Portal:Kilkenny

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Kilkenny portal

Kilkenny County Crest
Kilkenny City Crest
Brandon Hill
Flag of Kilkenny

The Kilkenny Portal (Monthly, Daily and Hourly editions)

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This portal is for articles relevant to city, the county, and the Cats.
Panorama of Kilkenny city


Pasture at Listerlin, County Kilkenny

B-Class article County Kilkenny (Irish: Contae Chill Chainnigh) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the South-East Region. It is named after the city of Kilkenny. The county was based on the historic Gaelic kingdom of Ossory (Osraige), which is also the basis of the Diocese of Ossory. Kilkenny County Council is the local authority for the county. According to the 2011 census the population of the county is 95,419.

The River Nore flows through the county and the River Suir forms the border with County Waterford. Brandon Hill is the highest point with an elevation of 515 m (1,690 ft).


Kilkenny

B-Class article In hurling, the dominant sport in the county, Kilkenny GAA compete annually in the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, which they have won thirty-two times, the Leinster Senior Hurling Championship, which they have won sixty-six times, and the National Hurling League, which they have won fourteen times. Kilkenny, along with Cork and Tipperary, are regarded as 'the Big Three' in the world of hurling. Brian Cody has been manager of the Kilkenny senior hurling team since 1998. The 2010 senior hurling captain is T. J. Reid. The minor team, captained by Cillian Buckley has also had success, winning its 20th All-Ireland title in 2010.



Selected article

Pasture at Listerlin, County Kilkenny

B-Class article County Kilkenny (Irish: Contae Chill Chainnigh) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the South-East Region. It is named after the city of Kilkenny. The county was based on the historic Gaelic kingdom of Ossory (Osraige), which is also the basis of the Diocese of Ossory. Kilkenny County Council is the local authority for the county. According to the 2011 census the population of the county is 95,419.

The River Nore flows through the county and the River Suir forms the border with County Waterford. Brandon Hill is the highest point with an elevation of 515 m (1,690 ft).


Selected structure

Start-Class article The Church of Saint John the Evangelist, or John's Church, is a Gothic Revival style church in Kilkenny, Ireland. The Church was built from 1903 to 1908 on the site of an earlier church located in the graveyard. The grounds contain a trees and greenery.

It was built as the O'Loughlin Memorial Church by the O'Loughlin family of Sandfords Court. The site was donated by James Butler, the third Marquess of Ormonde. It was built to designs by William Hague (c.1840-99), under the supervision of William Henry Byrne (1866–1917).

The lack of ornamentation to the summit indicates that the additional stage and spire projected by Byrne in association with William Hogan was never executed.


Selected biography

Start-Class article Brian Cody (born on 12 July 1954 in Sheestown, County Kilkenny) is an Irish hurling manager and former player, currently managing the Kilkenny senior inter-county team, where he has been in charge since 1998. Cody is regarded as one of the greatest managers of the modern game.

As a player Cody enjoyed a successful career at club level with James Stephens and at inter-county level with Kilkenny. He established himself as a full-back with Kilkenny throughout the 1970s and 1980s and collected three All-Ireland titles, four Leinster titles and two National Hurling League titles.

Cody previously coached in all grades at club level with James Stephens before making the leap to inter-county management in November 1998 when he was appointed manager of Kilkenny. Currently in his twelfth season with Kilkenny, Cody is the second-longest serving coach in their history after Fr. Tommy Maher, while his tenure is the longest of all the current championship managers. During this time, Cody has guided Kilkenny to seven All-Ireland titles, ten Leinster titles and four National League titles. The team's dominance of the Leinster Championship is unparalleled in the modern era, to such an extent that Kilkenny have only lost one provincial game since Cody's inaugural season in 1999.


Selected Sport

C-Class article The 1972 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship Final was the 85th All-Ireland Final and the culmination of the 1972 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, an inter-county hurling tournament for the top teams in Ireland. The match was held at Croke Park, Dublin. The match was contested by 1970 winners Cork and 1971 runners-up Kilkenny, and it was refereed by Mick Spain from Offaly.


Selected picture

Selected Did you know

Kilkenny Castle


Selected geography

Ballyhale (Irish: Baile hÉil) is a village in County Kilkenny in Ireland. It is south of the city of Kilkenny, roughly half way between Kilkenny and Waterford. The Parish of Ballyhale is made up of three parts; Knockmoylan and the villages of Ballyhale and Knocktopher.


Selected history

The city shield as carved on the Tholsel

C-Class article The Statutes of Kilkenny were a series of thirty-five acts passed at Kilkenny in 1367, aiming to curb the decline of the Hiberno-Norman Lordship of Ireland. By the middle decades of the 13th century, the Hiberno-Norman presence in Ireland was perceived to be under threat, mostly due to the dissolution of English laws and customs among English settlers. These English settlers were described as "more Irish than the Irish themselves", referring to them taking up Irish law, custom, costume and language.

There were also military threats to the Norman presence, such as the failed invasion by Robert Bruce's brother Edward Bruce in 1315, which was defended by the Irish chief Domhnall Ó Néill in his Remonstrance to Pope John XXII, complaining that "For the English inhabiting our land ... are so different in character from the English of England ... that with the greatest propriety they may be called a nation not of middle medium, but of utmost, perfidy".

The statutes tried to prevent this "middle nation", which was neither true English nor (subjugated) Irish, by reasserting English culture among the English settlers. The statutes begin by recognising that the English settlers had been influenced by Irish culture and customs. They forebode the intermarriage between the native Irish and the native English, the English fostering of Irish children, the English adoption of Irish children and use of Irish names and dress.

The prime author of the statutes was Lionel of Antwerp, better known as the Duke of Clarence, and who was also the Earl of Ulster. In 1361, he had been sent as viceroy to Ireland by Edward III to recover his own lands in Ulster if possible and to turn back the advancing tide of the Irish. The statutes were enacted by a parliament that he summoned in 1366.


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