisia within the Kingdom of Prussia until the upsurge in bathing in the 19th century. One exception was whale fishing on Borkum, which helped the island to become fairly wealthy in the 18th century, but which came to an end in 1782. The subsequent economic depression lasted several decades. Not until the advent of bathing tourism from around 1830, which took off after about 1870, was the situation reversed. The island has been almost entirely dependent on tourism since that time, enabling its inhabitants to earn a regular income. In 2011 249,742 holidaymakers visited Borkum spending a total of 2,266,456 nights on the island. more…

Did you know, that...?

... the 71st Tactical Fighter Squadron, based at Wittmund in East Frisia, was given the honorary title of Richthofen in 1964 in memory of the Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen? more…


New and expanded articles

The following are articles, related to East Frisia, added in the last six months.

All articles on East Frisia are here;
Articles on East Frisian people are here.
Missing articles

The following are wanted articles, related to East Frisia, that exist on German Wikipedia.